12-12-2019, 02:56 PM
#1
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
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What shaving products initially received a lot of hype but are hardly ever talked about now? A few off the top of my head include Irish Moos shave sticks, Edwin Jagger razors, Personna Med Prep Blades and  Provence Sante products. While Irish Moos is perhaps understandable since it is no longer made, all of the other products that I just listed used to be all the rage, are still produced and, are almost never discussed.

What other shaving products fit the bill?

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 12-12-2019, 04:04 PM
#2
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
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Until recently there was little said about MWF for quite some time. Same thing with MW soaps. Those conversations seem to be cyclical (calling Mr. C!). Barrister and Mann gets only the occasional mention nowadays. But yet, these are not flash-in-the-pan products.

Vintage Gillette razors seem (for the most part) to be currently/temporarily passe’ (sorry, I don’t know how to get an accent over the “e.”). Interest seems to have skewed towards modern razors. But yet, these are not flash-in-the-pan products.

Simpson Best and Super badger is infrequently discussed these days. They seem to have steered the interest to their higher end offerings. But yet, these are not flash-in-the-pan products.

Other than special or limited editions, boar is pretty much overlooked here, as is horse. There seems to be more conversation about synthetic brushes compared to boar and horse.
Boar is not a f-i-t-p product. Horse, while formerly was quite popular, now seems to be mostly an afterthought.

That’s all I’ve got for now...

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 12-12-2019, 04:19 PM
#3
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One Blade

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 12-13-2019, 05:28 AM
#4
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Seems to be lots of trends in traditional shaving, on the forums at least. Back when I started a top end setup would be a Merkur Progress, Simpsons Duke 3, Tabac shaving soap and splash... Nowadays none of these products are desirable or barely even comment worthy.

Vintage Gillette's, entry to mid level badgers, mass market soaps & creams... All of these are seemingly in decline whilst the appetite for stainless razors, high end badgers, modern synth knots in artisan handles & artisan software continues unabated. No doubt in another 5 years time the market will look very different again, I'm intrigued to see how it will evolve.

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 12-13-2019, 06:12 AM
#5
  • RyznRio
  • Active Member
  • Connecticut
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I have been wet shaving since April 2019. It seems to me that wet shaving is very similar to being a fan of professional hockey in the USA. No not the bloody faces of the players.

In both groups, we find a very interested, educated and dedicated base outside of which there is little to no interest.

a product comes out in the wet shaving world and generates a buzz. the shaving sites fan the flames and we each make the decision to buy or pass. buyers post their feelings about the product sometimes convincing the passers to become buyers. with small batch mfg you are either in or wishing you were generating unobtanium.

the point is that at some point everyone who wants the product has some or just can't find any for love or money. at that point, the buzz shifts to a new product in the marketplace.

Zamac razors are so passe throughout the community it seems to be a badge of honor to talk trash about the dirty pot metal coated in chrome. 

whoever wants a vintage gillette schick gem etc can find a decent one at a decent price and has a few either in a box or in a rotation. no buzz.

blades brushes soaps splashes and balms each have a moment in the light then fades to black as whoever wants has and whoever doesn't have moves on.

we all believe that the next one will be the best one of them all.

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 12-13-2019, 07:09 AM
#6
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(12-12-2019, 04:04 PM)chazt Wrote: Until recently there was little said about MWF for quite some time. Same thing with MW soaps. Those conversations seem to be cyclical (calling Mr. C!). Barrister and Mann gets only the occasional mention nowadays. But yet, these are not flash-in-the-pan products.

Charlie, I think I may have excessively stated how good Mystic Water soaps, over the past eight years, so it might be getting a bit tiring, for folks.  Smile
However, I believe it is still quite popular, and it has become my ONLY soap in my den.  Wink

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 12-13-2019, 07:14 AM
#7
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I mentioned it elsewhere and I'll add it here since it fits, but Clinique For Men. The "hype" back then was their own heavy advertising. From what I can tell, they seem to have their original line-up of products from the 80's that I used, and I don't see them mentioned at all.

I think I'm going to visit my local bookstore to check out a men's magazine and see if they still advertise.

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 12-13-2019, 12:33 PM
#8
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I guess I have a different definition for “flash in the pan.” Some of the products discussed did have a good run, but people have moved on from them. For me, that’s not a flash in the pan.

Perhaps some are viewing it more from the perspective of popularity in the forums, which I can understand. That said, by that definition, everything now seems like a flash in the pan. There are so many new products all the time relative to 5-10 years ago.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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 12-13-2019, 04:09 PM
#9
  • BSWoodturning
  • Co-Owner, Brad Sears ShaveWorks
  • Maryland Eastern Shore
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(12-13-2019, 05:28 AM)Rohleder Wrote: Seems to be lots of trends in traditional shaving, on the forums at least. Back when I started a top end setup would be a Merkur Progress, Simpsons Duke 3, Tabac shaving soap and splash... Nowadays none of these products are desirable or barely even comment worthy.

Vintage Gillette's, entry to mid level badgers, mass market soaps & creams... All of these are seemingly in decline whilst the appetite for stainless razors, high end badgers, modern synth knots in artisan handles & artisan software continues unabated. No doubt in another 5 years time the market will look very different again, I'm intrigued to see how it will evolve.

+1
The landscape is certainly changing.  In the brush market, Muhle STF's were all the rage four-five years ago, then died out and now seem to be coming back.  Competition has definitely sharpened on the high-end side, which I think is a good thing because it keeps makers on their/our(!) toes, and that only benefits the buying public.  Chinese brush makers are starting to come out with better-designed products and, given their lower production/distribution costs, I see them becoming a force to be reckoned with sooner rather than later.  (Again, the public wins!)  Artisan/small makers who aren't heavily leveraged should continue pretty much as they have over the past 10 or so years.  Interesting times.

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 12-13-2019, 06:59 PM
#10
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Three band silver tip , three bands were everything when I first started. Feather all stainless and MDC also , these products were at the top of everyone’s list. I still enjoy all products mentioned and I’m actually looking at getting a dense three band silver tip eventually from Mark at Simpson.

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 12-13-2019, 10:47 PM
#11
  • SCOV
  • Senior Member
  • Minnesota
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Somewhat newer wet shaver, so I may have missed the peak "hype and must have" phase.  However, would disagree with EJ razors, Med Prep blades and possibly One Blade - all are still fairly common today.  I must admit to missing the posts on "med prep vs lab blues" blades.  I do agree on the Muhle synthetics/Chinese brushes comment.


The one razor that comes to mind now is the vintage Gibbs razor.  Big item a few years ago with custom tools for blade fitting and comparison with the Rex razor.  Very seldom seen today in SOTD's

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 12-14-2019, 02:01 AM
#12
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Simpson brushes I would like to mention , I remember when every other gent had one in the den they absolutely loved , now there are the loyal fans but a lot of new folks don’t make them the first stop like in days past and a lot of folks don’t daily them. Still widely popular just not the same as I remember.

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 12-14-2019, 09:15 AM
#13
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Flash in the pan:
1. A thing or person whose sudden but brief success is not repeated or repeatable.
2. Something which disappoints by failing to deliver anything of value, despite a showy beginning.

Similar concept: one-hit-wonder (music)
Origin: Sometimes a musket’s priming powder would fire causing a bright flame & smoke yet fail to ignite the main charge and expel the bullet.
Examples: the Edsel, “new” coke, crystal pepsi, google glass


To that end, I’ll suggest a few:

Product category: pre-shave oil, a wholly unnecessary product that adds little - if anything to the experience.
Product: Maseto shaving brushes, hype-wild in 2018, now simply for-sale ads.
Product: The Wet Shave Club - a $29.99 monthly fee for a box of random shaving gear.
Product category: Shaving gel.
Product: in 2002 Gillette launched the vector in India, which failed because it didn’t take into account the lack of running water in the area.
Product: Bic, of lighters and disposable razors, introduced “Bic parfum” in 1989/90. That went about as well as you’d expect.

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 12-15-2019, 05:04 AM
#14
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Esbjerg, Baum.be, XPEC and other pricey shave creams

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 12-15-2019, 06:30 PM
#15
  • garyg
  • Senior Member
  • Great Lakes
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There's a couple others like Sir Irisch Moos that were axed for reasons known only to their manufacturers - another is the oft-discontinued Floid Blue, or Blenheim Bouquet Cream  A couple razors come to mind, besides the One Blade already mentioned who's problem is contained in its name.  Another example is the Mergress, which was once The Thing to lust after, but I don't notice anyone talking about it any longer (I notice the price has increased dramatically since I purchased mine circa 2009).  The shavette style safety razors seem to have cooled off recently too.

But, it may be those that are still made are simply unnoticed by me as my outlook on razors has changed over time,

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 12-15-2019, 10:14 PM
#16
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La Toja Manantiales

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 12-18-2019, 04:49 AM
#17
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Simpsons shaving cream.  Used to see it everywhere.  Can't recall the last time I saw a tub.

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 12-18-2019, 05:52 AM
#18
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(12-13-2019, 05:28 AM)Rohleder Wrote: Seems to be lots of trends in traditional shaving, on the forums at least. Back when I started a top end setup would be a Merkur Progress, Simpsons Duke 3, Tabac shaving soap and splash... Nowadays none of these products are desirable or barely even comment worthy.

Vintage Gillette's, entry to mid level badgers, mass market soaps & creams... All of these are seemingly in decline whilst the appetite for stainless razors, high end badgers, modern synth knots in artisan handles & artisan software continues unabated. No doubt in another 5 years time the market will look very different again, I'm intrigued to see how it will evolve.

Well I wouldn't say they are not desirable products. In my humble opinion, Tabac is still the best performing soap out there and the Duke 3 is one of only 3 badger brushes I own.  Maybe they are not discussed as much as they used to be, but that does not equate to not being a good or great product.

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 12-18-2019, 09:26 AM
#19
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
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I’m not sure if I can call it a flash in the pan as it was never wildly popular but, I have not sold any Pereira shave soap or any other Pereira products in eons. They are dust collectors.

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 12-19-2019, 08:57 AM
#20
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La Savonnier du Moulin was wildly popular and pretty much started the whole donkey milk craze.  Still fantastic soap but I don't see it talked about often enough.

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