09-24-2012, 12:22 PM
#1
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Evening all,

Just a question which I would like your opinion on.

When would you class a brush to be a shedder? If a brush was to loose 2-3 hairs every shave, is that a shedder? Or would you say it has to loose 20 plus hairs per shave to qualify?

Reason for this question is, around 2 years back my girlfriend bought me a lovely brush. It was fine but for around the past 4 months, it will always loose between 2-3 hairs if not used every day. If used every day, it would maybe loose around 1-2.

I'm not sure if I should be concerned or not yet!

Thanks

Dipesh

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 09-24-2012, 12:30 PM
#2
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I consider any hair loss after the first 20 uses to be of concern.

1 hair every 3 shaves, and I'll keep using it in hopes it will stop. 100% of the time so far, it has. 1 hair every shave without some intervening cause to make it shed, and I'm very concerned. My outcomes are never good. Usually the middle of the knot falls out. So far. Happened 2x.

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 09-24-2012, 12:52 PM
#3
  • Teiste
  • Moderator Emeritus
  • Salt Lake City,UT
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(09-24-2012, 12:30 PM)asharperrazor Wrote: I consider any hair loss after the first 20 uses to be of concern.

1 hair every 3 shaves, and I'll keep using it in hopes it will stop. 100% of the time so far, it has. 1 hair every shave without some intervening cause to make it shed, and I'm very concerned. My outcomes are never good. Usually the middle of the knot falls out. So far. Happened 2x.

Yes, I would say the same : if after 20 shaves still loosing hair (1,2,3 or even more bristles/hair) I will consider it a shedder , even if its a super densely packed brush.

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 09-24-2012, 12:57 PM
#4
  • njpaddy
  • Member
  • Central New Jersey
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For me it would depend on where it's leaving the hairs. If there's 1 or 2 on the soap after loading, or 1 or 2 coming out during the final rinse I ignore it. If it was leaving hairs on my face during lathering that would concern me. Have you tried a good cleaning, then trying to comb it out? Thater instructions with their brushes state that "dried up lather is the most common source of badger hairs breaking or shedding". After 2 years I'm not sure recourse you would have even if it was a shedder.

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 09-24-2012, 08:46 PM
#5
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i would have to agree with the above sentiments. That amount of hair seems to be a cause of concern. Follow Brian's suggestion about the cleaning and see what happens or if it continues.

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 09-25-2012, 11:09 PM
#6
  • GreekGuy
  • Not saving money yet....
  • La Jolla, CA
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While this is all very true, I found with my own brushes that having very hard water in San Diego, if I did not make a point to very throughly clean my brushes, residual soap scum would dry, leading to hair loss. I do know how the water is in the UK, but I would suggest giving your brush a proper thorough cleansing and then spending more time to ensure you remove any residual soap after your shave.

This will hopefully resolve the issue. It did for me so I think its worth a try

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 09-26-2012, 10:48 AM
#7
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Thanks chaps, I shall give this a go. Lets hope it stops!

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 09-26-2012, 11:47 AM
#8
  • njpaddy
  • Member
  • Central New Jersey
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After my earlier post I realized that I've been pretty derelict in taking care of my brushes and got them all out for a good cleaning. I have recently been using my Thater brush with the T&H cream samples and my well water, and it has been really obvious that even the thorough rinsing I give it after use still leaves a residue on the brush. This residue probably hasn't been as noticeable with my Simpson and Rooney brushes because I tend to also use them with soaps which may not leave as much visual residue as creams. Just a word of caution for those of us with hard water.

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 09-28-2012, 06:27 AM
#9
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And as if my magic, it's stopped.

Must have known I made this post!

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 09-29-2012, 05:39 AM
#10
  • Rod_Neep
  • Junior Member
  • Gloucestershire,U.K.
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Dipesh

It is perfectly normal for a new brush to shed a few hairs for up to a week or so of use, and the odd one thereafter. This is especially so with the extra dense badger knots.

If a brush continues to lose hairs, then it it the fault of the knot. (Not the brush maker).

BUT.... if a brush is stable for a long while and THEN starts to lose hairs, then the problem lies with something different.

The most common cause of hair failures:
1. Hard water and lime scale build up at the base of the hairs;
2. Dried soap at the base of the hairs.

The clues with your brush are that
a. it was OK for a long time
b. it lost more hairs after being allowed to dry out fully

The soap hardens around the hair, the hair becomes very fragile, and it breaks loose at the root. I have seen one month old brushes shed hairs and fail for this reason! Moral: make sure the brush is thoroughly washed out after every use.

In areas of very hard water, calcium deposits may form on the hairs. That can also make the hairs very brittle and stiff, and they may shed as a result. Soaking the hairs (not the handle) in a mixture of white vinegar and water for a couple of hours once a month or so can solve problems.

General maintenance occasionally to keep your brush in first class condition:
• warm bath
• wash with soap
• warm rinse
• soak in water/vinegar mixture if you are in a hard water area.
• warm rinse and another soap wash
• rinse
• conditioner - use normal hair conditioner. It works a treat.
• rinse
• A gentle squeeze, few light flicks, and strop it gently on a towel.
• It is OK to use a hair drier, but on low heat only.


Cheers
Rod

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 09-29-2012, 06:00 AM
#11
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I have followed the suggestions of Rod Neep.

Of all the ten stages, No:6 I use very cold water

After No:9 lightly comb through, whilst holding the knot.


Charles U.K

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