01-05-2020, 11:02 PM
#1
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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This set contains what I think is the original bakelite slant upon which other, later versions were based, including the white ones that rose to prominence a few years back and got immediately snapped up. They came in a plastic case with a clear lid. 

This beautiful brown and russet one is, remarkably, in unused, mint condition. I added the ”Grun” and “Schwartz” Gold-Stern blades which came from the Wermacht period, Solingen. I gave it all a very mild, restorative polish using old-formula Brasso.

The case has the distinctive Gold-Stern emblem of a male profile against a star. “Gold-Stern” translates to “Gold Star”. 

Pictures, then a few more words:

[Image: vbmy11F.jpg]
[Image: 7c8UpT0.jpg]
[Image: MIQLCme.jpg][Image: N7nYDqd.jpg][Image: PZTvxWo.jpg][Image: 6By8HbS.jpg]

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 01-05-2020, 11:14 PM
#2
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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I have seen one or two pictures of these slants, but little information is available. It may be a Globusmann ... or a Merkur, but who really knows. I did see one example with the Globusmann emblem impressed onto the end of the ‘solid’ handle, and the lugs/pins on the cap slotting into cups rather than through holes.

The reason I attribute to 1941 is on the basis of the Gold-Stern emblem on blades that I researched matching the bakelite case. I found a poster of the precise emblem:

[Image: CzEwDLq.jpg]

Note the 1941 date at the bottom of the poster. Gold-Stern was but one name of many brands produced by the same Solingen-based company (see the poster). Gold-Stern under Ern & Wills commenced in 1939, but this is not to say the slant and the box were produced by the same group, or made at the same time. There is no reason to think the kit is NOT original, but the components may have been produced separately then assembled and targeted/marketed differently. It is possibly to see variations of these German Bakelite cases with different emblems. In short: Gold-Stern got its start to at least 1939 (and possibly under Egon Wielpütz GmbH in 1922?). The slant? Might be even earlier than 1939.

Here’s a useful link, and you can find the Gold-Stern reference within:

https://www.archivingindustry.com/cutler...makers.htm

The Shave

It shaves incredibly well. I had my doubts it would be any good at all, but how wrong I was!

I can get a remarkably close shave with two-passes and touch-ups. I have no trouble under the nose, either. I just tweaked my technique.

I would welcome comments. 

Hope this adds to what we know about these Solingen bakelite slants.

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 01-05-2020, 11:53 PM
#3
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Lovley looking razor, thanks for sharing Smile

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 01-06-2020, 12:47 AM
#4
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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Here is a close-up of the Gold-Stern emblem on the lid of the case. Following it, image of a pack of blades (not mine). Rather good, I think.  Sleepy

[Image: ZtSN7is.jpg][Image: SaZqPNT.jpg]

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 01-06-2020, 03:30 AM
#5
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
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This seems to be a very interesting and historical, Shaun. Thank you for sharing. If you don’t mind me asking, where did you find such a pristine example?

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 01-06-2020, 03:42 AM
#6
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
User Info
(01-06-2020, 03:30 AM)chazt Wrote: This seems to be a very interesting and historical, Shaun. Thank you for sharing. If you don’t mind me asking, where did you find such a pristine example?

I have a habit of checking alternative web sales sites. I find, for example, that searching on ebay via your country’s homepage isn’t always the most useful or fruitful. I look at ebay.uk for example, and find different items for auction there than I do via ebay.au. It’s true. You’d think an international search would do the job, but nup. Things go for auction you might completely miss. Plus I am an inveterate researcher. I’d have made a great museologist, but I dedicated most of my working life to public health policy and disease prevention (pointy end stuff). Perhaps when I retire I could volunteer at a state museum or something? A few years before that though.

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