01-19-2020, 04:08 PM
#1
  • rev579
  • μαθητής
  • East Texas
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I have a brush that is far too floppy. It is ~19mm but set at 60mm. 

Not only do I like the handle, but I love how soft and comfortable this vintage brush is and would love to work out a solution. 

[Image: ZvvQejF.jpg]

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 01-19-2020, 04:12 PM
#2
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You can you your fingers to grip the brush instead of the handle like the (Italian) barbers of my youth used to hold a large boar brush. Or get a hair rubber band or hair tie and use that at the bottom of the knot. This will effectively lower the loft.

Enjoy. Nice looking handle.

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 01-19-2020, 04:44 PM
#3
  • DanLaw
  • Just an old slow fat man
  • Peachtree City, GA
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Or use a gentle elastic hair tie  Be sure to remove ASAP and thoroughly fluff to dry

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 01-19-2020, 07:19 PM
#4
  • rev579
  • μαθητής
  • East Texas
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Has anyone successfully removed and salvaged an old knot such as this?

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 01-19-2020, 08:16 PM
#5
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(01-19-2020, 07:19 PM)rev579 Wrote: Has anyone successfully removed and salvaged an old knot such as this?

I would send it to a brush artisan to do that. It isn't such an easy process to extract a knot from a handle unless you are knowledgeable with a cutting tool. 
This would be a more expensive solution, but it might be worth it if you really enjoy the knot. 
Good luck.

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 01-20-2020, 12:08 AM
#6
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I've heard of and seen more successful attempts of successfully removing a knot, but that usually requires destroying the handle in the process. I have seen some posts of individuals successfully freeing the knot and still saving the handle, but not with vintage handles. Even then when destroying the handle to remove the knot, it won't always be successful. I lost a Carter era Polo 10 Best knot to that when I sent it in to be reknotted with a new handle as at the base of the knot a crack was forming. I was informed of the risk before hand, but Simpson was great and offered a replacement modern brush at cost. I tried salvaging a knot myself with a handle that was already cracked excessively, and lost that knot. I can say don't try using brute force with the older knots as the epoxy is usually quite dried out and you'll be likely to break the knot like I did. As Celestino said, a cutting tool would have been the better solution, but I imagine I wouldn't have fared much better that way.

This isn't to say to give up hope on possibly extracting it. Not sure who to reach out to that has done well preserving old vintage knots.

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 01-20-2020, 12:33 PM
#7
  • BSWoodturning
  • Co-Owner, Brad Sears ShaveWorks
  • Maryland Eastern Shore
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(01-19-2020, 04:08 PM)rev579 Wrote: I have a brush that is far too floppy. It is ~19mm but set at 60mm. 

Not only do I like the handle, but I love how soft and comfortable this vintage brush is and would love to work out a solution. 

[Image: ZvvQejF.jpg]


Candidly, the hair tie/rubber band solution is probably your best bet.  But, given the two-piece handle construction, one possibility MIGHT BE to cut the knot out of the ferrule, then turn and attach a new ferrule and re-set the knot.  There are however a bunch of unknowns with any old brush that could cause things to go south.  But assuming everything goes well with knot/ferrule extraction, the new ferrule would probably need to 10mm (or more) taller to have room to "bury" the surplus loft.  

It would be a tricky, time-consuming, and therefore expensive operation with no guarantee of success.  So, I would strongly suggest the hair tie/rubber band solution first, then if that doesn't work for you, you can always send me a PM or give me a call and we can go into details.

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