03-02-2020, 10:03 AM
#1
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I went through a phase when I really liked to have my brushes bloomed while they sat on their shelves; I just liked how they looked.  But more recently I have leaned toward having them look more "new" and unused, so I have been using a cardboard toilet paper roll tube with cutouts and a couple plastic hair curling rollers to mold them.  After I use a brush in the morning, I rinse it well and dry it somewhat with paintbrush strokes against a white towel, then let it sit out on a counter for 10-12 hours.  At that point I put it into the tube or one of the rollers, depending upon its handle diameter, and again let it sit for another 24 hours before removing it.  This restores its shape to more like it was when new.  So this is my current phase...  Here are some before and after pictures.  It's interesting to me that it is not always the brushes with the highest relative loft that bloom the most.
[Image: hXbgfaZ.jpg]
[Image: I4O0kKg.jpg][Image: ZouVZe6.jpg]
[Image: jjml6Ke.jpg][Image: PgtC4DL.jpg]
[Image: iv6Rsg1.jpg][Image: JWgVivR.jpg]
[Image: yzTSpDM.jpg][Image: xp17qdk.jpg]
[Image: DF9MCEc.jpg][Image: 4vMKYDP.jpg]
[Image: t07SYXB.jpg][Image: jvrBlv2.jpg]

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 03-02-2020, 12:29 PM
#2
  • Sully
  • Super Moderator
  • Cedar Park, Texas
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Interesting.  I like the look of my brushes after I come back from a trip and they have finished drying in my travel brush holder.  I've never thought to do this as part of my routine.

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 03-02-2020, 01:03 PM
#3
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I should note that over time the "restored" brushes gradually relax a little bit into a slightly bloomed form.  I realize that this routine reflects an unusual amount of time spent on my brushes and perhaps a degree of OCD, but I'm retired and don't have a lot of other demands on my time.  And it's fun.

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 03-02-2020, 01:18 PM
#4
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I'm all for this methodology. Not only does it keep them looking "new", but it also reduces the amount of space they take up on the shelf.

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 03-02-2020, 03:43 PM
#5
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Years ago, I tried that a few times, but decided I prefer the look of a bloomed badger knot.  These days I'm using synthetics more, and the knots don't bloom.

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 03-02-2020, 04:46 PM
#6
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
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John, I like the look. A few years ago I gave up my office/den when my daughter moved back home for a while. I kept three brushes out for a week at a time and stored the others in their boxes. Every time I changed the rotation I really liked the “new” look of the knots. Thanks for sharing your pics Smile

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 03-02-2020, 05:28 PM
#7
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Totally with you on this one. Love to keep them in their pouch and the way they look when I am going to use them.


Greetings from Santa Rosa, CA

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 03-02-2020, 08:45 PM
#8
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I use a thick elastic band to keep the knot tight (new). This saves space on the shelf for all of my brushes.  Shy

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 03-03-2020, 03:09 AM
#9
  • Mouser
  • Senior Member
  • Forest City, Florida U.S.A.
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(03-02-2020, 10:03 AM)churchilllafemme Wrote: I went through a phase when I really liked to have my brushes bloomed while they sat on their shelves; I just liked how they looked.  But more recently I have leaned toward having them look more "new" and unused, so I have been using a cardboard toilet paper roll tube with cutouts and a couple plastic hair curling rollers to mold them.  After I use a brush in the morning, I rinse it well and dry it somewhat with paintbrush strokes against a white towel, then let it sit out on a counter for 10-12 hours.  At that point I put it into the tube or one of the rollers, depending upon its handle diameter, and again let it sit for another 24 hours before removing it.  This restores its shape to more like it was when new.  So this is my current phase...  Here are some before and after pictures.  It's interesting to me that it is not always the brushes with the highest relative loft that bloom the most.
[Image: hXbgfaZ.jpg]
[Image: I4O0kKg.jpg][Image: ZouVZe6.jpg]
[Image: jjml6Ke.jpg][Image: PgtC4DL.jpg]
[Image: iv6Rsg1.jpg][Image: JWgVivR.jpg]
[Image: yzTSpDM.jpg][Image: xp17qdk.jpg]
[Image: DF9MCEc.jpg][Image: 4vMKYDP.jpg]
[Image: t07SYXB.jpg][Image: jvrBlv2.jpg]

John, I've always preferred the "unbloomed" look in my brushes so after they dry I use one of my wife's little hair scrunchies,  the smooth not crinkly ones, roll it on from bottom of the handle and up to the middle of the knot. It only needs to stay on a very short while, sometimes less than an hour, then I roll it off, always upwards, and the knot presents as new and unbloomed and stays that way.

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 03-03-2020, 09:38 AM
#10
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I previously tried this using rubber bands, but they seemed to leave a circumferential dent in the knot that I didn't like.  Perhaps a looser, less restrictive band or a wider one like Celestino described would work well.  I guess the only advantage to my method is that I think it may more easily allow the brush to continue to dry.

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 03-03-2020, 11:22 AM
#11
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After flinging out the water and squeezing them with a towel, I just let them dry freely. The brushes look slightly fluffed compared to new.[Image: 46e525df10e20da2d72895ab9700573d.jpg]

Just add water and stir.

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 03-03-2020, 01:54 PM
#12
  • Mouser
  • Senior Member
  • Forest City, Florida U.S.A.
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(03-03-2020, 09:38 AM)churchilllafemme Wrote: I previously tried this using rubber bands, but they seemed to leave a circumferential dent in the knot that I didn't like.  Perhaps a looser, less restrictive band or a wider one like Celestino described would work well.  I guess the only advantage to my method is that I think it may more easily allow the brush to continue to dry.

The hair scrunchies are very lightly elastic and are covered in a sort of velvet so they're easy on the knots. She has dozens and dozens of them and only the brand new ones bring in my 22mm knots. The oldest I use on my largest knots.
I've  never brought up this little quirk of mine before because everyone seems to go wild over "bloomed" pics. I am not alone in this vastness.

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 03-03-2020, 04:07 PM
#13
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Some knots definitely look better when they aren't bloomed. The ones that bloom like crazy look ugly in my opinion and take up extra space in the medicine cabinet.

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 03-03-2020, 06:50 PM
#14
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John, thank you so much for this post. I thought I was the only one who did this! 

Same here-overnight drying and then right into a cardboard tube or a plastic travel container for the really big brushes!

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 03-03-2020, 07:29 PM
#15
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(03-03-2020, 06:50 PM)Michael P Wrote: John, thank you so much for this post. I thought I was the only one who did this! 

Same here-overnight drying and then right into a cardboard tube or a plastic travel container for the really big brushes!

Definitely a great method. Those oumo manchuria have pretty wild bloom. My Dec B6 doesn't though which I appreciate.

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 03-04-2020, 12:08 AM
#16
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Great idea, I never thought of doing this. But I like the look and it’s simple and cheap. Thank you for sharing.

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 03-05-2020, 08:09 AM
#17
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(03-02-2020, 10:03 AM)churchilllafemme Wrote: I went through a phase when I really liked to have my brushes bloomed while they sat on their shelves; I just liked how they looked.  But more recently I have leaned toward having them look more "new" and unused, so I have been using a cardboard toilet paper roll tube with cutouts and a couple plastic hair curling rollers to mold them.  After I use a brush in the morning, I rinse it well and dry it somewhat with paintbrush strokes against a white towel, then let it sit out on a counter for 10-12 hours.  At that point I put it into the tube or one of the rollers, depending upon its handle diameter, and again let it sit for another 24 hours before removing it.  This restores its shape to more like it was when new.  So this is my current phase...  Here are some before and after pictures.  It's interesting to me that it is not always the brushes with the highest relative loft that bloom the most.
[Image: hXbgfaZ.jpg]
[Image: I4O0kKg.jpg][Image: ZouVZe6.jpg]
[Image: jjml6Ke.jpg][Image: PgtC4DL.jpg]
[Image: iv6Rsg1.jpg][Image: JWgVivR.jpg]
[Image: yzTSpDM.jpg][Image: xp17qdk.jpg]
[Image: DF9MCEc.jpg][Image: 4vMKYDP.jpg]
[Image: t07SYXB.jpg][Image: jvrBlv2.jpg]

Beautiful brushes! 
I tend to enjoy my boars well bloomed, my badgers not so much. My bulb knots seem to resist a dramatic bloom better than the more hybrid knots. I just know that when I grab a well bloomed boar, I'm in for a great shave.

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 03-05-2020, 08:19 AM
#18
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I’ve wondered about this myself.  Great post!
The only questionable part would be standing in line at Walgreens to buy the plastic curlers.

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 03-13-2020, 03:30 AM
#19
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I had used rubber band in the past for the same purpose and it worked pretty well. No hassles solution.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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 03-13-2020, 08:50 AM
#20
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(03-13-2020, 03:30 AM)Jags009 Wrote: I had used rubber band in the past for the same purpose and it worked pretty well. No hassles solution.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I've done that too, but it was difficult for me to find rubber bands of the right tightness to hold the knots together without leaving a "dent" in them.  For me the tubes just work a bit more easily.

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