03-17-2020, 02:21 AM
#1
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In the past, I haven't really had an issue with purchasing used shave equipment, including shave soaps. Now I am rethinking that practice. I would still purchase a used razor, as it is the easiest to disinfect, but brushes and soaps? I am done with that practice for the time being. What are your thoughts?

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 03-17-2020, 03:10 AM
#2
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Yes.  Disinfect and boil in water for several minutes.  Brushes and soaps no.

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 03-17-2020, 04:21 AM
#3
  • NJDJ
  • Senior Member
  • New Jersey
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Yes, no problem.   If you are super concerned, just don't use them immediately.   "Quarantine" the package for a few weeks. If there is virus it will be dead.

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 03-17-2020, 04:22 AM
#4
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
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I’m with you, my man. Nothing used for a while...

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 03-17-2020, 06:16 AM
#5
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I don't see a problem buying a used razor.  It would just need to be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected.

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 03-17-2020, 06:20 AM
#6
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Yes, no problem at all. In fact I received a s/h brush and razor in the past few days. One thing I'm not buying is into the mass hysteria, bored of constantly hearing about it now to be honest  Tongue

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 03-17-2020, 06:29 AM
#7
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Only ever bought second hand straights and I always sanitize a few times over a couple days. I would do the same with any other items  if I purchased on the market

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 03-17-2020, 06:49 AM
#8
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Put them in quarantine for at least ten days, that should do it.

With used shave gear you should be more worried about hepatitis.

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 03-17-2020, 08:27 AM
#9
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(03-17-2020, 06:49 AM)apogee. Wrote: Put them in quarantine for at least ten days, that should do it.

With used shave gear you should be more worried about hepatitis.

Agree. The coronavirus only lives for a few days on solid, flat surfaces - less so on rough surfaces like carpet, etc.
You are much more likely to get it from touching common items at the grocery store, transit vehicles, stairway rails, money, and... your cellphone.

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 03-17-2020, 09:56 AM
#10
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Wuhan flu is over hyped. Now the medical establishment is beginning to think it has been in the USA since November and has been responsible for the minor fevers and cold like symptoms that many people reported. But we just don't know since we didn't test for it.

Shave gear? Mike the Kraken nailed it.

Don't panic gents. Just do what you'd normally do to dodge the cold or flu. That's the best anyone can do. If you'd quarantine gear and soap for the cold and flu continue to do so, otherwise just carry on. But as already stated there are much worse things to be concerned about and whatever you did for those, again, continue and you're golden.

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 03-17-2020, 10:11 AM
#11
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(03-17-2020, 09:56 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Wuhan flu is over hyped. Now the medical establishment is beginning to think it has been in the USA since November and has been responsible for the minor fevers and cold like symptoms that many people reported. But we just don't know since we didn't test for it.

Shave gear? Mike the Kraken nailed it.

Don't panic gents. Just do what you'd normally do to dodge the cold or flu. That's the best anyone can do. If you'd quarantine gear and soap for the cold and flu continue to do so, otherwise just carry on. But as already stated there are much worse things to be concerned about and whatever you did for those, again, continue and you're golden.

Coudn't agree with you more. For the wast majority of us, COVID 19 is like a viral cold or flu. Would be inconvenient and unpleasant to get it, but not deadly. However, the elderly and people with compromised immune systems and respiratory conditions are the ones that should definitely be concerned. But really, this holds true for the flu as well.

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 03-17-2020, 10:57 AM
#12
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(03-17-2020, 10:11 AM)meshave Wrote:
(03-17-2020, 09:56 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Wuhan flu is over hyped. Now the medical establishment is beginning to think it has been in the USA since November and has been responsible for the minor fevers and cold like symptoms that many people reported. But we just don't know since we didn't test for it.

Shave gear? Mike the Kraken nailed it.

Don't panic gents. Just do what you'd normally do to dodge the cold or flu. That's the best anyone can do. If you'd quarantine gear and soap for the cold and flu continue to do so, otherwise just carry on. But as already stated there are much worse things to be concerned about and whatever you did for those, again, continue and you're golden.

Coudn't agree with you more. For the wast majority of us, COVID 19 is like a viral cold or flu. Would be inconvenient and unpleasant to get it, but not deadly. However, the elderly and people with compromised immune systems and respiratory conditions are the ones that should definitely be concerned. But really, this holds true for the flu as well.


My thoughts on the matter, precisely. Here's a recently published letter in a UK newspaper and someone with commonsense as far as I'm concerned.

[Image: RutXc7i.jpg]

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 03-17-2020, 11:40 AM
#13
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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Do not let confirmation bias get in the way of following sound, public health advice. One letter from one doctor does not a Covid-19 impact-free world make. I work in the public health system. Don't panic, no, but do not ignore real advice from infectious diseases experts.

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 03-17-2020, 12:23 PM
#14
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(03-17-2020, 11:40 AM)Shaun Wrote: Do not let confirmation bias get in the way of following sound, public health advice. One letter from one doctor does not a Covid-19 impact-free world make. I work in the public health system. Don't panic, no, but do not ignore real advice from infectious diseases experts.
Agreed. My wife works at a hospital and while I completely agree that "panic" is not warranted, neither is a "laissez-faire" attitude. Look at Italy, friends. The fact is there is simply too much we DO NOT know about this virus.

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 03-17-2020, 01:22 PM
#15
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A hype?

Gentlemen, I am afraid you are very, very wrong about Covid 19.

Think of a flu, but twice as contagious.
Then do the math of 5% needing intensive care and 3% needing a mechanical respirator.

Have a look at Italy, where hospitals are running out of face masks, protective garment and healthy personnel. 
A desaster with hundreds dying each and every day.

Want some interesting math?
Read this:
https://medium.com/@tomaspueyo/coronavir...d3d9cd99ca

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 03-17-2020, 02:28 PM
#16
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(03-17-2020, 01:22 PM)apogee. Wrote: A hype?

Gentlemen, I am afraid you are very, very wrong about Covid 19.

Think of a flu, but twice as contagious.
Then do the math of 5% needing intensive care and 3% needing a mechanical respirator.

Have a look at Italy, where hospitals are running out of face masks, protective garment and healthy personnel. 
A desaster with hundreds dying each and every day.

Want some interesting math?
Read this:
https://medium.com/@tomaspueyo/coronavir...d3d9cd99ca

Those estimates are based on an alarming lack of data, and most sensible doctors agree that 5% is high. A balanced view of the numbers without panic included: https://newcriterion.com/blogs/dispatch/...ed-to-what

So far, the United States has seen forty-one deaths from the infection. Twenty-two of those deaths occurred in one poorly run nursing home outside of Seattle, the Life Care Center. Another nine deaths occurred in the rest of Washington state, leaving ten deaths (four in California, two in Florida, and one in each of Georgia, Kansas, New Jersey, and South Dakota) spread throughout the rest of the approximately 329 million residents of the United States. This represents roughly .000012 percent of the U.S. population.

As of Monday, approximately 89 percent of Italy’s coronavirus deaths had been over the age of seventy, according to The Wall Street Journal. Sad to say, those victims were already nearing the end of their lifespans. They might have soon died from another illness. No child under the age of nine has died from the illness worldwide.

There were 34,200 deaths in the United States during the 2018–19 influenza season, estimates the cdc. We did not shut down public events and institutions to try to slow the spread of the flu. Yet we have already destroyed $5 trillion in stock market wealth over the last few weeks in the growing coronavirus panic, reports The New York Times, wiping out retirement savings for many.

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 03-17-2020, 02:42 PM
#17
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(03-17-2020, 01:22 PM)apogee. Wrote: A hype?

Gentlemen, I am afraid you are very, very wrong about Covid 19.

Think of a flu, but twice as contagious.
Then do the math of 5% needing intensive care and 3% needing a mechanical respirator.

Have a look at Italy, where hospitals are running out of face masks, protective garment and healthy personnel. 
A desaster with hundreds dying each and every day.

Want some interesting math?
Read this:
https://medium.com/@tomaspueyo/coronavir...d3d9cd99ca
I know, many more succumb to the flu, but really the question posited in this thread was whether or not you would buy used shaving gear. If we can't stick to the subject, then I suggest the mods close this thread.

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 03-17-2020, 02:45 PM
#18
  • RyznRio
  • Active Member
  • Connecticut
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A good soak in 91% alcohol will clean a razor. If I can wash the virus off of my hands then I think I can wash it out of a brush after a vinegar soak. I personally don't like the idea of using someone else's soap. I think the soap thing goes back to high school football days so I didn't buy used soap before the virus so I won't now for sure.

The problem with THE VIRUS is that it is so easy to get it and for about 4 days you can spread it while you have no symptoms. For the compromised among us, this is a death sentence. Going to visit mom or grandpa while you are sick could kill them. If they are living in a nursing home your visit could wipe out the building. if you sit next to someone who is compromised in a cafe or bar then your virus has a very good chance to kill them. while all these people will need to be in the hospital we will not have space for that many people all at once. that's what happened in Italy. who gets the last respirator when there are over a hundred people at the hospital waiting for a respirator to keep them alive long enough to beat THE VIRUS or to die peacefully. Who do you send to die at home? How long will you have to wait with your dead loved one(s) for officials to figure out how to safely remove the body. In Italy, it was 2 to 3 days. Me for one, I am taking this seriously while not shutting the door on the bunker. wash up, social distance, only go out for a good reason or just use whatever common sense I can muster cause we are all (elected officials included) doing this for the first time and making it up as we go along.

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 03-17-2020, 03:24 PM
#19
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Just to be clear, influenza is just as easy to get and affected early-onset cases are also communicable. If you are visiting at-risk populations with either - they’ll be at risk. Stating that it’s a death sentence is reactionary and hyperbole - we already have good data on fatalities. COVID-19 can result in a more severe upper-respiratory illness, while attempts to contain the spread of influenza are much less effective and therefore it’ll affect more people.

To return to shaving - with used gear and people alike: either abstain from contact or use quarantine measures until the contamination period passes. The risk with used shaving gear has always been there, it’s fairly easy to work around - but each individual will ultimately need to make up his/her own mind.

All that said, I will honor the spirit of the thread and desist responding to the spread of FUD.

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 03-17-2020, 05:23 PM
#20
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(03-17-2020, 12:23 PM)primotenore Wrote:
(03-17-2020, 11:40 AM)Shaun Wrote: Do not let confirmation bias get in the way of following sound, public health advice. One letter from one doctor does not a Covid-19 impact-free world make. I work in the public health system. Don't panic, no, but do not ignore real advice from infectious diseases experts.
Agreed. My wife works at a hospital and while I completely agree that "panic" is not warranted, neither is a "laissez-faire" attitude. Look at Italy, friends. The fact is there is simply too much we DO NOT know about this virus.

I'm certainly not recommending a "laissez-faire" attitude. Simply saying that the the current evidence indicates that this virus is more like the flu and cold, not like the ebola virus. The global response seems to be vastly out of proportion. I have colleagues worrying about our employer shutting down, their jobs being lost or temporarily suspended and worrying about supporting their family.......etc. One said, "I have young children and I have to worry about such things.". We have 0 cases within 100 mile radius of us.

It would have been appropriate for a virus along the lines of ebola, but not what we know about covid-19. 

Also, following sound medical advice is something we should be doing in any case, not just when there is a pandemic. Besides, the sound medical advice if you have symptoms is along the lines of what you would do if you had the flu  -- wash hands, don't touch your face or others, isolate if you have symptoms, ....etc. Monitor your symptoms, and if they get worse, or don't go away in about 7-10 days, seek medical advice. If you are an elderly person or someone with chronic respiratory conditions or a compromised immune system, seek medical advice immediately. These are all things you would do if you have the flu symptoms.

The only additional thing they are doing, is accessing your risk of exposure by askin if you made contact with a known or suspected infected person, or came from a geographical region with high infection rates. 

Also, when it comes to death rates, we shouldn't just accept the numbers for many reasons.

1) Unreported cases -- The numbers of deaths seems to be measured against the known/reported infected cases. However there could be large numbers of cases were the infection leads to mild symptoms and is not reported. We simply do not know what these numbers are. More research and time would be needed to determine this. 
2) Timing of infection -- A true death rate would be factoring in the infections at a given time and the deaths resulting from those infections at that time. This is to say that the deaths today should be measured against the total number of infections that occurred at the time in the past when the infection leading to the death occurred. But infected numbers are measure in current time. Therefore, measuring deaths in current time against infections in current time gives a false death rate.
3) The sample size is very small. This is to say that compared to the global population, the number of infected represents a very small sample. In addition, the sample size in many countries is small enough that regionalized anomalies and issues can skew the numbers. For example, poor care in a hospital with high numbers can lead a higher death rate, which can skew the overall rate. 

Again, all I'm saying is death rates cannot be taken on face value. 

I think I may have written too much. I will stop here.

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