03-20-2020, 04:40 PM
#1
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It’s a strange, strange world we live live in.....
Just touching base to say that I hope this message finds you all well.
I’m still ok, my works been reduced to 2 days in the office, 3 home. It may go down to 1 day office, 4 home.
Living in New York, the government is closing down all nonessential business this Sunday for 2weeks. We’ll see how that goes went the vast majority is out of work with no pay check, with no warning.
Stay safe. Johnus


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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 03-20-2020, 04:49 PM
#2
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
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Yes. Stay healthy and strong, Johnus.

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 03-20-2020, 07:06 PM
#3
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NY is a big place, do you mean NYC? If so, you're a much better person than I am. No way would you catch me there even at the best of times*. But now? I can't imagine a better human petri dish than NYC. Stay well.

Doing good in rural Maine. The nearest neighbor is 100 yards away, the biggest threat is when we go into town for whatever they have for supplies. But this in New England and we can get snowed in for quite some time. So if the S'market doesn't have something it's no big deal, we'll do fine anyway, we just change plans to match what we have.

*I'm originally from 20 miles outside the city.

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 03-21-2020, 12:34 AM
#4
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I live in beautiful Suisse, 30km to the Italian border.
We are preparing for the perfect storm with additional respirators, a new app “beekeeper” for planning and directing all personnel, so that for an example when kitchen or laundry staff gets problems they can help each other.
There is a bunker within our hospital with oxygen and all other supplies, a former op theatre, now our Centre for crew resource managment training. It might or might not get usage from military, we’ll see. 

Neighboring hospital already has 19cases, 2intubated, expecting more to come. They have asked for our pulmonologist and 1 or 2 anaesthesiologists to help when their 10 additional respirators are busy. As difficult it is to get respirators today, it is even more difficult to get ICU staff. Impossible.
About 50% of our nurses and technical personnel are “frontalieri”. They live in Ticino, Tyrolia (Italy) or Austria and work here with us in Switzerland. Closing borders completely would make work nearly impossible even under normal conditions. 

Everything still calm here, but it will come. Hopefully not as hard as in Italy, where 627 died in the last 24hours.

Me? I am an anaesthesiologist.
I am male, older than 50 and work in public health. This is a subgroup with a pretty unpleasant mortality rate, so please keep me in good memorySmile

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 03-21-2020, 11:53 PM
#5
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Things are a little weird in Norway... schools closed, people not allowed to go to their cabins, the end-of-school celebration for those finishing high school might be cancelled etc. Nothing too different from what is happening everywhere else, but we're used to such things happening abroad and not at home. most people - with a few exceptions, off course - are taking the whole thing in good spirit and treats it as a national "dugnad" (a hard to translate word - or at least I don't know a good English translation - that means the community or a group comes together to do something that is too big for one person to do.. think everything from bake-sale to raise cash for the local sports club, via cleaning a neighbourhood, through barn-raising and beyond).

I did however use some of the time at home to go through my folder of saved images from the internet, and I found two posters from WW2 that works just as well in this situation as they did back then:
[Image: GjEl7zd.jpg]
[Image: CNFJJtz.png]
This time the enemy is invisible to our eyes, the front lines is in every home and nation, and the weapons we use are very different... but if we stand together we will come through victorious, even if we might be in for a long, rough ride.

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 03-22-2020, 05:01 AM
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Hans, why don't "they" want people to go to their cabins? If they are as I picture them in my minds eye they are out of the populated areas and in clear air. There would be no better place to be to remain uninfected. There must be something wrong with the picture I have in my mind.

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 03-22-2020, 06:56 AM
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(03-22-2020, 05:01 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Hans, why don't "they" want people to go to their cabins? If they are as I picture them in my minds eye they are out of the populated areas and in clear air. There would be no better place to be to remain uninfected. There must be something wrong with the picture I have in my mind.

Because the local health services is scaled for the people living in the municipality, not for ten times as many.
Basically its about not overwhelming small hospitals and clinics.

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 03-23-2020, 05:45 AM
#8
  • RyznRio
  • Active Member
  • Connecticut
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Prepare for the worst and hope for the best. As the rest of the world has done, Connecticut closed all public open areas including parks and beaches. My wife and I got the last walk at the beach yesterday, 3/22. So far so good, we are well and maintaining isolation and social distance. If you pray, pray for a vaccine.

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 03-23-2020, 06:16 AM
#9
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Thanks Hans. Yes, that makes sense.

Doing good in rural Maine. The state has 89(?) presumed and test confirmed cases which is nothing. By now I assume that some of those self quarantined people have shown no symptoms or have gotten better. No deaths. Quite a few were in one retirement home.

Personally we don't find much to buy when we go shopping, but we don't need much either. We've been ready for something like this for quite some time so we aren't competing with others who need supplies more than we do.

Last week I was discussing things with a nurse while I was getting prepped for a medical procedure* and asked if she had heard the rumor that Covid-19 had been in the USA since Nov' but no one knew what to call it back then. She replied that her parents had an illness that fit the symptoms perfectly in Nov' and 3 days later it was gone. She went on to tell me that when we start to do heavy duty testing that many would show the virus and we'd figure out that it had been here for quite some time before ever knowing what it was. Continuing, her concern was that the hospital was currently fighting 2 flus, and additional patients might swamp them.

*Hospitals are closed except for emergencies and procedures that can't wait. I originally had my procedure scheduled for last Tuesday, then it was rescheduled for late April. Then they called me on Tuesday to tell me that they wanted me in the next day, Wednesday. They were concerned about cancer, but it turned out that the blood tests, while part of it raised a flag, that concern was unfounded.  Of course I liked hearing their words. In the last few months I've had observations and pictures taken in places of my body that I never knew could be seen. Last weeks was another one of those. But back to the hospital... in a surgery that can handle preps and recoveries of maybe 50 people there were only 3 of us in it and the 3rd arrived while I was prepped and waiting, an emergency that swallowed a paperclip. From what I overheard this was SOP for that person and they knew her well.

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 03-23-2020, 08:08 AM
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You can't confirm cases unless you test... a common problem throughout the world (with a couple of exceptions, like South Korea) is since there is not enough tests there is significant under reporting. Some countries (*cough* Russia *cough*) also officially diagnose a lot of likely COVID-19 cases as other respiratory illness - either for internal or external propaganda. It's also likely that a lot of countries actually got the virus well ahead of the "official date", which also leads to under reporting; it's hard to determine if the illness you suffered months ago is the new hot virus or not...

We've put in a decent store of food that will keep, but some of the things that people hoard is amusing me. Today there was more meat on the shelves than it was last week when I went shopping, but today there wasn't much milk to be had in my local groceries store... I mean, milk don't keep, do it?

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 03-23-2020, 08:45 AM
#11
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
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Almond milk and Organic cow’s milk have a good shelf life.

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 03-23-2020, 08:47 AM
#12
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
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We just got the results of Gayle’s covid test.

NEGATIVE!!!

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 03-23-2020, 11:32 AM
#13
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That is good to hear Charlie Biggrin

And the milk that people seems to be hoarding is regular, pasteurised, little over one week shelf life milk...  Dodgy

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 03-23-2020, 11:51 AM
#14
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
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(03-23-2020, 11:32 AM)WegianWarrior Wrote: That is good to hear Charlie Biggrin
Yes, it is! One less thing for me to worry about and try to protect her from... Thank you, Hans.

And the milk that people seems to be hoarding is regular, pasteurised, little over one week shelf life milk...  Dodgy

Whenever I see or hear that word it reminds me of the joke about the guy who was told to take a milk bath, but only up to his chest.

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 03-23-2020, 12:50 PM
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That's good news Charlie. Thumbup

Exactly Hans, confirmed cases are confirmed by test, that's why I wrote both presumed and tested cases to separate them. There aren't enough test kits right now so if someone was around someone who is known to have it to an extent only the medical authorities know they just presume infection and tell them to self quarantine. But the total number of presumed and tested is reported and that's what I remember. Too many numbers to keep straight otherwise and frankly the breakdown is unimportant to me.

The store shelves are beginning to recover for some items. We went shopping and there was little that we couldn't get that was on our list. TP was still totally gone, but we're good there for quite some time. Some canned meat was absent, but again, we're good there. Eventually we'll replace what we've used. There were absolutely no cold/flu medications and aspirin and such a week ago and today there were some to be had. So things are turning around. Lots of signs on shelves, paper products mostly, limiting what could be purchased per customer. After the horse has run out of the barn shut the door. They needed to do that 2 weeks ago. It also would have been nice if the media had told the public that loose bowels isn't one of the symptoms, but they didn't. They concentrated on scaring people with nonstop BS.

We shop at a surplus food outlet before doing the bulk of our shopping at the supermarket. There are few regularly stocked items but if something is on the list and they happen to have it one can save some $ and lots of times I find things that I can find nowhere else. They still had all sorts of canned meats and I would have thought they'd also be sold out after the big panic. People are lemmings. Let's all go to this store that has bare shelves  for "stuff",  while a block away, just around the corner, there's plenty to be had on the shelves for panic buying. I notice lots of things, but to restock our larder shelves I'll wait for our preferred brands. We're in no hurry. We've done nothing unusual so far, heck, I'm even still in ketosis. At this time I see no reason to start eating carbs and burn sugar.

On a positive note we're finding things in the freezer that we had forgotten was in it and we're making use of it even if it's only fit for dog food now.

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 03-23-2020, 04:03 PM
#16
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
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Thanks Brian for the good wishes.

It sounds like you have your level head working as it should. Smart man!

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