03-22-2020, 10:17 AM
#1
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I have 2 questions about eliminating excess water from a shaving brush. 

1. After soaking or wetting the brush prior to a shave is it better to squeeze the hairs to eliminate the excess water, or shake the brush?

  2. After the shave when I rinse the brush, is it better to squeeze the hairs to eliminate the excess water, or shake the brush?

  I'm asking because I'm worried if I shake the brush too hard I'll force the hairs out in time.

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 03-22-2020, 10:39 AM
#2
  • evnpar
  • Emeritus
  • Portland, Oregon
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I gently squeeze, then shake, then do several strokes on a towel before putting it away.

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 03-22-2020, 11:26 AM
#3
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(03-22-2020, 10:39 AM)evnpar Wrote: I gently squeeze, then shake, then do several strokes on a towel before putting it away.

And before the shave after you wet or soak your brush?

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 03-22-2020, 12:10 PM
#4
  • DanLaw
  • Just an old slow fat man
  • Peachtree City, GA
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Squeeze after soaking by encircling the knot between thumb and index finger forming a circle GENTLY closing the knot without pulling out from the handle. NEVER shake a brush. If putting in stand will paint several strokes on a towel prior to hanging

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 03-22-2020, 12:13 PM
#5
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(03-22-2020, 11:26 AM)Alex7 Wrote:
(03-22-2020, 10:39 AM)evnpar Wrote: I gently squeeze, then shake, then do several strokes on a towel before putting it away.

And before the shave after you wet or soak your brush?

A gentle squeeze prior to the shave will release as much water as you’d like. If you’re losing hairs from a squeeze, shaking out water, or towel stropping - there is something wrong with the knot. Brushes are pretty resilient, no need to treat them with kid gloves.

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 03-22-2020, 12:20 PM
#6
  • ChiefBroom
  • Chief of Dark Holler
  • Fort Collins, Colorado, USA
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(03-22-2020, 12:13 PM)mike_the_kraken Wrote:
(03-22-2020, 11:26 AM)Alex7 Wrote:
(03-22-2020, 10:39 AM)evnpar Wrote: I gently squeeze, then shake, then do several strokes on a towel before putting it away.

And before the shave after you wet or soak your brush?

A gentle squeeze prior to the shave will release as much water as you’d like. If you’re losing hairs from a squeeze, shaking out water, or towel stropping - there is something wrong with the knot. Brushes are pretty resilient, no need to treat them with kid gloves.

+1. And I always shake five times after gentle squeezing while simultaneous rotating the handle exactly 90 degrees between each shake. I'm pretty sure bad things would happen if I deviated from that ritual. Nothing bad has ever happened in consequence of adhering to it.

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 03-22-2020, 02:11 PM
#7
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I saw you asked the same question over on the straight razor place and the shave den also...but I will put my reply here too.. I soak the brush if its not a synthetic and gently shake excess out and add as needed while building lather and after the shave i wash out brush and again gently shake out water and then hang to dry before putting up. If i'm breaking in the brush after use and shaking out some of the water i may brush it against a towel to aid with breaking in before hanging it to finish drying and then storing it.....

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 03-22-2020, 05:09 PM
#8
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(03-22-2020, 12:20 PM)ChiefBroom Wrote:
(03-22-2020, 12:13 PM)mike_the_kraken Wrote:
(03-22-2020, 11:26 AM)Alex7 Wrote: And before the shave after you wet or soak your brush?

A gentle squeeze prior to the shave will release as much water as you’d like. If you’re losing hairs from a squeeze, shaking out water, or towel stropping - there is something wrong with the knot. Brushes are pretty resilient, no need to treat them with kid gloves.

+1. And I always shake five times after gentle squeezing while simultaneous rotating the handle exactly 90 degrees between each shake. I'm pretty sure bad things would happen if I deviated from that ritual. Nothing bad has ever happened in consequence of adhering to it.

+1
I squeeze the knot and keep wetting it until the water is clear and there are no more suds coming from the middle of the knot. Then I will rewet it with some warm water and then I will shake it out and spin it in my hand.

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 03-22-2020, 06:09 PM
#9
  • naiyor
  • Active Member
  • Ontario, Canada
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I am too immature to take part in this discussion:

"I gently squeeze, then shake, then do several strokes on a towel before putting it away."


...standing giggling at the urinal. 

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 03-23-2020, 06:57 AM
#10
  • ChiefBroom
  • Chief of Dark Holler
  • Fort Collins, Colorado, USA
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(03-22-2020, 06:09 PM)naiyor Wrote: I am too immature to take part in this discussion:

"I gently squeeze, then shake, then do several strokes on a towel before putting it away."


...standing giggling at the urinal. 

Laughing1

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 03-23-2020, 07:37 AM
#11
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(03-23-2020, 06:57 AM)ChiefBroom Wrote:
(03-22-2020, 06:09 PM)naiyor Wrote: I am too immature to take part in this discussion:

"I gently squeeze, then shake, then do several strokes on a towel before putting it away."


...standing giggling at the urinal. 

Laughing1


+1
Shake, rattle & roll

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 03-23-2020, 07:54 AM
#12
  • ChiefBroom
  • Chief of Dark Holler
  • Fort Collins, Colorado, USA
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On a serious note, a few gentle strokes on a towel or your hand also serve to eliminate clumps, which tend to be more pronounced with so-called "gel tips". Allowing badger hair to dry in clumps increases risk of damage to the tips.

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 03-23-2020, 08:53 AM
#13
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(03-22-2020, 06:09 PM)naiyor Wrote: I am too immature to take part in this discussion:

"I gently squeeze, then shake, then do several strokes on a towel before putting it away."


...standing giggling at the urinal. 

24

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 03-23-2020, 11:47 AM
#14
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I rinse throughly then squeeze the excess out then give it a light rub over my shave towel and then give it a good couple shakes and stand to dry, I use to have bristle down but I quit doing that almost two years ago and my brushes all seem fine

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 03-23-2020, 11:55 AM
#15
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
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(03-23-2020, 07:54 AM)ChiefBroom Wrote: On a serious note, a few gentle strokes on a towel or your hand also serve to eliminate clumps, which tend to be more pronounced with so-called "gel tips". Allowing badger hair to dry in clumps increases risk of damage to the tips.

Did knot know this. Thank you.

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 03-24-2020, 07:16 AM
#16
  • BSWoodturning
  • Co-Owner, Brad Sears ShaveWorks
  • Maryland Eastern Shore
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Let's face it:  eliminating water from a brush, like many things in this hobby, boils down to personal preference.   What's important is that the brush is well rinsed before it's set aside to dry.  (I also like to wipe my handles with a towel after each use just to keep them sparkling!)

We recommend rinsing the brush several times, gently squeezing out water and soap each time, repeating until the rinse water runs clear.  We then want to shake out the excess water to the point where the bristles are damp, not sopping wet.  As long as the brush is properly made, shaking -- even with a bit of aggression -- won't hurt it -- as long as we maintain a good grip so the brush doesn't go flying (not that that's ever happened to me  Confused ).  Wiping the bristles with a towel afterwards certainly won't hurt, especially for those in high humidity environments.  Finally, whether you hang your brush from a stand or simply set it on its base makes no difference I've been able to discern.  (But if you like a stand, go for it by all means!)

Enjoy!

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 03-28-2020, 06:15 AM
#17
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(03-24-2020, 07:16 AM)BSWoodturning Wrote: What's important is that the brush is well rinsed before it's set aside to dry.

This is my focus as well, Brad - most of my post-shave time is spent rinsing my brush.  And yes, I do give them a couple shakes and a quick pat with a towel.

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 06-12-2020, 07:24 AM
#18
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Maybe it's best if I squeeze the hairs and then shake the brush.

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 06-12-2020, 01:44 PM
#19
  • SCOV
  • Senior Member
  • Minnesota
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After I rinse the brush, I will gently squeeze the brush to insure all the soap is gone (rinse water is clear).  A few gentle shakes and store. 
If a towel is handy, sometimes a few brush strokes also.

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 06-12-2020, 02:27 PM
#20
  • Puma
  • Senior Member
  • Central Jersey
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(03-24-2020, 07:16 AM)BSWoodturning Wrote: Let's face it:  eliminating water from a brush, like many things in this hobby, boils down to personal preference.   What's important is that the brush is well rinsed before it's set aside to dry.  (I also like to wipe my handles with a towel after each use just to keep them sparkling!)

We recommend rinsing the brush several times, gently squeezing out water and soap each time, repeating until the rinse water runs clear.  We then want to shake out the excess water to the point where the bristles are damp, not sopping wet.  As long as the brush is properly made, shaking -- even with a bit of aggression -- won't hurt it -- as long as we maintain a good grip so the brush doesn't go flying (not that that's ever happened to me  Confused ).  Wiping the bristles with a towel afterwards certainly won't hurt, especially for those in high humidity environments.  Finally, whether you hang your brush from a stand or simply set it on its base makes no difference I've been able to discern.  (But if you like a stand, go for it by all means!)

Enjoy!
Once again I'm in agreement with Brad. I rinse my brushes thoroughly after every shave. I squeeze the knot very gently and not too far down towards the socket. Then I shake it pretty aggressively. I also like to clean the handle.

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