04-15-2020, 08:10 PM
#1
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Pores. We all have them and – at least according to this advertisement that was printed in Illustrated London News in 1899 – they are always open, just waiting for an impure particle to enter so it can mingle with the life-giving current of our blood and kill us… impure particles such as a lesser brand of shaving soap, since – allegedly – nothing comes closer to our skin than the lather we shave with.

[Image: 1899-Illustrated-London-News-Little-Doors.jpg]
From an 1899 Illustrated London News
FUD based advertisement at it’s finest… for starters, I’m not entirely convinced that you could force soap inside your pores with a brush unless you tried very hard – nor am I convinced that pores opens directly into the blood stream… unless a lot of the biology I learned in school was completely off the mark. The worst an impure soap can do is to give you horrible skin problems; clogged pores, acne, pimples, boils, and abscesses… some of which could – in the days before antibiotics and modern medicine – be fatal if left untreated. So I guess whoever wrote the advertisement had a point in that you should avoid soaps with questionable ingredients, even if the explanation is off the mark.
That said, one old shilling for a shaving stick or luxury shaving tablet (and just half that – six pence – for an ‘American shaving tablet’) don’t sounds too bad – until you realised that adjusted for inflation it’s close to 6.50£ or 8.10$ – not expensive, but not cheap either.

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 04-15-2020, 09:11 PM
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I can see this as believable during a time where heroin was given to cure morphine addiction, cocaine for toothaches, and snake oil was sold (literal oil made from Chinese water snakes). Alas, this was also a time of figurative snake oil as medical understanding was quite immature.

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 04-16-2020, 06:29 AM
#3
  • RyznRio
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  • Connecticut
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(04-15-2020, 09:11 PM)mike_the_kraken Wrote: I can see this as believable during a time where heroin was given to cure morphine addiction, cocaine for toothaches, and snake oil was sold (literal oil made from Chinese water snakes). Alas, this was also a time of figurative snake oil as medical understanding was quite immature.

well not too much has changed at least not in the US...

Methadone is given to cure heroin addiction. methadone is as or more addictive than heroin. Unlike heroin, Methadone strips calcium out of your body leaving you toothless and brittle while still addicted to an opiate. It's just harder to overdose on methadone.
cocaine is used to numb the eye during an operation or invasive testing on the eye.
As an acupuncturist, I can attest that snake oil is still used in some herbal formulas. 3 snake wine is also readily available, basically snakes marinated in hi proof vodka. quite tasty (really)
and with all our modern medical understanding and hi tech equipment, Covid-19 is kicking our collective ass.

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 04-16-2020, 08:52 AM
#4
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(04-16-2020, 06:29 AM)RyznRio Wrote:
(04-15-2020, 09:11 PM)mike_the_kraken Wrote: I can see this as believable during a time where heroin was given to cure morphine addiction, cocaine for toothaches, and snake oil was sold (literal oil made from Chinese water snakes). Alas, this was also a time of figurative snake oil as medical understanding was quite immature.

well not too much has changed at least not in the US...

Methadone is given to cure heroin addiction. methadone is as or more addictive than heroin. Unlike heroin, Methadone strips calcium out of your body leaving you toothless and brittle while still addicted to an opiate. It's just harder to overdose on methadone.
cocaine is used to numb the eye during an operation or invasive testing on the eye.
As an acupuncturist, I can attest that snake oil is still used in some herbal formulas. 3 snake wine is also readily available, basically snakes marinated in hi proof vodka. quite tasty (really)
and with all our modern medical understanding and hi tech equipment, Covid-19 is kicking our collective ass.

First, let’s please leave COVID-19 out of it, as it has nothing to do with this post and gets enough airtime without being brought into every thread.

Medical knowledge has vastly improved over the years, that’s not even debatable. I have personally had my eyes operated on, and the doctors did not use cocaine - instead they use synthetic local anesthetics such as tetracaine and proparacaine. I’m not saying that it’s medicinal use is impossible (as cocaine derivatives may still be used as a topical numbing agent in the mouth), but the use in eyes is highly discouraged and better alternatives have existed for quite some time. The same goes for snake oil - the argument that because it still has some uses, it’s as prolific as it was during the late 1800’s/early 1900’s is just silly. In the USA today - literal snake oil isn’t peddled commonly (though figurative snake oil exists in different forms). RE how much has changed, consider the lifespan in the USA in 1900 (48) vs. today (78). While nutrition, occupation, and hazardous material exposure have a lot to do with that - medical advances contribute significantly. Everything from preventative heart surgery, recovery from a stroke, and vaccine effectiveness (when was the last time we worried about the measles or polio?). Our medical understanding and implementation need not be perfect to demonstrate significant advances.

My argument was that it was both common and accepted to use compounds like heroin, cocaine, and snake-oil in medicinal ways during a period of history where medical knowledge was still in its infancy, and therefore thinking that harmful foreign agents could enter through pores would be believable at that time.

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 04-16-2020, 10:12 AM
#5
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(04-16-2020, 08:52 AM)mike_the_kraken Wrote: My argument was that it was both common and accepted to use compounds like heroin, cocaine, and snake-oil in medicinal ways during a period of history where medical knowledge was still in its infancy, and therefore thinking that harmful foreign agents could enter through pores would be believable at that time.

Case in point; heroin and cocaine was marked as wonder-drugs for children and adults alike - toothaches and coughs just disappeared with a little drop...
[Image: Cocaine_tooth_drops-1.png]
[Image: a6bdc749ea7c58c2e44a559b.jpg]
(Sidenote: Had a wicked cough a few years back, and got prescribed cough medicine based on ethylmorphine-hydroclorid... killed the cough in two days flat)

An educated man would likely not have believed that pores opened into his bloodstream, but the average man? Yeah.. he might believe it - otherwise the advertisement probably wouldn't have been made in that format. Still fun to snark at 120 years later Smile

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 04-16-2020, 02:41 PM
#6
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Reminds me of one of my favorite movies set in that era: Tombstone. In that, Wyatt Earp’ s wife (Maddie Blaylock) is addicted to Laudanum, freely dispensed to treat coughs or headaches - the latter of which she suffered. This was also the period where Doc Holliday lived with, and ultimately succumbed to tuberculosis. I suppose in the late 1800’s you just did the best you could and got on livin’

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 04-16-2020, 03:47 PM
#7
  • 2Chops
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  • North Central PA
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"That said, one old shilling for a shaving stick or luxury shaving tablet (and just half that – six pence – for an ‘American shaving tablet’) don’t sounds too bad – until you realised that adjusted for inflation it’s close to 6.50£ or 8.10$ – not expensive, but not cheap either."


A puck of Williams can be had for just $.99 at our local Wegmans.  Absolute safety for less than a buck.  YAHTZEE!

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 04-16-2020, 05:23 PM
#8
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(04-16-2020, 02:41 PM)mike_the_kraken Wrote: Reminds me of one of my favorite movies set in that era: Tombstone. In that, Wyatt Earp’ s wife (Maddie Blaylock) is addicted to Laudanum, freely dispensed to treat coughs or headaches - the latter of which she suffered. This was also the period where Doc Holliday lived with, and ultimately succumbed to tuberculosis. I suppose in the late 1800’s you just did the best you could and got on livin’

Tombstone.  One of the best Western movies!

Indeed, Laudanum, which is an opiate, was available without a prescription in the 1800's.

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 04-16-2020, 06:14 PM
#9
  • chazt
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  • Queens, NY
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(04-16-2020, 03:47 PM)2Chops Wrote: "That said, one old shilling for a shaving stick or luxury shaving tablet (and just half that – six pence – for an ‘American shaving tablet’) don’t sounds too bad – until you realised that adjusted for inflation it’s close to 6.50£ or 8.10$ – not expensive, but not cheap either."


A puck of Williams can be had for just $.99 at our local Wegmans.  Absolute safety for less than a buck.  YAHTZEE!

I bought a puck in the supermarket (because it was there) a few months ago and stashed it in the drawer. Took it out after seeing this thread, thinking I’d give it another go. Holy smokes! What happened to the scent? I don’t remember it smelling like this, even just five or so years when I last bought a puck. Sheesh! Was it always like this? Seriously, this new puck smells like a urinal cake.

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 04-17-2020, 01:22 AM
#10
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Skin: to begin with, there are quite a few substances which can and do get from your skin to your blood stream.

Methadone: this substance in itself certainly has drawbacks. Giving drug addicts free methadone otherwise has a few pros, too.
Drug addicts do not have to do criminal acts to pay for their drugs.
Less problems with hepatitis and other infections.
I am not an expert on drug withdrawal, but several years ago had planned a program for ultra rapid opioid withdrawal with naloxone, propofol anaesthesia and invasive monitoring on my then ICU. 

Yes, the history of medicine has quite a few astonishing mistakes, when seen with today’s eyes.
Don’t you forget the opioid crisis.

But we continue to get better.

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 04-18-2020, 11:42 AM
#11
  • 2Chops
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(04-16-2020, 06:14 PM)chazt Wrote:
(04-16-2020, 03:47 PM)2Chops Wrote: "That said, one old shilling for a shaving stick or luxury shaving tablet (and just half that – six pence – for an ‘American shaving tablet’) don’t sounds too bad – until you realised that adjusted for inflation it’s close to 6.50£ or 8.10$ – not expensive, but not cheap either."


A puck of Williams can be had for just $.99 at our local Wegmans.  Absolute safety for less than a buck.  YAHTZEE!

I bought a puck in the supermarket (because it was there) a few months ago and stashed it in the drawer. Took it out after seeing this thread, thinking I’d give it another go. Holy smokes! What happened to the scent? I don’t remember it smelling like this, even just five or so years when I last bought a puck. Sheesh! Was it always like this? Seriously, this new puck smells like a urinal cake.

I had heard this about the Williams soap.  I saw a vid on YT by mantic59 I think it was, about testing the Williams.  He said the same thing about the odor.  For a buck it's worth a go.  If the smell is too offensive, you could either use a decent after shave or toss it in the can.  Or toss it in a urinal at the nearest watering hole.

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 04-25-2020, 07:50 AM
#12
  • 2Chops
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  • North Central PA
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So I got a puck of the Williams.  Been using it this past week.  Not bad in my newbie experience.  Much better than the canned gel I used to use.  The aroma is different. Not horrible.  Not nearly as potent on the brush as it was in the box & mug.  I've heard the smell described as like a citronella bug candle.  A better mental image than urinal pee cake. Looking to get some better soaps & tube creams soon to compare.

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 04-27-2020, 02:33 PM
#13
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(04-15-2020, 08:10 PM)WegianWarrior Wrote: Pores. We all have them and – at least according to this advertisement that was printed in Illustrated London News in 1899 – they are always open, just waiting for an impure particle to enter so it can mingle with the life-giving current of our blood and kill us… impure particles such as a lesser brand of shaving soap, since – allegedly – nothing comes closer to our skin than the lather we shave with.


[Image: 1899-Illustrated-London-News-Little-Doors.jpg]
From an 1899 Illustrated London News
FUD based advertisement at it’s finest… for starters, I’m not entirely convinced that you could force soap inside your pores with a brush unless you tried very hard – nor am I convinced that pores opens directly into the blood stream… unless a lot of the biology I learned in school was completely off the mark. The worst an impure soap can do is to give you horrible skin problems; clogged pores, acne, pimples, boils, and abscesses… some of which could – in the days before antibiotics and modern medicine – be fatal if left untreated. So I guess whoever wrote the advertisement had a point in that you should avoid soaps with questionable ingredients, even if the explanation is off the mark.
That said, one old shilling for a shaving stick or luxury shaving tablet (and just half that – six pence – for an ‘American shaving tablet’) don’t sounds too bad – until you realised that adjusted for inflation it’s close to 6.50£ or 8.10$ – not expensive, but not cheap either.
Love it, Hans. I am currently titanicing my way through a puck of the original Williams and it is an exceptionally great soap. I know there are those who will thinkI am full of it, but it mos def rivals every soap on the market today. 

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