07-22-2020, 09:49 AM
#1
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Hello Gents,
Has anyone used Renaissance Wax on a metal razor?
I would like to use it on the top cap, base plate and handle of brass, stainless and bronze.
I understand that some have used this stuff on brush handles?
Any input?
Pete

[Image: m7yfOw0.jpg]

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 07-22-2020, 10:57 AM
#2
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I have used it on carbon steel straight razor blades, and wooden scales. I've also used it on Charcoal Goods brass handles, top caps, and base plates. Good stuff.

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 07-22-2020, 11:10 AM
#3
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Thank You Jimmy!
How often do you replace the wax?

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 07-22-2020, 01:57 PM
#4
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This is good stuff that I put on brass, bronze, and copper razors to prevent darkening/patina. I replace the wax every 3-6 months depending on usage.

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 07-22-2020, 04:40 PM
#5
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That is what Brian from Charcoal Goods recommends for his copper and brass razors

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 07-22-2020, 05:01 PM
#6
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Somehow, I like the patina on my brass Karve CB.  I would like to keep my previously-antiqued brass Blackbird/Charcoal Goods and bronze Timeless razors pristine.  I have been known to slop shaving lather and H2O on just about everything.  
I’m going try this mysterious wax.
Thank you for all the feedback. 
Much appreciated.
Pete

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 07-22-2020, 06:44 PM
#7
  • SCOV
  • Senior Member
  • Minnesota
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(07-22-2020, 04:40 PM)Shavemd Wrote: That is what Brian from Charcoal Goods recommends for his copper and brass razors


+1.  I have used on CG copper and brass razors.   I have not seen used on stainless and no idea if it may protect a polished finish.
Nice product.

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 07-23-2020, 12:49 AM
#8
  • ischiapp
  • Senior Member
  • Forio d'Ischia, Naples, Italy
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I used.
A Mod from italian forum ilRasoio pointed me years ago, about prevent oxidation and color changing.
I loved the products, but I find not so easy to use.
After read guns and swords forums, now I use WD40 spray with a soft cloth.
Cheap, easy, and do not difference.

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 07-23-2020, 07:35 AM
#9
  • hush
  • Junior Member
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I put it on CG razors in brass.

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 07-23-2020, 09:00 AM
#10
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I find that it works well on brass and copper razor handles (as well as on bone, ivory, and wood brush handles), but it is very difficult to get the excess out of grooves and knurling. That's not really important unless one is very particular about the appearance.

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 07-23-2020, 02:45 PM
#11
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been using it for years. dries and polishes differently than most waxes.  analogy:  turtle shell vs buttery.  England's royal museum uses it and so do I

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 07-25-2020, 04:34 PM
#12
  • MrGuy
  • Member
  • Black Hills of SD
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I’ve been using it for quite a long time on all kinds of things. On the shaving side of things it’s used on razors, brush handles, any soap container labels that feel like they’re at risk from water exposure, and all kind of other items. Purchase price felt a little steep when I bought my first tin, but the minuscule amount that needs to be used per application along with the longevity of each application makes it a very economical product. Keep in mind it’s not a cleaning or abrasive wax at all. What you see on the item before use is what you’ll see after use. Any polishing you want will need to be completed via another product first. Also, be sure you have a nice wide opening window near by during use.

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 07-25-2020, 04:39 PM
#13
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(07-25-2020, 04:34 PM)MrGuy Wrote: I’ve been using it for quite a long time on all kinds of things. On the shaving side of things it’s used on razors, brush handles, any soap container labels that feel like they’re at risk from water exposure, and all kind of other items. Purchase price felt a little steep when I bought my first tin, but the minuscule amount that needs to be used per application along with the longevity of each application makes it a very economical product. Keep in mind it’s not a cleaning or abrasive wax at all. What you see on the item before use is what you’ll see after use. Any polishing you want will need to be completed via another product first. Also, be sure you have a nice wide opening window near by during use.

Excellent advice, thank you!
Do I apply it with a microfiber cloth?  Apply it, let it dry and wipe off the haze?  Like car wax?

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 07-25-2020, 04:48 PM
#14
  • SCOV
  • Senior Member
  • Minnesota
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The open window advice is really good.  The can and website have advice on applying the wax.  

I used a small rag cut from socks or t-shirt. I think I left the wax on but tried to remove excess wax.

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 07-25-2020, 05:03 PM
#15
  • MrGuy
  • Member
  • Black Hills of SD
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I’ve used about every type of cloth I have, but I’m with SCOV in finding t-shirt strips to work the best. Seems like any texture found in the cloth leaves a noticeable (just barely) imprint in the wax that’s difficult to remove without applying a fresh coat. I apply with a strip of t-shirt doubled up and pulled taught around a finger tip, buff the product in well, flip to a dry portion of cloth and continue buffing. It dries (flashes is maybe a better word) relatively quickly and I find if you continuously buff while it flashes rather that letting it sit it’s much easier to avoid using too much. That’s the way I like to use it, but not the only way by any means.

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 07-25-2020, 05:08 PM
#16
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Cool!  Thanks guys!

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