09-08-2020, 12:40 PM
#1
  • 2Chops
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  • North Central PA
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I have this vintage straight razor that has a small nick on the end.  I plan on working it into my shave routine to get more comfortable with using a straight.  I've used it a couple of times and haven't had an issue yet.  But I would rather do something to make it safer and better to look at.  I've been thinking of lightly grinding the nick out.  Rounding that corner a bit in the process.  Any of you done this?  Or do you counsel otherwise?  I'm not a clod and have done this sort of touch up before.  Looking for input.  Thanks.
[Image: MDJ1MyU.jpg]

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 09-08-2020, 01:48 PM
#2
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When you say "grinding," what do you have in mind?  I would not use a grinding wheel or power tool of any sort.  Not even a Dremel.  What I would consider trying is a coarse whetstone.  You'll need a grit below 1000.  

We have some guys with expertise on razor repair and restoration, and hopefully they'll add their thoughts.

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 09-08-2020, 02:24 PM
#3
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I'd kill the edge, mute the tip and sharpen as normal 3-4 times and see how much is gone. 
If that doesn't cut, I'd send it to a honemeister as I'd not do anything more aggressive at the risk of a radical change on its built in angles.

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 09-08-2020, 02:57 PM
#4
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(09-08-2020, 01:48 PM)TheLegalRazor Wrote: When you say "grinding," what do you have in mind?  I would not use a grinding wheel or power tool of any sort.  Not even a Dremel.  What I would consider trying is a coarse whetstone.  You'll need a grit below 1000.  

We have some guys with expertise on razor repair and restoration, and hopefully they'll add their thoughts.

No intention of using a power tool of any kind.  I was thinking a course whet stone and moving up in fineness to re hone like you had mentioned.

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 09-08-2020, 03:00 PM
#5
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(09-08-2020, 02:24 PM)lloydrm Wrote: I'd kill the edge, mute the tip and sharpen as normal 3-4 times and see how much is gone. 
If that doesn't cut, I'd send it to a honemeister as I'd not do anything more aggressive at the risk of a radical change on its built in angles.

Thanks.  In the course of the rehone, I figure if I can't get it just right I'll send it off to Razor Emporium and let them work their magic.  But I wanted to take a crack at it first if it seemed like a workable idea.

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 09-17-2020, 06:26 PM
#6
  • 2Chops
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First shave tonight with the touched up blade.  If yiu zoom into the toe, you can see how much better it is.  Used a series of stones to remove the chips and then get the edge as close to true shave sharp with what I had.  Stroped it a bunch before tonight's shave.  Still needs some more hone time.  But it'll get the job done.
[Image: 9411yPl.jpg]

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 09-28-2020, 09:37 AM
#7
  • u2u
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Congrats... looks like you made the best of it. Well done!

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 09-29-2020, 05:29 AM
#8
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Late to post but my recommendation would be to tape the spine and work the edge on a slurried 1K until the chip is gone which should not take much then remove the tape and run thru a normal progression

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