09-30-2012, 02:07 PM
#1
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13/16 random pattern damascus. I hammered out the rough shape by hand. Then finished the shape on the grinder.
Scales are black G10 with tru-stone wedge. SS stacked washers and silver pins
I'm real happy with with the overall shape and total weight of the razor.
I was shooting for a overall weight similar to a Filly #13.
My original scaled Filly DT#13 has a weight of 49 grams. My razor came in a 52 grams.
At least I got pretty close

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 09-30-2012, 02:12 PM
#2
  • Tonality
  • Attempted Soap Sabbatical
  • Boston
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Wow! An impressive and beautiful looking razor,quite a tail too!

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 09-30-2012, 03:29 PM
#3
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Nice! Is it a commission?

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 09-30-2012, 06:18 PM
#4
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Have you honed it and is it shave ready?

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 09-30-2012, 09:07 PM
#5
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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That is very nice.

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 10-01-2012, 04:32 AM
#6
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A lovely pattern in your Damascus steel, I do like the French point, by the way what steel are you using, PS I've always wondered what the custom knife maker William Henry would come up with if he managed to get round to making a straight razor, because the patterns on some of those knives are amazing.
http://www.heinnie.com/Knives/William-He...-203-4160/

Jamie

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 10-01-2012, 05:56 AM
#7
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Thanks for the the nice words.

Lee - This wasn't a commissioned piece. Just one I've was working on.

lindyhop66 - Yes, I've honed and shaved with it a couple of times.

Jamie - The Henry knife is a looker. The Damascus is a low layer Damascus. Which has nothing to do with quality..lol. It just has to do with the number of times it was folded. Looks as if wasn't folded as many times as some others, which leads to fewer but bigger, bolder lines.

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 10-01-2012, 07:24 AM
#8
  • Leon
  • Active Member
  • Porto, Portugal
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Good work, congrats.

That shinny part on the lower side of the blade is the bevel or it's just a different pattern?

As far as I've seen on other damascus blades, the lower part would look different than the rest. I'm not sure why, since I never made a damascus blade Biggrin

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 10-01-2012, 09:59 AM
#9
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Leon,
The shinny part is the bevel.
There are a few different types of damascus (pattern welded steel)
The one I used in this razor is a solid billet, a combination of 1095 & 15n20 (the most common steel used for high carbon damascus)
Then there is some that are damascus billet with a solid steel core inserted into the center.
Then you have another that is a solid center core with a damascus / layered steel on each side of the core. So it's made of 3 separate pieces (San Mai steel)

For those that don't know. The damascus part you see, for the most part, isn't visible until the blade is etched in a acid bath. Think of it like a patina. The acid reacts to each steel in the billet at a different rate. That is why you have dark lines and light line. But this etching can be sanded / ground through. So once you hone the razor, your honing through the etched layer, back down to what looks like a normal steel.

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 10-01-2012, 12:36 PM
#10
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Well, you can still see it, you just have to look close and have a lot of contrast.

Check out the old Nihontos to see what I'm talking about. The togishi do not etch the steel in any way. Although they do use finger stones to do something to the steel. AFAIK, it's a really high polish stone, but I really don't know for sure.

Not sure what Leon is saying about the bottom half, but Milemarker has explained it.

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 10-01-2012, 05:23 PM
#11
  • oscar11
  • Senior Member
  • North Dakota
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That's just nice, very nice.

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 10-02-2012, 02:10 AM
#12
  • Leon
  • Active Member
  • Porto, Portugal
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Hi.

(10-01-2012, 12:36 PM)asharperrazor Wrote: Not sure what Leon is saying about the bottom half, but Milemarker has explained it.

I can see clearly a distinct steel near the edge, so I asked if this was a pattern, or was the actual edge.

(10-01-2012, 09:59 AM)MileMarker60 Wrote: For those that don't know. The damascus part you see, for the most part, isn't visible until the blade is etched in a acid bath. Think of it like a patina. The acid reacts to each steel in the billet at a different rate. That is why you have dark lines and light line. But this etching can be sanded / ground through. So once you hone the razor, your honing through the etched layer, back down to what looks like a normal steel.

This is interesting. So, what you're saying is that, although the 2 steels are welded and "smeared" together throught the entire blade, the acid bath only gives the contrast in the surface of the blade, so if we hone it and remove the surface layer of steel, the steel beneath will not have that etching.

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 10-02-2012, 05:41 AM
#13
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Bruno,
You are correct, the etch is only on the surface. That being said it can steel cause a few problems at the thinnest area (ie edge). If the edge isn't protected in some way the etching process can create pitting at the edge (which can be a problem).
The is one of the best reason to use a solid core or at least a solid edge. With those you don't have to worry as much about any pitting.

Here is a pic of a scrap piece of twisted damascus.
I cleaned it up with a 900 grit belt on the grinder, then etched part of it. It should give you a better idea.
This was etch for about 1 min. The long you leave it in the solution the deep the etch.

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 10-02-2012, 11:28 AM
#14
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(10-02-2012, 02:10 AM)Leon Wrote: This is interesting. So, what you're saying is that, although the 2 steels are welded and "smeared" together throught the entire blade, the acid bath only gives the contrast in the surface of the blade, so if we hone it and remove the surface layer of steel, the steel beneath will not have that etching.

Yup. And his picture shows you. However, you can polish the steel to bring it out too, but it will never be as contrasted.

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 10-03-2012, 01:32 PM
#15
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What a beautiful razor! Every time i see one like this, i am always tempted to try straights again. Hee hee.

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 10-03-2012, 01:51 PM
#16
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(10-03-2012, 01:32 PM)celestino Wrote: What a beautiful razor! Every time i see one like this, i am always tempted to try straights again. Hee hee.

I've got a couple you can borrow. Just saying....

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