02-21-2022, 12:13 AM
#1
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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I have seen one of these in brown bakelite (why did I pass it up?) and one in green, but red? Wow!

Anyway, it is on its way to me for me to admire in close, personal detail. Here’s hoping you’ll enjoy it, too!

[Image: euGUP6O.jpg]
[Image: NHQcgaH.jpg]

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 02-21-2022, 05:30 AM
#2
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Very nice Smile

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 02-21-2022, 05:50 AM
#3
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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(02-21-2022, 05:30 AM)WegianWarrior Wrote: Very nice Smile
It is, yes. The 1788 date is now the subject of significant controversy, as it commemorates the arrival of what Australians know as ‘The First Fleet’ (British convicts) but is not celebrated by all, as it was also the first step toward dispossession (and tremendous suffering) of Aboriginal peoples. For many, Australia Day (26 January) is regarded as a day of mourning. On Australia Day 1938 - the year of make of this razor - the first "Day of Mourning" assembly was held by a small group of Aboriginal men and women at Australian Hall, 150 Pitt St, Sydney. It marked 150 years of white settlement.

So while the year 1788 is significant in Australia, it is significant for different reasons for different people. 

In 2028, this set will be 90 years old, and will, as it does now, serve as a reminder that historical ‘facts’ evolve and remain open to interpretation over time. The controversy does not change the object in terms of its outward form, but it does ‘transform’ it and in the process raise interesting and important questions, ones that I, for one, am glad to be involved in thinking about and discussing. 

So, there is more than one way to look at an object: aesthetic, historic, economic, and so on. Seeing things this way imbues the object with a kind of fourth dimension, as it were. And I like that.

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 02-21-2022, 09:49 AM
#4
  • chazt
  • Super Moderator
  • Queens, NY
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More history! I love artifacts and education. It’s a good one, for sure. Enjoy!

Thanks for sharing, Shaun Smile

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 02-21-2022, 02:32 PM
#5
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Good find, Shaun.

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 02-21-2022, 10:26 PM
#6
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(02-21-2022, 05:50 AM)Shaun Wrote:
(02-21-2022, 05:30 AM)WegianWarrior Wrote: Very nice Smile
It is, yes. The 1788 date is now the subject of significant controversy, as it commemorates the arrival of what Australians know as ‘The First Fleet’ (British convicts) but is not celebrated by all, as it was also the first step toward dispossession (and tremendous suffering) of Aboriginal peoples. For many, Australia Day (26 January) is regarded as a day of mourning. On Australia Day 1938 - the year of make of this razor - the first "Day of Mourning" assembly was held by a small group of Aboriginal men and women at Australian Hall, 150 Pitt St, Sydney. It marked 150 years of white settlement.

So while the year 1788 is significant in Australia, it is significant for different reasons for different people. 

In 2028, this set will be 90 years old, and will, as it does now, serve as a reminder that historical ‘facts’ evolve and remain open to interpretation over time. The controversy does not change the object in terms of its outward form, but it does ‘transform’ it and in the process raise interesting and important questions, ones that I, for one, am glad to be involved in thinking about and discussing. 

So, there is more than one way to look at an object: aesthetic, historic, economic, and so on. Seeing things this way imbues the object with a kind of fourth dimension, as it were. And I like that.

And context just made it even better. Thank you Shaun, for making me smile this morning.

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 02-22-2022, 09:28 AM
#7
  • Bax
  • Active Member
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Kinda like Columbus Day in America.  Some folks call it racist.  Others call it anti-racist.  History (and context) can be educational sometimes.


   The first national Columbus Day was proclaimed in 1892 by President Benjamin Harrison to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Italian-born explorer Christopher Columbus’s supposed discovery of America.
But for Harrison, it wasn't REALLY about recognizing Columbus... it was about repairing damage with Italy after the largest single mass lynching in US history, when 11 Italian-Americans were murdered more or less because they were Italians.  By recognizing an Italian hero, it would help resolve an international diplomatic crisis with Italy, regain some support from Italian-American voters, and undo some of the damage that had been done already, and solve some other problems Harrison faced. 
     In March 1891, a jury in New Orleans acquitted six Italian immigrants whom officials had rounded up and charged with the murder of the local police chief.  It seems some powerful immigrant family had killed the police chief, but the frenzied racist  mob rounded up Italians pretty indiscriminately and put them on trial.  Not surprisingly, all of the hapless Italians were acquitted.   The local newspapers (specifically the New Orleans Times-Democrat)  fueled the fire and whipped the people into an anti-Italian frenzy.  Soon thousands of people descended on Orleans Parish Prison, where the six Italian defendants and 13 other Italian suspects were still being held.  A group of armed men broke into the prison and shot nine of the defendants dead, one falling with 42 bullets in his body.  The mob took two others to the city square, when one man was hanged on a lamp post and another on a tree.   The New Orleans Times-Democrat reported with glee, claiming the police chief had  now been "avenged."  
     During this time, there was widespread discrimination against Italian immigrants.  Many news reports jumped on board with the New Orleans Times-Democrat and echoed how "just" the murders were, and how the mob did what the law failed to do.  Keep in mind, all these now-dead Italians had already been acquitted!  (There was probably a "hit man" out there somewhere, but it wasn't one of the Italians who'd been rounded up and murdered.)   The Associated Press immediately took the side of the racist murderers, reporting “It was not an unruly midnight mob. It was simply a sullen determined body of citizens who took into their own hands what justice had ignominiously failed to do.”  The New York Times wrote that “while every good citizen” would agree that “this affair is to be deplored, it would be difficult to find any individual who would confess that privately he deplores it very much.”   Even the (then)  U.S. Civil Service Commissioner Theodore Roosevelt, in a letter to his sister, said of the revengeful violence, “Personally, I think it a rather good thing.”  (Teddy Roosevelt wasn't one to have much sympathy for his "lessers" anyway, and he didn't consider Italian immigrants to be his equals.)  Read up on Teddy Roosevelt.  He was quite a guy (sarcasm).
     Needless to say, the Italians (and the Italian-American community) were furious.  At this juncture, Italy was a nation that was strong enough to have its voice heard.  The U.S. government simply HAD to respond.  Harrison paid off the Italian government, which immediately outraged the anti-Italian American population, some of whom had lynched the innocent men.  Harrison's payment to Italy did nothing to appease the anger of the Italian-American community.  Harrison had a real problem now.  He couldn't seem to appease anyone, no matter how hard he tried!  He also faced an upcoming reelection.  He had to win over Italian diplomats (the Italian Ambassadors had already been recalled to Italy in protest of the mass murder of Italian-Americans, and a big political international mess was unfolding).  He also needed support of the Italian-American voters.  He needed a way to recognize how important the Italians were for the "melting pot" of America, and a way to commemorate Italian contributions to the New World.  He faced a very difficult dilemma.
     As luck would have it, it was approaching the 400th anniversary of Columbus’s arrival in the New World.  A New York minister, Francis Bellamy (a "Christian Socialist" who also authored the Pledge of Allegiance), had been pestering Harrison to come up with some kind of holiday to promote patriotism in schools.  The stars aligned, and Harrison got a Great Idea!  He called upon Congress to pass a resolution calling for a one-time holiday for Americans to celebrate Columbus on Oct. 21 “by public demonstration and by suitable exercises in their schools and other places of assembly.”   Harrison issued his proclamation on July 21, urging efforts to “impress upon our youth the patriotic duties of American citizenship.”  This was intended to placate the Italian government, the Italian-American voters, and would keep Francis Bellamy from pestering him. 
     Celebrations took place across the country.  The NY parade boasted over a million spectators and 40,000 soldiers marching in the parade.  Pretty impressive for 1891!  There were even 1,000 Native Americans marching in the parade, with both everyday attire and some adorned proudly with ceremonial attire.  It was a huge festival for everyone! 
     The next day, a crowd gathered for the unveiling of a 14-foot statue of Columbus atop a 27.5-foot granite column; it's still there in Columbus Circle (it's a traffic circle today).  The carved marble figure of Columbus was made in Italy by the sculptor Gaetano Russo, and was donated by the Italian government.  Even the costs of site preparation was donated by Italy.  Italy was THRILLED with the new holiday in America, and Harrison's salve mended the wound with Italy, who quickly sent back its Ambassadors and friendly relations resumed.
     Harrison's "Columbus Day" was a huge success across the board.  Unfortunately, Harrison bowed out of practically everything around that time, and didn't benefit much from his masterful coup, as his wife was dying of tuberculosis, and he began to focus on her impending death more than politics.  Needless to say, Cleveland beat the pants off of Harrison in the next election (because Cleveland was campaigning with passion and zeal while Harrison was preoccupied with family issues). 
      Columbus Day, originally a "one time good deal,"  was celebrated at many local levels, but wasn't yet a National Holiday.  All that changed in 1934 when Congress authorized President Franklin D. Roosevelt to declare Oct. 12 as Columbus Day; now it was a recognized day on the calendar.  It wasn't until 1971, when Columbus Day was made a no-kidding, permanent Federal Holiday on the second Monday in October.
  
Some call it racist, others call it anti-racist. 
Depends on your inclination and point-of-view, I guess. 
Kinda like the commemorative Aussie GEM razor set.
The optics always depend on the lens.

:-)
- Historian Bax

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 02-22-2022, 04:16 PM
#8
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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Advertisement, The Daily Telegraph, February 1938. On the SAME page, an image of the middleweight boxer, Atilio Sabatino, backgrounded by a deeply offensive racist image. 
[Image: V9aYJcP.jpg]
[Image: VaCwdvo.jpg]

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