03-06-2022, 07:32 AM
#1
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
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We are entering the home stretch of our annual Pulaski Day Sale. If you use coupon code Pulaski at checkout, you will save 15% on most items through 11:59 PM on Monday, March 7th. The notable exceptions are Barbaros Razors, Mergress Razors and Clearance Items. If you have had your eye on a new razor, brush, soap or cologne, now is the time to spring into action. 

[Image: f3kU0a9.jpg]

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 03-07-2022, 08:43 AM
#2
  • Bax
  • Active Member
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I had to google it.  
     This "Pulaski Day" thing honors Casmir Pulaski (1745-1779).  Pulaski's family had a history of fighting against the Turks in the 17th Century until the Russians invaded Poland around the time of the American Revolution.  Casmir's family were all nobility, so they weren't keen on Russians upsetting their apple cart.  Casmir joined up with some dissidents and was part of the rebellion against the Russians.  The rebellion failed, so he fled to France.  As a nobleman who supported the rebellion, it probably wouldn't' have been healthy for him to remain in Poland at that point. 
     In Paris, Casmir came across a seedy looking bar next to a very affordable cathouse called Classy Lassies.  He bellied up to the bar next to a chubby balding fellow with a ponytail and started to introduce himself, when the chubby fellow unexpectedly barfed on the floor.  You see, the chubby fellow drank far too much and was busy puking, so Casmir thoughtfully held the guy's ponytail while he puked.  It seems the lush had been on a "diplomatic mission" to the cathouse next door and stopped by the bar on his way back to his hotel.  
     After the chubby reveler was done spewing Sam Adams ale all over the floor, they introduced themselves.  "I'm Casmir Pulaski."  "I'm Benjamin Franklin." and they shook hands.*  Benjamin Franklin convinced Casmir Pulaski to go to the Colonies and join the rebels in the revolution.  After all, he couldn't very well go back to Poland or the Russians would get him!
    Ben Franklin always chewed on a flower known as "Trillium Erectum" (also known as the Red Trillium) because the Little Blue Pill hadn't been invented yet.  Since Ben always seemed to have disgusting smelly vomit on his vest while chewing it, the flower came to be colloquially known as the "Stinking Benjamin."   But that's another story.*  Anyway, Ben and Casmir became fast friends and (after visiting Classy Lassies one more time) went off to the Americas.
    Casmir bought a horse and said he'd take charge of a cavalry unit, dropping lots of fancy Nobility Words to impress the uncouth locals.  It worked!  The old cavalry commander (Colonel Elmo Fernblatt) had been a farmer rather than nobility, and his plow horse didn't look as cool as Casmir's black Arabian mare, so Elmo was kicked to the curb, and was quietly replace by Casmir.*   Casmir's first battle came at the Battle of Brandywine (fought because the British Oppressors threatened to occupy a distillery there that was one of Ben Franklin's favorites).*  Miffed that he'd been replaced as the Cavalry commander by this European dandy, now-demoted Colonel Elmo Fernblatt put a burr under the snooty Polish nobleman's saddle.  When Pulaski mounted his horse, it ran frantically (and coincidentally) toward the British!  The rest of the cavalrymen spurred their mounts in an effort to catch up!  The Brits weren't expecting this crazy charge in a formation they'd never seen before, led by a madman waving his arms, kicking his feet, and screaming "ZAT OR ZMAK!" at the top of his lungs!  The Brits didn't understand what the heck he was yelling, but they sure didn't want to get ZMACKED, so they broke and ran!    ("Zatrzymać" means "Stop!" in Polish). 
    Ben thanked George Washington for saving the winery after Casmir scared away the British (who didn't want to get zmacked upside the head), so they made Casmir a Brigadier General... for his tenacity and aggressiveness in battle.* History records that Casmir's "courageous charge in this engagement averted a disastrous defeat of the American Cavalry and likely saved the life of George Washington.”  
   In the next battle, the Battle of Savannah in 1779, Pulaski led another charge against the British.  This time he MEANT to do it.  He wanted to show off his new uniform and fancy shoulder braid.*  Unfortunately, before he reached the British lines where the British officers were visibly adorned with shiny medals and braid, he was blown from his horse by a volley of shrapnel!  Unfortunately, this turn of events prevented him from making the Brits jealous of his much more ornate uniform.  Sadly, he developed gangrene from the shrapnel wounds and died two days later, on Oct. 11.  
   Casmir Pulaski is one of many non-Americans who played a role in the American Revolution.  One thing all of these people had in common was a love of freedom and liberty that still comprises the fabric of most of America, even today.  There is a big Polish community in Chicago, Illinois.  They came up with Casmir Pulaski Day back in 1983 to commemorate Casmir's birthday on the 1st Monday of March.  At the Federal level, there is a "General Pulaski Memorial Day" as well, that commemorates Pulaski's death.  Pulaski's birthday has been a school holiday in Illinois since 1986.  
    While largely unknown in most of the country, the day is especially emphasized in cities like Chicago and Bloomington which have sizable Polish populations, and Pulaski Day is a very important celebratory event (kinda like Columbus Day is for Italians)!  Rapper Kidd Russell even has a rap song about it:  "Pulaski Day, Pulaski Day, we gonna party like Pulaski Day..." 
    Meanwhile, Ben Franklin's favorite cathouse in Paris fell into disrepair and has changed hands many times since 1776.  Today it is a thriving dog grooming business owned by a nice couple from Scotland who call it "Classy Lassies."*
  :-)
- Bax

*Some of the above is true.  The fun parts I made up.  
You can probably tell which is which...

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 03-07-2022, 10:07 AM
#3
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
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Ha... well there you go.  Biggrin

Our school system celebrated it starting in 1983 I think. It replaced Columbus Day as a school holiday.

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 03-07-2022, 01:54 PM
#4
  • Bax
  • Active Member
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It REPLACED Columbus Day?  Interesting.  
I wonder if that made Italian-Americans angry?
With all these hyphenated days and recognitions, I'm feeling left out.
Personally, I'm a Shaving-American, and I want *MY* day, too!
I hereby declare the first of next month as National Shaving-American Day!
  :-)
- Bax

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