08-06-2022, 04:41 PM
#1
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Tempted to try a straight razor. Any recommendations? What’s the minimum investment?

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 08-06-2022, 05:20 PM
#2
  • Bax
  • Senior Member
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Short version:. Under $5 for a crappy straight razor on Amazon.  $55 for an awesome Focus R-28 shavette that's so awesome that if it could cook I'd marry it!  Learn how to use the shavette before moving up to a cutthroat razor.

Long version:  I went through this same issue a couple of weeks ago!  Search old forum posts in this and other online forums. I think you'll find a lot of good info and basic recommendations.  

When i did that, my takeaway was that you can get a shave ready, used vintage razor from one of the forum regulars for around 50 or 60 bucks, but a new razor of decent quality is going to cost you a lot more.

You could buy a low-end (affordable) new razor (even my local truck stop out on the highway has Union SR2's on the shelf for $12.99, but it's more of a novelty than a shave-ready razor according to all I've heard).  After you have someone put an edge on it and hone it for you, but by then you've spent more than you would have spent for a shave-ready vintage razor.  The steel in low-end razors ain't what it used to be, so there's a fair chance you'll end up with a cheap razor that won't hold an edge as long as it should, or will take too much work to keep it in a usable condition.

I went around and around on this for myself, and ended up buying a Focus R-28 shavette razor made in Italy. I forget what I paid, but it was pretty inexpensive.  I think it came from thesuperiorshave.com; it's available lots of places.  Lots of advice to try straight razor shaving with a shavette first, to see if you like it, before you break the bank on Old Timey straight razor and all the associated equipment (sharpening stones, stops, and whatnot).  I wanted to learn how to shave with one, rather than learn how to hone, strop, and maintain an old timey blade.  

The Focus R-28 shavette is pretty cool, because I can just snap a regular DE blade in half, plunk it in the razor, and I'm good to go! No sharpening, honing, or stropping required!   And there are lots of DE blade choices out there.  Other shavettes use specific blades (some proprietary) so make sure you know what you're getting before clicking on "buy now."

Since I've done 10 whole shaves with my straight razor shavette, I'm now a self-proclaimed expert!  Tomorrow will be shave number 11 with the Focus R-28, and so far it's been fun!  There are tons of experts on this forum (and others); after surfing a little while, you'll recognize who the experts are.  (I'm not among them.)

Good luck!
  :-)
- Bax

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 09-05-2022, 03:36 AM
#3
  • Bax
  • Senior Member
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Bump.
I'm surprised nobody smarter than me responded to Ilnones forum inquiry!
  :-)
- Bax

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 12-12-2022, 08:05 PM
#4
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Honestly, I'd spend more money and buy quality the first time rather then having to do it later.  I'd recommend a Thiers-Issard.

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