10-23-2022, 11:26 PM
#1
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So, I've heard that you shouldn't shake your colognes and perfumes.

But how about aftershaves? They're different from fragrances and also supposed to nourish your face a little.
So, is shaking aftershave splashes needed to activate the ingredients? Or may it somehow affect the scent?
What are your opinions?

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 10-24-2022, 04:05 AM
#2
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Welcome to TSN.  We have an Introductions section where you can introduce yourself to our members.

I don't shake aftershaves.

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 10-24-2022, 04:30 AM
#3
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I always shake my aftershaves!

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 10-24-2022, 04:32 AM
#4
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No shaking here. Maybe someone could explain the purpose, other than to introduce air molecules into the juice.

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 10-24-2022, 04:37 AM
#5
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(10-24-2022, 04:05 AM)TheLegalRazor Wrote: Welcome to TSN.  We have an Introductions section where you can introduce yourself to our members.

I don't shake aftershaves.

Oh yes ofcourse, thank you so much!

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 10-24-2022, 04:38 AM
#6
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(10-24-2022, 04:32 AM)primotenore Wrote: No shaking here. Maybe someone could explain the purpose, other than to introduce air molecules into the juice.

Agreed!

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 10-24-2022, 04:59 AM
#7
  • Wolf
  • Senior Member
  • Valencia, Spain
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I never did it, I think it is not necessary.

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 10-24-2022, 05:33 AM
#8
  • NJDJ
  • Senior Member
  • California
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I shake everything, including colognes. I do it to distribute the ingredients evenly throughout the bottle. With some aftershaves it doesn't seem to matter because they're relatively uniform (ex. AquaVelva).  Others, however, seem to benefit from the distribution of ingredients because they contain things that tend to separate when they sit (ex. Noble Otter).  If you did not shake them I would think that you would get a different concentration of ingredients on every use.

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 10-24-2022, 07:53 AM
#9
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(10-24-2022, 05:33 AM)NJDJ Wrote: I shake everything, including colognes. I do it to distribute the ingredients evenly throughout the bottle. With some aftershaves it doesn't seem to matter because they're relatively uniform (ex. AquaVelva).  Others, however, seem to benefit from the distribution of ingredients because they contain things that tend to separate when they sit (ex. Noble Otter).  If you did not shake them I would think that you would get a different concentration of ingredients on every use.

This is exactly why I shake them. A&E, most of the barrister & Mann different splash base, Maol Grooming and Zingari Man to name a few. Some the aftershave toner too tend to separate if they are sitting for a long period of time. So instead, of trying to see if they started to separate or not, I shake them all.

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 10-24-2022, 08:03 AM
#10
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I would read this before shaking your expensive colognes...
https://styleuphq.com/should-you-shake-perfume-bottle/

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 10-24-2022, 08:19 AM
#11
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I don’t shake my perfume. I’ve read the article and there’s a passage saying…

“ That said, sometimes, you may notice that the ingredients in perfume have settled at the bottom of the bottle especially when the bottle hasn’t been used for a long time….

If that is the case, you can give the perfume bottle a gentle twirl a few times. This can help to make the mixture more homogenous. However, do not try to shake the bottle even in such a scenario.”

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 10-24-2022, 09:00 AM
#12
  • Beau
  • Senior Member
  • New York
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I shake when the directions say to shake, as they do on this bottle of Master Splash Creations Peppermint Latte aftershave:

[Image: O7xVVZ0.jpg]

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 10-24-2022, 03:44 PM
#13
  • chazt
  • Super Moderator
  • Queens, NY
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I have a bottle of Sir Arthur, the BullGoose collaboration with Gentleman’s Nod. This is part of the website copy For best results shake well before use.  A similar recommendation appears on my bottle of Shannon’s Aussie Ice splash.

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 10-24-2022, 04:44 PM
#14
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I always shake my splash. It was my understanding it mixed the ingredients and/or scent notes. It is almost a compulsion now. I can't not do it.

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 10-24-2022, 05:23 PM
#15
  • NJDJ
  • Senior Member
  • California
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(10-24-2022, 08:03 AM)primotenore Wrote: I would read this before shaking your expensive colognes...
https://styleuphq.com/should-you-shake-perfume-bottle/

I don't know, Primo.  "Shaking your cologne imparts kinetic energy"...I call BS.

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 10-25-2022, 01:11 AM
#16
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(10-24-2022, 05:23 PM)NJDJ Wrote:
(10-24-2022, 08:03 AM)primotenore Wrote: I would read this before shaking your expensive colognes...
https://styleuphq.com/should-you-shake-perfume-bottle/

I don't know, Primo.  "Shaking your cologne and parts kinetic energy"...I call BS.
Some people shake...some people "Bloom"...I am non-judgmental in either case.

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 10-25-2022, 02:02 AM
#17
  • Sully
  • Super Moderator
  • Cedar Park, Texas
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(10-24-2022, 05:23 PM)NJDJ Wrote:
(10-24-2022, 08:03 AM)primotenore Wrote: I would read this before shaking your expensive colognes...
https://styleuphq.com/should-you-shake-perfume-bottle/

I don't know, Primo.  "Shaking your cologne and parts kinetic energy"...I call BS.

As I was reading the article I was wondering how much shaking you would have to do to heat the cologne up enough to have a noticable change in temperature.  Is there a physicist in the house who can figure out the energy created from the agitation/friction and convert that into heat energy?

Assuming it's a bottle of cologne with a pump sprayer that is very close to a closed system wouldn't the scent compunds stay in bottle and get absorbed back in the the carrier base?

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 10-25-2022, 05:05 AM
#18
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I have posted a query on basenotes.net on this subject and will report my findings.

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 10-25-2022, 06:27 AM
#19
  • chazt
  • Super Moderator
  • Queens, NY
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(10-25-2022, 02:02 AM)Sully Wrote:
(10-24-2022, 05:23 PM)NJDJ Wrote:
(10-24-2022, 08:03 AM)primotenore Wrote: I would read this before shaking your expensive colognes...
https://styleuphq.com/should-you-shake-perfume-bottle/

I don't know, Primo.  "Shaking your cologne and parts kinetic energy"...I call BS.

As I was reading the article I was wondering how much shaking you would have to do to heat the cologne up enough to have a noticable change in temperature.  Is there a physicist in the house who can figure out the energy created from the agitation/friction and convert that into heat energy?

Assuming it's a bottle of cologne with a pump sprayer that is very close to a closed system wouldn't the scent compunds stay in bottle and get absorbed back in the the carrier base?

Yes, this crossed my mind also.

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 10-25-2022, 06:47 AM
#20
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(10-24-2022, 08:03 AM)primotenore Wrote: I would read this before shaking your expensive colognes...
https://styleuphq.com/should-you-shake-perfume-bottle/

(10-25-2022, 05:05 AM)primotenore Wrote: I have posted a query on basenotes.net on this subject and will report my findings.

Primo, thanks for sharing this interesting article.   I don't know how much weight to give to it.  The basic premise is that shaking results in kinetic energy at the molecular level, and that this kinetic energy generates heat.  The heat is alleged to be detrimental to the chemical balance of the fragrance.  

We don't know who the author is or his qualifications.  There are no citations to any sources backing up the author's statements.  I have no idea whether any of this has been the subject of legitimate scientific studies.

I'm curious as to what responses you get on basenotes.net.   I expect you'll get opinions, but I wonder what scientific data those opinions will be based on.

My own opinion, backed up by absolutely no scientific data, is that whatever heat may be generated is so infinitesimally small that it has no effect on the fragrance.  A fragrance in a typical home environment is regularly exposed to more minor temperature variations than would be created by molecules moving around from shaking.

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