10-11-2012, 02:34 AM
#1
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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I thought this was a good review/article that is published on the G.B. Kent & Sons website.

Copy and pasted for your review (JP).

Why wet shave? Primarily a wet shave results in a closer shave compared to that of an electric razor. However it is also the very ritual of wet shaving that people enjoy. The preparation, the scents and the strong link to the past that is associated with using high quality wet shaving products can turn what is often viewed as a chore into something of a pleasurable and rewarding ritual. Most men feel that their skin condition improves remarkably from the exfoliating nature of a wet shave and the moisturizing temperament of the products used. A first-rate close shave is all about preparation and the right tools for the job. By following these pointers you will experience your ultimate shave:

1. Shave after the shower or wrap a hot soaking wet face towel across the face for 30 seconds. The hot water loosens up the pores and softens the hair for a closer shave.

2. Run your Kent shaving brush under the hot tap until the head becomes heavy with water.
Next lightly shake out approximately two thirds of the water that the brush head has
retained - too much water will dilute shaving cream and if you are using shave soap it will
hamper your efforts at building up a nice thick lather.

3. The definitive way to whip up a thick lather and protect the life of your shaving brush is to flick your brush back and forth across the soap bowl. Do not be tempted to only go around in circles!! Bristle is very fine, badger bristle even more so, and if you were to whip up a lather by going round and round in circles everyday, week after week and month after month the individual strands of bristle will get wound tighter and tighter. Eventually this would cause them to snap and fall out. So if you are to take away one crucial piece of advice on prolonging the life of a shaving brush it would be this - whip up a lather by flicking the brush head up and down or side to side and occasionally in circles but NEVER solely in circles! I guarantee this will aid the life of your brush.

4. If you are using shave cream dip the tip of the brush lightly into the tub and lather up
directly onto your skin in an upward motion.

5. Shave with the grain of your beard or stubble - generally this is in a downward direction. As long as your razor blade is changed regularly (we suggest once a week) you can simply glide the razor across your skin using minimal pressure.

6. For an extra close shave or any stubborn hair, reapply your lather or cream and shave
sideways across the skin in short strokes. Under the jaw line you may like to shave against
the grain and draw the razor upwards, again applying minimal pressure. Use your fingers to
feel for any obstinate areas of growth - hair grows in different directions around the neck
area.

7. Rinse your face with clean warm water to close the pores, and pat the skin dry and apply a suitable moisturizer.

8. Finally, rinse your brush under the tap, shake off excess water, and to prolong the life of the brush, turn upside down on the stand to prevent water settling in the base.

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 10-11-2012, 02:43 AM
#2
  • Johan
  • Barberian of the lathering
  • Sweden
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Thanks for posting. Maybe i´m lathering up the wrong way when, didnt know that circular movements damage the brush.

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 10-11-2012, 03:14 AM
#3
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Hmm, I've always face or bowl lathered using mostly a circular motion and my brushes have never been the worse for wear.

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 10-11-2012, 08:50 AM
#4
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Thanks for the post, Johnny.
Well, i guess it is time to conduct an experiment with my brushes. i am going to see how long mine last by maintaining my circular patterns when loading soap and face-lathering. It should be a good learning experience to pass onto my son if any thing happens.

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 10-11-2012, 08:54 AM
#5
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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You know, after reading that article and considering how soft/floppy Kent brushes are, they might works best with a back and forth motion like they describe. I had a BK8 and BK12 that had a hard time loading MWF for me using the circular motion.

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 10-11-2012, 09:10 AM
#6
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No continuous circular motion? Perhaps Kent brushes are just persnickity.

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 10-11-2012, 09:22 AM
#7
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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(10-11-2012, 09:10 AM)churchilllafemme Wrote: No continuous circular motion? Perhaps Kent brushes are just persnickity.

Persnickety, I like that.

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 10-11-2012, 10:59 AM
#8
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(10-11-2012, 08:54 AM)Johnny Wrote: You know, after reading that article and considering how soft/floppy Kent brushes are, they might works best with a back and forth motion like they describe. I had a BK8 and BK12 that had a hard time loading MWF for me using the circular motion.

This.

If you use a circular motion with a Kent, you have to really work hard to get anything really built up. That said, the circular motion gets the lather worked up, and the painting strokes build the lather up.

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 10-11-2012, 02:28 PM
#9
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(10-11-2012, 02:43 AM)Johan Wrote: Thanks for posting. Maybe i´m lathering up the wrong way when, didnt know that circular movements damage the brush.

No Johan, it only means it damages a Kent brush. Anyone lathering in a circular motion needs to not buy a Kent brush until they either make a proper brush or put into print what they actually mean to write. I doubt Kent can tell folks using Rooney or Simpson how to use those brushes. If Kent brushes can only be used in painterly strokes, and you use a circular motion don't buy them.

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 10-12-2012, 01:17 PM
#10
  • Johan
  • Barberian of the lathering
  • Sweden
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(10-11-2012, 02:28 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote:
(10-11-2012, 02:43 AM)Johan Wrote: Thanks for posting. Maybe i´m lathering up the wrong way when, didnt know that circular movements damage the brush.

No Johan, it only means it damages a Kent brush. Anyone lathering in a circular motion needs to not buy a Kent brush until they either make a proper brush or put into print what they actually mean to write. I doubt Kent can tell folks using Rooney or Simpson how to use those brushes. If Kent brushes can only be used in painterly strokes, and you use a circular motion don't buy them.

No risk that i buy a Kent! Just made a search and they are up with all those fancy stainless steel razors in price as it seems. I´m very happy with my incredible low priced turkish horsebrush (or as some say boarhair). Dont really care because its incredible value and comfort. Always easy to build up lather to.

And thinking about it i have never had any problemn with my brush losing hair yet (well not more than thats normal atleast i think), and i have used it for a year now. Always with circular movement in the mug/bowl and on the face and a second with painting motions.

Its actually the biggest problem with it. I bought 4 more few months as reserve, and the damn thing just keeps going and going. So i will have to wait 1 more year atleast before i can start using a new brush, as it seems. Angry Wink

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 10-12-2012, 01:25 PM
#11
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:-)

OK, I posted that tongue in cheek, sort of, to wise Kent up if they read the shaving forums.

I think the folks at Kent just don't have the spheroids required to explain to folks not to use the base of the brush for lathering. Now how hard is it to explain that? I did it in one sentence.

So they skirt the issue by saying "painting strokes". Well, why not grab the bull by the horns and just educate folks!?

BTW, if I'm not mistaken Rooney makes Kent brushes. I never had a problem with any of my badger brushes and circular strokes.

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 10-12-2012, 11:58 PM
#12
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I use my Kent my way . . . it is after all mine.

Regards,
Squire

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 10-13-2012, 12:09 AM
#13
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I can assure you with absolute certainty that Rooney does not make Kent brushes. And unless Rooney does business by a different name, it's not the same factory either.

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 10-13-2012, 08:17 AM
#14
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I've always split my circular brush motion 50/50 between clockwise and counter clockwise,
seemed logical.

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 10-13-2012, 08:27 AM
#15
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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(10-13-2012, 08:17 AM)razorx Wrote: I've always split my circular brush motion 50/50 between clockwise and counter clockwise,
seemed logical.

Don't you know, you are not allowed to use logic.Smile

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 10-13-2012, 08:47 AM
#16
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I stand corrected Lee.

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 10-13-2012, 09:18 AM
#17
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(10-13-2012, 08:27 AM)Johnny Wrote:
(10-13-2012, 08:17 AM)razorx Wrote: I've always split my circular brush motion 50/50 between clockwise and counter clockwise,
seemed logical.

Don't you know, you are not allowed to use logic.Smile

Ha! That's right !
The decision to shave in the traditional way is one of the most logical choices one could make.It is when we are confronted with the the vast array of modern and vintage shaving implements that demons possess us and wring the last vestige of logic from our very core.Biggrin

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 10-13-2012, 09:59 AM
#18
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(10-13-2012, 09:18 AM)razorx Wrote:
(10-13-2012, 08:27 AM)Johnny Wrote:
(10-13-2012, 08:17 AM)razorx Wrote: I've always split my circular brush motion 50/50 between clockwise and counter clockwise,
seemed logical.

Don't you know, you are not allowed to use logic.Smile

Ha! That's right !
The decision to shave in the traditional way is one of the most logical choices one could make.It is when we are confronted with the the vast array of modern and vintage shaving implements that demons possess us and wring the last vestige of logic from our very core.Biggrin

I don't like your logic...Dodgy


BiggrinBiggrinBiggrin

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