10-13-2012, 03:03 AM
#1
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I am looking for a new brush and was interested in the wee scott.

I have an Edwin Jagger Brush I like it but its a bit soft.

Thanks

Kurt

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 10-13-2012, 06:31 AM
#2
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New Forest brushes are excellent all-rounders, very well priced too.... this could be a good place for you to start.

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 10-13-2012, 06:33 AM
#3
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A price range would be helpful as well as what you are looking for in a brush so that we may help you to zone in on your next brush.

Welcome to the Nook!

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 10-13-2012, 07:06 AM
#4
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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The Wee Scot is a cute, neat, well made little brush. But unless you are a seasoned brush user, I do not recommend the Wee Scot as your first or second brush. If you are interested in Simpsons, I would look at either the Classic 1 or Duke 2 in best badger.

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 10-13-2012, 07:39 AM
#5
  • J_fro
  • Senior Member
  • From the 716!
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I will echo the Duke 2, and add in a Berkeley and Colonel

Those three are my core Simpson's stable. All in best.

I also really recommend Semogue's of any grade. (I have all but the grade in model 2000)

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 10-13-2012, 07:46 AM
#6
  • beartrap
  • Resident Цирюльник
  • Southern California
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Also, it would help to know size preference.

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 10-13-2012, 08:07 AM
#7
  • Arcadies
  • Senior Member
  • Greeneville, TN
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(10-13-2012, 07:39 AM)J_fro Wrote: I will echo the Duke 2, and add in a Berkeley and Colonel

Those three are my core Simpson's stable. All in best.

I also really recommend Semogue's of any grade. (I have all but the grade in model 2000)

I'll second the Colonel, the knot size/loft and handle length make it a perfect middle ground brush, it's long enough to bowl lather without banging your knuckles and it's small enough to comfortably face lather.

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 10-13-2012, 09:28 AM
#8
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Kurtis, we need more info or all we can do is tell you what we like, not necessarily what will work for you.

But I second the idea that a WeeScot might not be a really good choice yet.

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 10-13-2012, 09:52 AM
#9
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The Wee Scot is tiny. You literally hold it in your fingertips.

Sounds like you want a 2 band or a shorter lofted brush.

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 10-13-2012, 10:23 AM
#10
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For face lathering these brushes to either side of the WeeScot (the smallest brush in the lineup) are what I would call "normal" size. At least for me. The 2 largest are pretty much the largest I'd ever want to use for face lathering. A bowl latherer can use significantly larger brushes, of which I have none. The larger brushes pictured here can be used for bowl lathering with success.

From left to right: Simpson Chubby1 Best, Rooney 3/1 SuperSilvertip, WeeScot, Simpson Special Best, Simpson Commodore x1, Simpson Special Pure,

[Image: DSC03754.jpg]

To give some more scale to the WeeScot, here it is next to the next smallest brush in the lineup (directly to the right in the lineup. It underscores what Lee said about it...it's tiny. Note the size of the base of the knot and handle compared to my fingers. I have small hands.

[Image: DSC03755.jpg]

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 10-13-2012, 10:26 AM
#11
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Without knowing what type you are looking for, or what price range it is difficult to make a suggestion.

However, here's mine anyway. Since you already have a EJ Badger, I would suggest a simple Semogue 1305. A great boar bristle brush, and once broken in (a dozen or so shaves) it is the softest boar I have used. Great for creams or soaps, and it most certainly will not break the bank at ~$20.

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 10-13-2012, 10:37 AM
#12
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(10-13-2012, 10:23 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote: For face lathering these brushes to either side of the WeeScot (the smallest brush in the lineup) are what I would call "normal" size. At least for me. The 2 largest are pretty much the largest I'd ever want to use for face lathering. A bowl latherer can use significantly larger brushes, of which I have none. The larger brushes pictured here can be used for bowl lathering with success.

No, no, this is a large brush.

[Image: P1250549.JPG?m=1348769950]
[Image: P1250554.JPG?m=1348769626]


BiggrinBiggrinBiggrinBiggrin

On a more serious note, Shadows Dad gives good advice. I disagree with his upper limit though. I've used 28mm knots to good effect face lathering. Sure, it's like shaving with a whole badger, but it is surely luxurious. You have to do it at least once. 30mm+ probably not a good idea unless you have a very large face or are shaving your head/body.

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 10-13-2012, 11:51 AM
#13
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(10-13-2012, 09:28 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Kurtis, we need more info or all we can do is tell you what we like, not necessarily what will work for you.

But I second the idea that a WeeScot might not be a really good choice yet.

+1

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 10-13-2012, 11:59 AM
#14
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Lee, that's a crew served brush! Biggrin Incredible! Did you take out a mortgage on that monster!?

I've been giving this more thought.

Kurtis, you didn't say you were looking for a badger, we just assumed it. Would a boar brush work for you? Or maybe horse? I can suggest horse which is sort of between a badger and boar, but I have NO experience with them. You just got most everything I know about them.

Once a boar is broken in, and you need to do that - you can't buy a broken in boar unless it's from the B/T forum, they have great backbone yet the tips are soft. It isn't instant gratification, it can take up to a month of lathering it every day to break one in. The good news is though, you don't need to face lather it for shaving. You can break a boar brush in by hand lathering it every day and it'll break in just fine. I also recently read where a gent broke his new boar in my "lathering" it against a rubber sheet for some time while watching TV. I much prefer to break them in during the winter when our air is bone dry, by lathering it 3x a day. Yes, they should dry between lathers.

So we need more info my friend.

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 10-13-2012, 12:14 PM
#15
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I will echo the Duke 2 or 3.
[Image: simpson_case_best__78688_zoom_zps2112dd6a.jpg]

Simpsons Case Best Badger + Travel Tube = Ready to Go.
Height: 85 mm
Loft: 42 mm
Knot: 19 mm

Regards,
Eelco

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 10-13-2012, 01:10 PM
#16
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(10-13-2012, 11:59 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Lee, that's a crew served brush! Biggrin Incredible! Did you take out a mortgage on that monster!?

Maybe.... Shy

Quote:Kurtis, you didn't say you were looking for a badger, we just assumed it. Would a boar brush work for you? Or maybe horse? I can suggest horse which is sort of between a badger and boar, but I have NO experience with them. You just got most everything I know about them.

Once a boar is broken in, and you need to do that - you can't buy a broken in boar unless it's from the B/T forum, they have great backbone yet the tips are soft. It isn't instant gratification, it can take up to a month of lathering it every day to break one in. The good news is though, you don't need to face lather it for shaving. You can break a boar brush in by hand lathering it every day and it'll break in just fine. I also recently read where a gent broke his new boar in my "lathering" it against a rubber sheet for some time while watching TV. I much prefer to break them in during the winter when our air is bone dry, by lathering it 3x a day. Yes, they should dry between lathers.

Gah, I too made the assumption.

I'm 100% behind Shadows Dad on this recommendation. The difference isn't really great enough to warrant a big uptick in price when you just start out.

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 10-14-2012, 06:40 PM
#17
  • Shanman
  • Reserve Collection Squirrel Hair
  • NE Florida
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(10-13-2012, 12:14 PM)Eelco Amsterdam Wrote: I will echo the Duke 2 or 3.
[Image: simpson_case_best__78688_zoom_zps2112dd6a.jpg]

Simpsons Case Best Badger + Travel Tube = Ready to Go.
Height: 85 mm
Loft: 42 mm
Knot: 19 mm

Regards,
Eelco

Wow, definite Somerset rod stock in that one!

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 10-14-2012, 07:06 PM
#18
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If the Wee Scot intrigues you then go for it. They are not super expensive. They work better than their size suggests and you will eventually get one out of curiosity if shaving stays a hobby.

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 10-14-2012, 11:43 PM
#19
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(10-13-2012, 11:59 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Once a boar is broken in, and you need to do that - you can't buy a broken in boar unless it's from the B/T forum, they have great backbone yet the tips are soft. It isn't instant gratification, it can take up to a month of lathering it every day to break one in. The good news is though, you don't need to face lather it for shaving. You can break a boar brush in by hand lathering it every day and it'll break in just fine. I also recently read where a gent broke his new boar in my "lathering" it against a rubber sheet for some time while watching TV. I much prefer to break them in during the winter when our air is bone dry, by lathering it 3x a day. Yes, they should dry between lathers.

I have to agree with this. I am a bit of a badger snob, but one of my favorite brushes of all was brought to my attention by Johnny. The boar Semogue 1305 is one of my favorites. Once fully broken in it works great for soaps AND creams. I recently sent a PM to Johnny as I decided to give my Muhle R41 one last try before I decided whether to sell it or not. I used a cream I always have success with and while trying to figure out which badger to use I surprised myself and grabbed the 1305. IMO there is no better inexpensive brush. If I could only own one brush for the rest of my life, this is one I would seriously have to consider as the one to pick. And it's only $20.

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 10-15-2012, 09:23 AM
#20
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(10-13-2012, 10:37 AM)asharperrazor Wrote:
(10-13-2012, 10:23 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote: For face lathering these brushes to either side of the WeeScot (the smallest brush in the lineup) are what I would call "normal" size. At least for me. The 2 largest are pretty much the largest I'd ever want to use for face lathering. A bowl latherer can use significantly larger brushes, of which I have none. The larger brushes pictured here can be used for bowl lathering with success.

No, no, this is a large brush.

[Image: P1250549.JPG?m=1348769950]
[Image: P1250554.JPG?m=1348769626]


BiggrinBiggrinBiggrinBiggrin

On a more serious note, Shadows Dad gives good advice. I disagree with his upper limit though. I've used 28mm knots to good effect face lathering. Sure, it's like shaving with a whole badger, but it is surely luxurious. You have to do it at least once. 30mm+ probably not a good idea unless you have a very large face or are shaving your head/body.

Do you happen to have a comparison pic of this and the Wee Scot - just for show Wink

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