10-14-2012, 11:24 AM
#1
  • savagejoerude
  • If you ain't a LOSER, you ain't livin'!!
  • New Orleans USA
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Hey everybody.. Well I'm into my 3rd week using a DE. I've learned so much from all you vets here and I do appreciate everything I've learned. I've learned about equipment and how to care for it. Soaps, creams and making lather. Brushes, Blades, techniques. I even have the A/D pretty bad too.... The biggest I learned today and it struck me on my 1st pass. The importance of blade angle. I'm sure everyone here knows it but to a noob it has to hit you. We have been conditioned for years while shaving with the modern "toy" razors that the head pivots with the contours of the face. We have learned to not have to change the angle of the handle... Well SMACK!! I'm sure while us noobs are bumbling around our faces with very sharp instruments we get it. But we have to go back and do a lot of re-pass, touch-ups. Just a simple notion of being aware of the blade angle while making your pass seems to be a key factor in DE shaving and it should be stressed to noobs more often.... I've been giving myself some pretty good shaves but I was having to go back over some spots more than I'd like too. After I became aware of this fact I think todays shave was the most enjoyable yet. I made sure I kept a nice angle on my 2nd and 3rd passes. A didn't have to do very much touch-up and I used less pressure than ever. (I was using a new Feather blade in my Parker and was being extra careful. The last Feather I used in the Fatboy cut me up a bit. Those darn Feather's are still pretty sharp and I did have a couple weepers). But all in all it was a great shave. It is amazing how much a simple little thing like this revelation of keeping the correct angle across the different contours of your face can make all the difference in the world... So thanks vets for giving us a good start and to the other fellows in my newbee class, while you're making a pass, think about the angle and moving your handle with the contours of your face. You'll get the better shave for it....
Great shaving friends. Have a nice day!!!

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 10-14-2012, 11:29 AM
#2
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That's great, Joe, you're becoming a vet. Now you'll be able to add your experience and expertise for even newer members. Good job.

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 10-14-2012, 11:31 AM
#3
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Joe,
Congratulations and what a great insight! Continued success.

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 10-14-2012, 12:05 PM
#4
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Pleased to hear your report Joe, very encouraging. It really is the difference between you doing the work or the razor thinking for you. Like a stick shift compared to an automatic, so to speak.

Another thought occurs . . . Feather blades are the sharpest (that's why they're my favorite) but that does not automatically mean they may be too sharp for some shavers. When confronted by a heavy razor such as the Fatboy those who come from a background of light plastic razors instinctively want to grip it harder, which is a mistake.

When you grip the handle hard your fingers and wrist become rigid which in effect makes an extension of the razor handle all the way down to your elbow. This creates a fulcrum effect that brings your forearm muscles to bear transferring all that weight and strength directly to the blade edge touching your face.

So with a light grip and/or flexing wrist even the Feather can be tamed.

Regards,
Squire

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 10-14-2012, 03:58 PM
#5
  • savagejoerude
  • If you ain't a LOSER, you ain't livin'!!
  • New Orleans USA
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(10-14-2012, 12:05 PM)squire Wrote: Pleased to hear your report Joe, very encouraging. It really is the difference between you doing the work or the razor thinking for you. Like a stick shift compared to an automatic, so to speak.

Another thought occurs . . . Feather blades are the sharpest (that's why they're my favorite) but that does not automatically mean they may be too sharp for some shavers. When confronted by a heavy razor such as the Fatboy those who come from a background of light plastic razors instinctively want to grip it harder, which is a mistake.

When you grip the handle hard your fingers and wrist become rigid which in effect makes an extension of the razor handle all the way down to your elbow. This creates a fulcrum effect that brings your forearm muscles to bear transferring all that weight and strength directly to the blade edge touching your face.

So with a light grip and/or flexing wrist even the Feather can be tamed.

Regards,
Squire
Thanks squire. I know the Feathers are sharp. I ain't a'skeared of em though. You are probably right about the weight of the Fatboy. I used the Parker96R and it is much lighter. I will apply your suggestion about light touch..I have a nice assortment of some different blades coming from Phil this week. I've tried Shark SC's and Wilkerson Classics along with the Feathers. So far I like the Wilkies best closely followed by the Sharks. The "Savage" collection I ordered are Astra SP, Lord Platinum, Red Personnas, Gillette Thins and Gillette Dark Blues. After combing the threads on here and the "2B" site, those are the blades that seem to get the most positive reviews. I'll post my Newbee reviews on these blades as well... I also have a nice 54 Super Speed coming. From what I've read these are mild razors...So I am off and running... Like a young jockey on a fast horse!!! The only way to learn is to get up on it and ride that sucka'...Giddy Up ya NAG!!!!...lol

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 10-14-2012, 07:57 PM
#6
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
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I am glad to hear that your shaves are improving Joe. There is a learning curve and probably some unlearning to do as Squire suggests. You will soon be the one giving tips to new wet shavers. Cool

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 10-16-2012, 07:25 PM
#7
  • Notary
  • Member
  • Montreal, Quebec
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Welcome aboard and you are on your way to becoming a veteran. After repeated practice, the muscles in our bodies memorize the movements and all the variables that affect shaving become second nature. But as you have well discovered there is no better teacher than our own trial and error, that we call experience, to guide us in our quest for the perfect shave. Happy Shaving. Sam.

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 10-17-2012, 04:02 PM
#8
  • Grumpy
  • Senior Member
  • DisneyLand
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Thanks for your post.

Sometimes even us Vets think we know it all and occasionally take our DEs for granted and are then reminded why they are called Safety Razors.

Yep, there is a learning curve and one day I will make it over the top.

Have Fun Shavng.

Grumpy

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 10-24-2012, 09:07 PM
#9
  • OldDog23
  • Senior Member
  • BeanTown MetroWest
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(10-14-2012, 03:58 PM)savagejoerude Wrote:
(10-14-2012, 12:05 PM)squire Wrote: Pleased to hear your report Joe, very encouraging. It really is the difference between you doing the work or the razor thinking for you. Like a stick shift compared to an automatic, so to speak.

Another thought occurs . . . Feather blades are the sharpest (that's why they're my favorite) but that does not automatically mean they may be too sharp for some shavers. When confronted by a heavy razor such as the Fatboy those who come from a background of light plastic razors instinctively want to grip it harder, which is a mistake.

When you grip the handle hard your fingers and wrist become rigid which in effect makes an extension of the razor handle all the way down to your elbow. This creates a fulcrum effect that brings your forearm muscles to bear transferring all that weight and strength directly to the blade edge touching your face.

So with a light grip and/or flexing wrist even the Feather can be tamed.

Regards,
Squire
Thanks squire. I know the Feathers are sharp. I ain't a'skeared of em though. You are probably right about the weight of the Fatboy. I used the Parker96R and it is much lighter. I will apply your suggestion about light touch..I have a nice assortment of some different blades coming from Phil this week. I've tried Shark SC's and Wilkerson Classics along with the Feathers. So far I like the Wilkies best closely followed by the Sharks. The "Savage" collection I ordered are Astra SP, Lord Platinum, Red Personnas, Gillette Thins and Gillette Dark Blues. After combing the threads on here and the "2B" site, those are the blades that seem to get the most positive reviews. I'll post my Newbee reviews on these blades as well... I also have a nice 54 Super Speed coming. From what I've read these are mild razors...So I am off and running... Like a young jockey on a fast horse!!! The only way to learn is to get up on it and ride that sucka'...Giddy Up ya NAG!!!!...lol
Hi S-Joe...Feathers ARE sharp, that's why they shave so well and with low effort. In a more agressive razor, they can chew you up a bit. I'll be looking to see how you made out using them in a milder razor. I use them in an adjustable Gillette on a low setting and a Feather AS-D1 (a mild razor) and fare pretty well. And with a bulldog handle added, the Feather is a fairly hefty piece. (It takes time for the skin to adjust to ANYTHING you change in your routine.) Everything else seems dull to me after I got used to them and I like to shave VERY CLOSE. It just took me a bit to sort out a setting number and I still don't really care for them in my EJ DE8X, but it's because for me, I find that particular razor a bit much for my ultra-sensitive skin. ANY blade in that razor for me feels somewhat harsh. So I only use it for first-pass brush-hogging off the heavier scruff when I have gone outside of my 24 hour shaving window, and then use a milder razor for getting totally stubble-free. If I stay on schedule, I can just use the one mild razor. Good luck, Chin up !

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 10-25-2012, 02:48 AM
#10
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Joe, congratulations on taking your shaving to a new level.

Over time you'll incorporate what you're learning into muscle memory, but until this keep focusing on the basics and good stuff.

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 10-25-2012, 03:20 AM
#11
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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Joe, a most enjoyable read. I taught my sons the same way my Dad taught me over 50 years ago, angle and pressure, use very little of both.

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