10-21-2012, 07:46 AM
#1
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
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Some of the vintage Gillette razors, such as the Single Ring, are plated in silver. The problem with silver plating is that in time, it will become tarnished. While you can use a polish such as Maas to remove the tarnish, a polish will remove some of the silver plating in the process. There is a much better way to remove the tarnish that will not harm the razor and is easier to boot.

Rick (AKA Going Postal) posted a tutorial on how to reverse the chemical reaction that leads to tarnish a few years ago. I decided to try his method for myself on a Gillette Norfolk that I had re-plated in Silver at the Razor Emporium that had become tarnished. His process worked like a charm and I thought it warrants being passed along to the Shave Nook community.

All you need is baking soda, a piece of aluminum foil, a shallow baking dish and some boiling water. Line the baking dish with aluminum foil ( shiny side up), place the razor (s) in the dish and sprinkle baking soda on top. Make sure to put the dish in the sink just in case you overflow the dish. Pour boiling water over the razor(s) and let them steep for approximately 30 minutes. Give the razors a bath and then buff with a soft cotton cloth.

For those curious as to how this process works, tarnish forms when the silver combines with sulfur to make silver sulfide. The chemical reaction created by Rick’s method turns the silver sulfide back to silver without removing any of the silver plate. Aluminum foil is used because the sulfur atoms are more attracted to aluminum than silver, and the sulfur atoms will turn into aluminum sulfide and adhere to the foil.

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 10-21-2012, 07:51 AM
#2
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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That sound like a very interesting process. Though I do not have a silver razor, I do have other small silver objects that I will do this to. Thanks for the info.

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 10-21-2012, 08:01 AM
#3
  • slantman
  • Expert Shaver
  • Leesburg, Florida
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Thank you Phil for a great tip. Must try that on some silver items I have.

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 10-21-2012, 08:39 AM
#4
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Holy chemistry Phil!

That is some great info!

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 10-21-2012, 08:46 AM
#5
  • Tonality
  • Attempted Soap Sabbatical
  • Boston
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I have tried this a couple times with my Bell Tube Aristocrat and a Single Ring and both times it worked out spectacularly. Such an easy process to make your razors look like new, plus... SCIENCE!

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 10-21-2012, 08:59 AM
#6
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
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Maybe we should have Teiste or another member with photography (or video) skills document the process. It really is visually stunning.

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 10-21-2012, 10:24 AM
#7
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Thanks for the reminder Phil!

I agree it works great. It won't hurt to let the razor stay in for much longer if the tarnish is exceptionally heavy.

There may be no need to get anyone to document anything... I seem to remember a thread about it in the archives in this section. What I don't remember if it links to another site.

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 10-21-2012, 11:25 AM
#8
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Phil, thanks and i think Gary (GDCarrington) had posted a link on this very same method, with pictures.
Here you go, parts 1, 2, and 3:
* http://shavenook.com/thread-the-science-...ing-part-1
* http://shavenook.com/thread-the-science-...ing-part-2
* http://shavenook.com/thread-the-science-...ing-part-3

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 10-21-2012, 11:44 AM
#9
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
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(10-21-2012, 11:25 AM)celestino Wrote: Phil, thanks and i think Gary (GDCarrington) had posted a link on this very same method, with pictures.
Here you go, parts 1, 2, and 3:
* http://shavenook.com/thread-the-science-...ing-part-1
* http://shavenook.com/thread-the-science-...ing-part-2
* http://shavenook.com/thread-the-science-...ing-part-3

Well, I'll be. Biggrin I must have been on a field trip that day. I had seen the method posted on another forum a few years ago but did not realize it has been posted here.

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 10-21-2012, 05:52 PM
#10
  • savagejoerude
  • If you ain't a LOSER, you ain't livin'!!
  • New Orleans USA
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That sounds like what we call VOUX DOUX around here....lol

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 10-24-2012, 08:19 AM
#11
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(10-21-2012, 07:46 AM)bullgoose Wrote: Some of the vintage Gillette razors, such as the Single Ring, are plated in silver. The problem with silver plating is that in time, it will become tarnished. While you can use a polish such as Maas to remove the tarnish, a polish will remove some of the silver plating in the process. There is a much better way to remove the tarnish that will not harm the razor and is easier to boot.

Rick (AKA Going Postal) posted a tutorial on how to reverse the chemical reaction that leads to tarnish a few years ago. I decided to try his method for myself on a Gillette Norfolk that I had re-plated in Silver at the Razor Emporium that had become tarnished. His process worked like a charm and I thought it warrants being passed along to the Shave Nook community.

All you need is baking soda, a piece of aluminum foil, a shallow baking dish and some boiling water. Line the baking dish with aluminum foil ( shiny side up), place the razor (s) in the dish and sprinkle baking soda on top. Make sure to put the dish in the sink just in case you overflow the dish. Pour boiling water over the razor(s) and let them steep for approximately 30 minutes. Give the razors a bath and then buff with a soft cotton cloth.

For those curious as to how this process works, tarnish forms when the silver combines with sulfur to make silver sulfide. The chemical reaction created by Rick’s method turns the silver sulfide back to silver without removing any of the silver plate. Aluminum foil is used because the sulfur atoms are more attracted to aluminum than silver, and the sulfur atoms will turn into aluminum sulfide and adhere to the foil.

Phil,

how could you POSSIBLY add a thread like this without before/after photos of the razor?!!?!?

Tongue

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 10-25-2012, 01:14 AM
#12
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(10-21-2012, 07:46 AM)bullgoose Wrote: Some of the vintage Gillette razors, such as the Single Ring, are plated in silver. The problem with silver plating is that in time, it will become tarnished. While you can use a polish such as Maas to remove the tarnish, a polish will remove some of the silver plating in the process. There is a much better way to remove the tarnish that will not harm the razor and is easier to boot.

Rick (AKA Going Postal) posted a tutorial on how to reverse the chemical reaction that leads to tarnish a few years ago. I decided to try his method for myself on a Gillette Norfolk that I had re-plated in Silver at the Razor Emporium that had become tarnished. His process worked like a charm and I thought it warrants being passed along to the Shave Nook community.

All you need is baking soda, a piece of aluminum foil, a shallow baking dish and some boiling water. Line the baking dish with aluminum foil ( shiny side up), place the razor (s) in the dish and sprinkle baking soda on top. Make sure to put the dish in the sink just in case you overflow the dish. Pour boiling water over the razor(s) and let them steep for approximately 30 minutes. Give the razors a bath and then buff with a soft cotton cloth.

For those curious as to how this process works, tarnish forms when the silver combines with sulfur to make silver sulfide. The chemical reaction created by Rick’s method turns the silver sulfide back to silver without removing any of the silver plate. Aluminum foil is used because the sulfur atoms are more attracted to aluminum than silver, and the sulfur atoms will turn into aluminum sulfide and adhere to the foil.

Phil, how much baking soda did you use?

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