10-23-2012, 08:41 PM
#1
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my friend found his great grandfather's straight razor in his grandmom's garage. I don't know anything about straight razors whatsoever. any help would be appreciated.

what's it worth? is it a good razor?

   

   

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 10-23-2012, 09:55 PM
#2
  • Tonality
  • Attempted Soap Sabbatical
  • Washington State
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While I am nowhere near qualified for any of this, I do know we will need some sort of name which should be on the tang, between the blade and the handle.

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 10-23-2012, 10:15 PM
#3
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My friend is saying it says this:

Eson
Shuredge
Rochester, NY

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 10-23-2012, 10:33 PM
#4
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Blade is useless, too much rust.

But the scales.... oh, the scales.....

Could be tortoise shell. Pretty good chance too. I rarely say that btw.

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 10-24-2012, 07:38 AM
#5
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You should try a little MAAS or Flitz or some other polish on the blade first and see if that rust may not be as deep as it seems from this photo. I had an old Torrey that looked badly rusted and with drips of paint (?) and it cleaned up really well and shaves well and lost no metal on the edge.

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 10-24-2012, 09:21 AM
#6
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Lindy's suggestion cannot hurt. Unless you want to preserve it like that. Some collectors do, I do not know why.

Shuredge is by the Robeson company. They were a manufacturer here in the States. They went out of business because of the cheap German imports.

They made fine razors.

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 10-24-2012, 12:46 PM
#7
  • oscar11
  • Senior Member
  • North Dakota
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I certainly wouldn't write the razor off as a loss by virtue of the pics. A little oil and 320 grit wet/dry sandpaper will tell the tale pretty quick though.

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 10-24-2012, 02:19 PM
#8
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(10-23-2012, 10:33 PM)asharperrazor Wrote: Blade is useless, too much rust.

But the scales.... oh, the scales.....

Could be tortoise shell. Pretty good chance too. I rarely say that btw.

I think I saw on some site that they're faux tortoise shell. I'll have to find a link tonight.

(10-24-2012, 07:38 AM)lindyhop66 Wrote: You should try a little MAAS or Flitz or some other polish on the blade first and see if that rust may not be as deep as it seems from this photo. I had an old Torrey that looked badly rusted and with drips of paint (?) and it cleaned up really well and shaves well and lost no metal on the edge.

I'll pass that info along to him.

(10-24-2012, 09:21 AM)asharperrazor Wrote: Lindy's suggestion cannot hurt. Unless you want to preserve it like that. Some collectors do, I do not know why.

Shuredge is by the Robeson company. They were a manufacturer here in the States. They went out of business because of the cheap German imports.

They made fine razors.

he's new to traditional shaving so I'm not sure of his motive as to whether or not he wants to try and use it if it's useable or just keep it because it was in his family.

(10-24-2012, 12:46 PM)oscar11 Wrote: I certainly wouldn't write the razor off as a loss by virtue of the pics. A little oil and 320 grit wet/dry sandpaper will tell the tale pretty quick though.

by a little oil, what oil do you recommend?

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 10-24-2012, 03:34 PM
#9
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Mineral oil is ideal. Ballistol works too. Anything that doesn't have additives that might corrode the steel.

Even just steel wool will remove the rust.

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 10-25-2012, 08:18 AM
#10
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I have several Robesons' that have that same distinctive shaft treatment.
As to the scales, not sure from this vantage point but they could be tortoise. Some sites, depending where it is, won't allow tortoise or ivory to be sold as such so they are at times listed as faux to get around the sale.
Whatever they are they will certainly clean up just fine.

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 10-26-2012, 01:49 PM
#11
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I'll be surprised if that's faux tort.

Certainly jealous to have no heir's blade to shave with or at least admire, & hoping I'll beat the lifespan curve just a bit and/or & have some early grandsons to see be bequeathed a few.

Go get some wet/dry papers and time and see what develops....Flitz and Maas r also both very good. If it ain't pitted below an emm emm or so u can put a new bevel under there.

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 12-29-2012, 12:00 AM
#12
  • Lee-
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The razor referenced in the thread is the one I found. If the razor were cleaned up, is it a good straight razor? I'm interested in trying straight razor shaving. Additionally, approximately what does cleaning something in that bad of shape cost? I don't have any idea what this sort of service costs.

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 12-29-2012, 08:58 AM
#13
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I would just get some wet/dry sandpaper, like starting with 80 or 120 and after you have the rust off, use higher and higher grades sandpaper to polish the scratches to a finer finish.

You can wrap small rectangles of sandpaper around a wine cork and just do circles and later back and forth along the spine and spare the edge. I just read on straightrazorplace about folding a sponge and wrapping the sanding paper around it to sand the curves better in a hollow razor.

Then you can get some polish, even Brasso, if you don't have MAAS or Flitz or Mother's Mag polish.

If there's rust around the pivot pin area of the shank, I spray a little WD-40 and move the scales around and wipe the excess off with Q-Tips. Furniture polish, Pledge, for example, will polish the scales.

The photos aren't very helpful because of the lighting, but the main thing is if there are chips on the edge, you need to send it to a honer who can restore blades. If there aren't chips on the edge, just send it out to be honed. Glen Mercurio of http://gemstarcustoms.com/ could do it for you and even give you a quote for doing a light restore and hone. You can contact him and send better lighted photos.

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 12-29-2012, 09:15 AM
#14
  • DLP
  • Active Member
  • Missouri
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You might try contacting Glen at GemStarCustoms.com. Glen does restorations and would be better able to assess the blade and handle.

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 12-29-2012, 05:06 PM
#15
  • geezer
  • Senior Member
  • Menomonie, Western WI
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I would not count that blade out at all. I would look for definite areas of spotty corrosion that align with certain colors of the handle/scales. That would mean they are celluloid and not the best thing to have. They would be of value to a collector though. Tooth paste and an old small cut off paintbrush or toothbrush gently applied ( Old scales break very easily) would be my first choice for a simple cheap cleanup to assess the total condition without spending a lot of money. Careful, shiny,sharp!
Have fun and Happy New Year!
~Richard

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 12-31-2012, 02:28 PM
#16
  • Lee-
  • Junior Member
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(12-29-2012, 08:58 AM)lindyhop66 Wrote: I would just get some wet/dry sandpaper, like starting with 80 or 120 and after you have the rust off, use higher and higher grades sandpaper to polish the scratches to a finer finish.

You can wrap small rectangles of sandpaper around a wine cork and just do circles and later back and forth along the spine and spare the edge. I just read on straightrazorplace about folding a sponge and wrapping the sanding paper around it to sand the curves better in a hollow razor.

Then you can get some polish, even Brasso, if you don't have MAAS or Flitz or Mother's Mag polish.

If there's rust around the pivot pin area of the shank, I spray a little WD-40 and move the scales around and wipe the excess off with Q-Tips. Furniture polish, Pledge, for example, will polish the scales.

The photos aren't very helpful because of the lighting, but the main thing is if there are chips on the edge, you need to send it to a honer who can restore blades. If there aren't chips on the edge, just send it out to be honed. Glen Mercurio of http://gemstarcustoms.com/ could do it for you and even give you a quote for doing a light restore and hone. You can contact him and send better lighted photos.

I can do additional photos, but it seems to me that the edge of the blade is damaged, so it will need more than just getting rid of the rust.

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 12-31-2012, 04:35 PM
#17
  • Grumpy
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  • DisneyLand
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Where is the edge damaged?

Need more pics.

It could be it has a nick and those can be worked out.

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 12-31-2012, 04:57 PM
#18
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I have a Shur Edge with a hammered tang like that, but a square point. It is a superb shaver, and judging by the photo, I have no reason to believe that that one would not be also.
A little elbow grease and edge work could pay huge dividends. Beyond the patina, which would not bother me in the least, the blade looks in quite good shape to me.

Good luck with her..

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 12-31-2012, 05:42 PM
#19
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So, do put more light on the blade when you re-shoot or photograph outside in the sun. Place white paper underneath. Because from we can see now is an okay edge. Even if it has little chips, it can be restored, ...if it's worth it to you.

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 12-31-2012, 09:12 PM
#20
  • Lee-
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Below is highest resolution I can do (assuming tinypic doesn't scale it down).

[Image: rkqv52.png]

EDIT: looks like tinypic scaled it down. Original is 2524x676. Tinypic is 1598x428.

In the above photo about 2/3rds to the right you can see a chip taken out of the blade and to the right of that a smaller chip. The blow image is just that one above cropped to hopefully stop tinypic from scaling it down.

[Image: 175un7.jpg]

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