10-24-2012, 12:49 PM
#1
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Question for you Castle Forbes fans out there.

Normally when I use a cream (not a croap but a true cream), I use my finger to take an almond size dollop out of the jar and load it onto the brush. CF is by far the densest cream I have ever used, it's softer than a soft soap, but it is almost a hard cream if there is such a thing.

I've never liked the idea of swirling my brush in a cream to load, but this almost seems like the only way to easily load a brush with CF. How do others load up?

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 10-24-2012, 01:02 PM
#2
  • beartrap
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  • Southern California
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Use a spatula or a baby spoon, smear it in your bowl/scuttle and load from there.

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 10-24-2012, 01:28 PM
#3
  • Teiste
  • Moderator Emeritus
  • Salt Lake City,UT
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CF is one of the few creams (with Tabula Rasa and Santa Maria La Novella) which I treat like a hard soap , so I load the brush straight from it with circular strokes.It works perfect and only two or three circular strokes are needed it to fully load the brush with the right amount of cream.For the rest , I use a plastic spatula (courtesy of Nordstrom).

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 10-24-2012, 01:37 PM
#4
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CF produces one of the finest lathers and I can consequently see why you wouldn't want to waste it.

That said, it is indeed a very dense cream, just a notch below being a soft soap.

I treat it as I do soap, swirling my brush atop the hard cream.

When I'm done, I leave the top off till the cream dries.

I've owned Castle Forbes' Lime SC for nearly a year, during which time I've used it generously. Very little is gone, so do not worry about comprising this heavy cream's consistency or causing it to melt prematurely.

(With Taylor's I also swirl on top of the cream. But with Trumper's & Truefitt, lighter in consistency, I dig into the pot for a dollop.

Hope this allays your worries. Enjoy CF. It's decidedly superior to the three Ts.

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 10-24-2012, 02:06 PM
#5
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Thanks guys, that helps a lot. Yes, I am already in love with CF, it is an incredible cream. My next go round with it I will just use it like a soft soap. Biggrin

Thanks again!

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 10-24-2012, 02:46 PM
#6
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I ended up loading it off the tub like I would a croap. It's a pretty hard cream.

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 10-24-2012, 11:40 PM
#7
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CF's only problem is one of its three scents is wretched. The Cedar-Sandal is a foul mess up - or maybe I sniffed an old or contaminated container...

The Lime SC contains the best lime scent I've experienced in wetshaving, and the Lavender the best lavender.

Performance: A+

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 10-24-2012, 11:50 PM
#8
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I prefer to use it just like a soap or a croap.
I swirl my brush in circular motion and lather on face or bowl.

CF lime has a great scent and is a great performer. I think it deserves the high price; you just can not finish it!

Actually, I don't use spatula or spoon for the cream tubs either, I just dab my brush lightly and check the amount; if it's enough proceed from there.

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 10-25-2012, 01:01 AM
#9
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(10-24-2012, 12:49 PM)wingdo Wrote: Question for you Castle Forbes fans out there.

Normally when I use a cream (not a croap but a true cream), I use my finger to take an almond size dollop out of the jar and load it onto the brush. CF is by far the densest cream I have ever used, it's softer than a soft soap, but it is almost a hard cream if there is such a thing.

I've never liked the idea of swirling my brush in a cream to load, but this almost seems like the only way to easily load a brush with CF. How do others load up?

Hello Doug, I have been a CF user for many years now. Love the stuff.

Like you it was a bit of trial & error, what I now have found is after a couple of minutes soak (brush) shake most of the water out, so the brush just feel's damp and lightly swirl the brush tips on top " you do not need a lot" to obtain a beautiful thick creamy lather using a scuttle.

Charles U.K

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