10-28-2012, 06:54 AM
#1
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Howdy do gentlemen I'm in need of fine grit sharing stones but I do t want to give the barn away for one... Any suggestions.

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 10-28-2012, 07:13 AM
#2
  • DoubleB
  • Active Member
  • Zeeland, The Netherlands
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Depends on what the purpose is for the stone. If you need a fine grit stone for a regular maintenance touch-up of your straight and you don't want to break the bank you might aswell look into a Chinese 12K stone (C12K) I don't know where you're living but I know they sell around 35 dollars in some kinds of large woodworking shop in the US. They can be found on internet aswell.

If you want something a bit more allround I would look into a Norton 4/8K or a Naniwa 3/8K combo. Yes they are a bit more expensive (70 - 90 bucks) but they will last you a lifetime.

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 10-28-2012, 07:14 AM
#3
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Thanks dude I'm in the Houston area by the way.

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 10-28-2012, 07:29 AM
#4
  • DoubleB
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  • Zeeland, The Netherlands
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(10-28-2012, 07:14 AM)StrattDaddy Wrote: Thanks dude I'm in the Houston area by the way.

Woodcraft sells the C12K.

http://www.woodcraft.com/stores/store.aspx?id=315

Again, what exactly are you planning to do with the stone? Maintain edge, finish edge or sharpen edge? The C12K is no good for sharpening a straight. Maintaining an edge and finishing an edge should be no problem.

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 10-28-2012, 11:12 AM
#5
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Naniwa 12k is a better buy IMO.

You can even use a spyderco ultra fine stone if you wanted.

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 10-28-2012, 11:34 AM
#6
  • DoubleB
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  • Zeeland, The Netherlands
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(10-28-2012, 11:12 AM)asharperrazor Wrote: Naniwa 12k is a better buy IMO.

Agreed, but it is over 100 dollars and StrattDaddy said he wanted a low cost hone.

That being said, there are indeed other alternatives. You could even get yourself some cheap sheets of lapping film.

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 10-28-2012, 12:54 PM
#7
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Well it needs to be sharpened then finnished. Thanks for the link btw

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 10-28-2012, 01:26 PM
#8
  • DoubleB
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  • Zeeland, The Netherlands
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(10-28-2012, 12:54 PM)StrattDaddy Wrote: Well it needs to be sharpened then finnished. Thanks for the link btw

Well if you need sharpening and finishing I would suggest a combo hone. Norton or Naniwa seems the way to go, but I think Lee or an other honemeister can give you more details on that since they have way more knowledge then I do.

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 10-28-2012, 01:52 PM
#9
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(10-28-2012, 01:26 PM)DoubleB Wrote:
(10-28-2012, 12:54 PM)StrattDaddy Wrote: Well it needs to be sharpened then finnished. Thanks for the link btw

Well if you need sharpening and finishing I would suggest a combo hone. Norton or Naniwa seems the way to go, but I think Lee or an other honemeister can give you more details on that since they have way more knowledge then I do.

If only one razor it'd be cheaper to send it out one time and buy a finishing stone for future touch ups. Alternatively, you can buy something like a 12k stone and spend several hours doing the work of a 4k & 8k stone. Add even more time if you need to do 1k stone work.

That said, IIRC a 4k/8k & 1k stone shouldn't set you back more than $100. I haven't priced stones in a long time so you'll have to confirm.

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 10-28-2012, 05:52 PM
#10
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Truth be told I have three straight razors now. An Zartina & Frost straight razors that I bought at an antique shop and an American pro 150 that I bought of of amazon. They are all quite dull & nowhere near shave ready. I also have an old saftey razor my father gave to me, I'd like to start learning to hone but I'm seriously considering sending one of my razors to a honemiester. Thanks again for the info.

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 10-28-2012, 06:06 PM
#11
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If those are your straight razors, you've got two straights that can be sharpened.

The one that looks like a pocket knife is probably just that, a pocket knife. You may be able to shave with it, but I would just send it back to you.

The American pro is basically just a Fromm or Giesen & Forstoff. Mediocre steel, but good enough.

The vintage one is probably going to be your best shaver. I'd recommend taking some metal polish to the blade and remove that rust/grime. You can do it yourself, you don't have to send it to a professional. The goal is to just get rid of the rust.

Either case, you'd need a 1k, 4k, & 8k stone to do a good job on them and not take forever. 4k/8k minimum. Then you'd want a 12k stone to put a good, comfortable edge on it. However, you can shave off an 8k. It's not *as* comfortable & sharp, but it works.

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 10-28-2012, 06:09 PM
#12
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Sir that was the most helpfully thing anybody has told me yet. Very straight forward I seriously appreciate it.

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 10-29-2012, 06:54 AM
#13
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I would say Lee is right, If your razors were in really good shave ready order, then that's all you would need is a Naniwa 12K stone just to occasionally refresh your edge and keep up the light maintenance, but If you are looking start from the beginning you are going to have to introduce your razor to a 1K bevel setting stone, then after that my personal progression 3K 5K 8K 12K chromium oxide and neastfoot oil pasted paddle strop then linen and finally leather, If you set the bevel correctly off the 1K stone then that razor should be able to easily pick off single hairs off your arm with just the lightest of touches, then it's a case of polishing refinement off every other stone.

Jamie.

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 10-29-2012, 09:31 AM
#14
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As you can see, there are many ways to skin the cat.

I personally use an 800, 2k, 5k, 8k, 12k, finisher progression.

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 10-29-2012, 11:23 AM
#15
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Well looks like I got some work cut out for me but I'm excited and ready and rearin to learn.

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 10-29-2012, 01:39 PM
#16
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You will need:

1k to set your bevel. This can be a Norton or Naniwa.

Either a Norton 4/8k, or a Naniwa 5k and 8k.

A Naniwa 12k as a finisher and for touch ups.

If you check the shaving forums, you can sometimes find good deals on used hones.

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 10-30-2012, 11:42 AM
#17
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Yeah I found a guy or two with some stones already, quite a helpful place this is.

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 10-30-2012, 02:36 PM
#18
  • gijames
  • Mile High Soldier
  • TN, USA
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(10-29-2012, 06:54 AM)Jamie Mahoney Wrote: ...If you set the bevel correctly off the 1K stone then that razor should be able to easily pick off single hairs off your arm with just the lightest of touches, then it's a case of polishing refinement off every other stone.

Jamie.

sooo... if one of my straights arrived, and is *not* able to slice through the midway point of hair on my arm with ease, then just stropping won't make it *shave ready*, and it may actually need to be honed starting from 800-1k?
BLAST IT!!! I have one straight that was used a few times. I did some slow stropping, but it has not helped it slice through the hair mid-shaft on my arm Sad
I started with using the old razor, because it is a little smaller than the new GD208, and I wanted to build up my dexterity with both hands before moving up in straight-size.

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 10-30-2012, 02:39 PM
#19
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You could put it to your face and do a test run, but seeing as you have a shave ready blade to test it against, you should have a pretty good picture of whether you should actually put it to your face or not.

Everyone's arm hairs are different, but for the majority of men, Jamie's test is correct.

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 10-30-2012, 04:52 PM
#20
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No one has mentioned lapping films? If I were to be looking to get into honing on a tight budget I'd go with some lapping films.

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