11-15-2012, 08:30 AM
#1
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This rather ratty looking blade just showed up for a day at the spa. It needed some help to remove some signs of aging.A nip here and a tuck there made the old girl look years younger.
I worked over the blade , duplicated the scales,, or rather made scales to look like what these once were , made up some triple stacks and reused the original wedge.
I've worked on 4 of this exact blade in the last month. What gives?

                                   
   

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 11-15-2012, 08:49 AM
#2
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Great work! That old razor has a whole new life, now.
Wonderful!

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 11-15-2012, 08:57 AM
#3
  • beartrap
  • Resident Цирюльник
  • Southern California
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Looks great as always. Love your razors!

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 11-15-2012, 09:02 AM
#4
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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That is the best example of before and after that I've seen in a long time.

Great job of bringing that old beauty back to life.

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 11-15-2012, 09:09 AM
#5
  • geezer
  • Senior Member
  • Menomonie, Western WI
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(11-15-2012, 08:30 AM)mycarver Wrote: This rather ratty looking blade just showed up for a day at the spa....snip...I've worked on 4 of this exact blade in the last month. What gives?
Very nice job of work there my friend. The razor looks original and has no reason to bow to any other razor I've seen!
~Richard

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 11-15-2012, 09:16 AM
#6
  • mikeperry
  • Senior Member
  • St Louis via the UK
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Absolutely stunning work, and the end result speaks for itself, simply gorgeous razor Clap

Would you mind briefly documenting the process you go through to bring a blade like that back to life? Or point me to where you've already done so. Thank you.

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 11-15-2012, 10:55 AM
#7
  • OldDog23
  • Senior Member
  • BeanTown MetroWest
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Gleams !! hit the jackpot in the "new lease on life" lottery ! splendid work !

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 11-15-2012, 11:14 AM
#8
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Thanks Guys, I appreciate the wonderful comments.
@ mikeperry,, well, Kavik's thread pretty much sums it up. Sanding,, and lots of it. If you spend any time ( well,, minimal at best) at a buffer,it's a mistake as he points out.

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 11-15-2012, 03:52 PM
#9
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Fantastic work, Mark!

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 11-16-2012, 10:24 AM
#10
  • mikeperry
  • Senior Member
  • St Louis via the UK
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(11-15-2012, 11:14 AM)mycarver Wrote: @ mikeperry,, well, Kavik's thread pretty much sums it up. Sanding,, and lots of it. If you spend any time ( well,, minimal at best) at a buffer,it's a mistake as he points out.

Hi

So hand-tools are king in restoring straight razors, or at least as far as you're concerned?

Take care, Mike

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 11-16-2012, 11:23 AM
#11
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Yes, Mike, I think so. It works and doesn't get you into trouble too quickly as some power tools can do if you're not careful or familiar with their operation . Granted , I can and do speed things up due to the volume of pieces I do, but it does work.
As Kavik pointed out the look of some pieces done on a buffer look simply awful in my opinion. A buffer isn't intended to be a short cut to restoring a blade. As he points out, shoulders look like melted wax, etchings get lost or obliterated when they could have easily been saved, spines get rounded over etc.
Buffers are used,,but SPARINGLY. They don't remove rust, pits etc. they only round it over and make a general mess in most cases. They only provide the final polish.
Just like doing body work on a car or even woodwork. It has to be sanded first before you try to polish it. Otherwise you get a shiny lumpy finish. Don't put the cart before the horse.
Same goes for tumblers in my opinion. They too might remove some rust, but don't level the surface to remove pits etc. They too only round the over , knock edges off scripts, spines etc. Both of these tools do not discriminate. They hit everything , when everything doesn't need to be hit.
I am of the opinion that shoulders , edges, scripts should remain on a blade for it to look like it originally did. That , to me, is restored. You may not always achieve a mirror polish,, but even that isn't necessary in all cases. But it looks nice if it can be done.
I think at times there is confusion about a 'shiny' blade, vs. a nicely polished blade. You can use a buffer to make rust shiny,, but I don't think it looks very good.
Besides,, most videos I've seen approach buffing in what I'd consider the improper way. Go to a shop that specializes in buffing and prepping metal and you'll never see half the stuff you see on some videos. Some I guess look for a short cut and it seems to work,, but it really doesn't.
Remember,, this is only my way of looking at the process.
I do what I do,, and others do what they do. I just like my results as they seem to be a bit different. Maybe not to most eyes that see only a shine,, but I feel the difference is there.

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 11-21-2012, 11:07 AM
#12
  • mikeperry
  • Senior Member
  • St Louis via the UK
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(11-16-2012, 11:23 AM)mycarver Wrote: Yes, Mike, I think so. It works and doesn't get you into trouble too quickly as some power tools can do if you're not careful or familiar with their operation . Granted , I can and do speed things up due to the volume of pieces I do, but it does work.

As Kavik pointed out the look of some pieces done on a buffer look simply awful in my opinion...

Hi

I tend to totally agree with what you've said above, it just makes good sense to me Thumbsup

Take care, Mike

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 11-21-2012, 11:37 AM
#13
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I recently made up a sample using an old junk blade. I sanded it, buffed it and am doing one in a tumbler. The differences are interesting.

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