11-18-2012, 05:46 AM
#1
  • Striky
  • Senior Member
  • Reipå, Norway
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Is there a site on the net with an overview/history of the Gem razors and the Ever Ready razors, like the on here about Schick razors?

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 11-18-2012, 06:02 AM
#2
  • 2dwgs
  • Member
  • North Carolina
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There are a few members over at the B&B who know a lot about the history of the GEM and Eveready razors. As I understand it, GEM and Eveready made the same razors at that point in time, but GEM was the US label, and Eveready was the U.K. label.

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 11-18-2012, 06:06 PM
#3
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GEM was started in 1898,it's roots go back to Star Razors EST 1875
Not much,but it's a start:
http://www.personna.com/personna/blades/...story/P30/

Here's a few of Shadow's Dad's Shavenook SE reviews:

http://shavenook.com/thread-se-razor-rev...912-family

http://shavenook.com/thread-se-razor-rev...tic-family

http://shavenook.com/thread-se-razor-rev...-vc1-2-3-4

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 11-18-2012, 08:07 PM
#4
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There is a forum where that info is discussed exclusively, but I don't know if it's acceptable form to post the address. It's SE razors only... no DE, no str8s, just SE.

Edit: It does require membership. It's no big deal though.
The Original Safety Too site

Other than what's been already posted I know of nothing. That doesn't mean it doesn't exist however.

Razorx, I probably should update at least the 1912 family review.

Oystein, Waits Safety Razor Compendium is a decent source. It's a $15 download e-book and is extremely comprehensive. It actually might be what you're looking for. If you purchase a copy get back to me if you can't figure out how to use it easily using the click on index. No one who has purchased it on my recommendation so far has told me that they regret spending the $. It's much bigger and much more comprehensive than you can possibly imagine. Just google it to find the download sites.

I just looked at the GEM section. It's 14 pages of chronological razor/company history. There's a lot on each page too. It claims the company began in 1898, but "has roots back to 1877" or some such meaning.

The EverReady section again, is 14 pages, of the same sort of coverage. It begins with the founding of the company in 1898 in lower Manhatten.

Anyway, I don't think you'll regret the $15 spent for a copy.

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 11-18-2012, 08:55 PM
#5
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post the link, Brian...we're not hostile towards that type of stuff.

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 11-19-2012, 07:21 AM
#6
  • Striky
  • Senior Member
  • Reipå, Norway
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Hi Brian, and thank you for a very informative post. The "Waits Safety Razor Compendium" seems very interesting, and well worth the money.

From a preview of the compendium:
"Separate sections cover the major
manufacturers: AutoStrop, Durham Duplex, Gillette (two parts), Kampfe, Rolls, Schick, USSR, Wilkinson, and the
American Safety Razor brands, Ever-Ready, Gem and Star


Does the compendium addresses all/most razors from these manufacturers, containing information like date codes etc?

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 11-19-2012, 01:47 PM
#7
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(11-19-2012, 07:21 AM)Striky Wrote: Hi Brian, and thank you for a very informative post. The "Waits Safety Razor Compendium" seems very interesting, and well worth the money.

From a preview of the compendium:
"Separate sections cover the major
manufacturers: AutoStrop, Durham Duplex, Gillette (two parts), Kampfe, Rolls, Schick, USSR, Wilkinson, and the
American Safety Razor brands, Ever-Ready, Gem and Star


Does the compendium addresses all/most razors from these manufacturers, containing information like date codes etc?

Date codes are there from Gillette, but that's no big deal anyway since they are available from other sources as well. I know they're found on B&B.

Hey, just buy a copy. If you don't like it, do I have a deal for you! You can buy me a beer so that I can hang my head in my hands and drown my sorrow in suds, OK? Biggrin But I really don't think I'll be having that beer on you.

Edit: Not all manufacturers used date codes. Gillette is the only one that I know of that did.

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 11-19-2012, 04:25 PM
#8
  • Striky
  • Senior Member
  • Reipå, Norway
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(11-19-2012, 01:47 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Hey, just buy a copy. If you don't like it, do I have a deal for you! You can buy me a beer so that I can hang my head in my hands and drown my sorrow in suds, OK? Biggrin But I really don't think I'll be having that beer on you.

Easy now Brian Smile I made up my mind right after reading the preview, that I will buy it. It is very interesting reading, and I love to know everything there is about vintage razors I have.

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 11-19-2012, 09:54 PM
#9
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I kinda figured I woudn't get that beer! Biggrin I thought you'd like it.

The only Norwegian beer I ever had I can't remember the name of... very very dark. Delicious! Ringnes? Does that make sense?

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 11-20-2012, 01:08 AM
#10
  • Striky
  • Senior Member
  • Reipå, Norway
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A little off topic, but here it goes Smile

Yes, Ringnes is a Norwegian beer brand. However, Ringnes is not my Norwegian go-to brand, and I have never tried any of their darker beers other then their Christmas beers (which is a "semi" dark beer). Christmas beer is an old Norwegian tradition with roots long before the Vikings. Historically, there has been a wide local variation, but today most Christmas beers are related to bayer and bokk. Much sweetness of caramelized malt and rich flavor of the spices to match both Christmas food and the atmosphere.

Is it common with a similar Christmas beer in the States?

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 11-20-2012, 02:19 PM
#11
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Oystein, it's your thread my friend. You can allow it to go anywhere you want once you have the answer to your question. I thought you had your answer.

American beers... you really don't want to get me going on the subject. I began brewing my own to remove myself from the "programmmed" American beer scene and to drink some really good beer that at the time weren't being made. A lot of that has changed in the last few years.

I suppose micro brewed beers might have some sort of "holiday beers" but it's nothing like what you know of. Most Americans (yes, I'm painting with a broad brush, and there are exceptions- my apologies to those folks ahead of time) know just a few styles of beer (at most and if that many) and are clueless that beer has many tens of thousands of variations among the many styles.

I can find all sorts of beers locally (fruit, spice, wheat, so many!), so I don't brew my own anymore.

But I do miss the extremely dark (syrupy almost) Ringnes I bought in northern NJ 40 years ago. Just a few years later the "same" style, at least on the label, was watered down or something. I know it was no longer the same as what I had been buying.

There needs to be a market and w/o folks to buy it, it simply can't exist. No, we don't have the Holiday beers you know of. I wish we did.

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 11-21-2012, 02:30 PM
#12
  • Grumpy
  • Senior Member
  • DisneyLand
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For many Americans - Budweiser is the King of Beers.

A Long Time Ago (Before Prohibition 1919 to 1933) many American Cities had their own Breweries.

Then when the Dark Days Arrived (Prohibition 1919 to 1933) and with the onset of the Depression and with World War II and with the Explosion of Economic Growth after World War II and with Mass Production and the Interstate Highway System and Bigger & Better Trucks (18 Wheelers) and Advertising and Television ... and other factors that I don't know ... Many Americans were convinced that they should enjoy the products that could be mass made and that you could not do without.

So there were national brands and local brands.

If you were lucky you had a good local brand or found a store that would import.

Otherwise you were stuck with the National Brands.

As speciality stores came about you could get some foreign beers and enjoy the differences.

Now with MicroBrewed Beers ... Restrauants can make a limited amount of Beer on their premises and now there are lots more to choose from.

Then there are small MicroBreweries taht make speciality beers and you can find them in some of the stores.

But, for most Americans it is still a National Brand and Bud is the King of Beers.

But I like many types of beers and I like to tell Bud Drinkers that it is partially made with Rice and under The Reinheitsgebot Bud is really not a beer.

But, Sad to Say ... I agree with ShadowsDad.

America may drink a lot of beer but, most of them don't know what they are drinking.

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 11-29-2012, 05:14 AM
#13
  • Striky
  • Senior Member
  • Reipå, Norway
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(11-20-2012, 02:19 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Oystein, it's your thread my friend. You can allow it to go anywhere you want once you have the answer to your question. I thought you had your answer.

American beers... you really don't want to get me going on the subject. I began brewing my own to remove myself from the "programmmed" American beer scene and to drink some really good beer that at the time weren't being made. A lot of that has changed in the last few years.

I suppose micro brewed beers might have some sort of "holiday beers" but it's nothing like what you know of. Most Americans (yes, I'm painting with a broad brush, and there are exceptions- my apologies to those folks ahead of time) know just a few styles of beer (at most and if that many) and are clueless that beer has many tens of thousands of variations among the many styles.

I can find all sorts of beers locally (fruit, spice, wheat, so many!), so I don't brew my own anymore.

But I do miss the extremely dark (syrupy almost) Ringnes I bought in northern NJ 40 years ago. Just a few years later the "same" style, at least on the label, was watered down or something. I know it was no longer the same as what I had been buying.

There needs to be a market and w/o folks to buy it, it simply can't exist. No, we don't have the Holiday beers you know of. I wish we did.

Yes, I have my answer Smile

Now, back to beer.

My take on American beers, are close to a scene i saw in Monty Python episode. And no disrespect about Bud or any other American beers, I know they are loved, respected and popular. They are just not my cup of tea. Well, the joke:

"American beer is a bit like making love in a canoe.... It's fucking close to water" (Monty Python).

However, I have only tried Budweiser, (Sol and Coronna are south American beers?). For me Budweiser has little/weak taste, and no character. While I like it to have a distinct aroma and flavor. Thats why I love a darker beer so much, and especially the Norwegian Christmas beer.

Again, no disrespect, but it's quite funny Smile

"The leaders of the big beer companies meet for a drink. The president of Budweiser orders a Bud, the CEO of Miller gets a Miller, the head of Coors orders a Coors, and so on. Until it's Arthur Guinness's turn. He orders a soda. "Why didn't you order a Guinness?" everyone asks. Guinness replies, "if you guys aren't having beer, then neither will I."


A friend of mine is brewing his own beer, and he has one brand I really like. I don't know what it's called, but I will start brewing it myself soon. Brewing beer is a fine hobby Smile

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 11-29-2012, 01:42 PM
#14
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Too funny.

There is a reason most American beers are served as cold as possible. It covers what little flavor is there. That's not a put down, that's the truth. Rice in a beers ingredient list only contributes alcohol and no flavor, but it's extremely inexpensive.

When I was stationed in West Germany ('70-'73), of course beer is everywhere there, but my favorite beer I'd find a short train trip to Mainz, and across from the bahnhof was the Bier Tunnel. Good food and great beers from Munich. A great change from the prevasive lagers of the Mainz/Bad Kreuznach area near where I was stationed. I never thought I'd complain about German beers, but one can only take so many lagers before complete boredom sets in... "Yet another lager...".

When I was home brewing I liked my beer just slightly cool to allow the flavor to shine through. One Barley Wine Ale that I made, yes for holidays and special dinners/occaisons, tasted of many different fruits, yet it was purely grain. Naturally occurring organic chemistry did the magic. I had a wine connoisseur taste it one time and he tasted all sorts of fruits and berries, and almost couldn't believe that it was only barley and hops. The head on that BWA was incredibly creamy, it was simply a superb brew. It was also upwards of 30 proof and the nose knew it too.

My standard brews were an English Amber, a Stout, a Porter, and in the summer a wheat beer. There was the occaisonal special brew. But I'd have 20+ cases of my standards aging or ready to drink.

I need to do that again. I really miss it. Heck, I need to find my beer recipes.

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 01-03-2013, 04:17 PM
#15
  • Striky
  • Senior Member
  • Reipå, Norway
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I have to start brewing myself soon. Been moveing and working alot latly, so beer brewing have not been a priority.

Just though I share a picture of one Norwegian Christmas beer I enjoyed this Christmas. A Aas Juleøl Premium. Sorry for the poor quality picture, it's taken with my phone.

   

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 01-03-2013, 04:34 PM
#16
  • Grumpy
  • Senior Member
  • DisneyLand
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No Offense is taken in the discussion of American Beers (The National Brands).

We do have some regional producers (however, some of these get bought out by The Big Boys) and there are some places (restrauants, pubs, bars) that produce their own brands.

And, of course, there is home brewing.

So we are not all locked into what the National Brands are making.

But, a Beer should have some character and that is usually what I look for when I get a Beer.

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 01-03-2013, 04:57 PM
#17
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Brian directed me to the Safety Razor Compendium awhile back... Not a bad way to spend $15 at all...that thing will give you all you ever wanted to know and more. A word of caution however, the SRC has the ability to send one spiraling into severe RAD.

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 01-03-2013, 08:35 PM
#18
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alex2363 is usually a wealth of knowledge concerning razors. Maybe we can get him to pop his head in this thread.

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 01-04-2013, 09:47 AM
#19
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Perhaps I should go get a copy of the Compendium as well, and read it while having a beer or two...

...not a Rignes Pilsner though; that sh*t is like cat piss. Much prefer a decent ale or a stout.

Øystein; Aas makes good beers - just a shame they are usually sold out when I go shopping Sad

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 01-04-2013, 10:06 AM
#20
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Hans, when you unpack the book, just dump it all in one directory. Then find the file SRC_TOC.pdf and create a shortcut to it on your desktop. To use the book just click on your shortcut and there it is. There is one bug, and I contacted the author, but he can't fix it. When you go to the Kampfe section and try to return to the Table Of Contents it won't do it. Close it out and restart. That's the only bug I've found.

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