03-25-2012, 05:13 PM
#21
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What a great tip! Thank you.

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 03-25-2012, 06:50 PM
#22
  • MaxP
  • Senior Member
  • Madison, WI
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(03-25-2012, 05:13 PM)Bowlturner Wrote: What a great tip! Thank you.

+1. Thanks for sharing.

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 03-26-2012, 04:46 AM
#23
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This is a proven method of knot removal (from our days) and well worth showing on here - well done!

We used to have a contraption that worked along the lines of a steam bath where brushes sent to us for restoration were suspended above boiling water to allow the knots to loosen and work free from the handles.
From experience, caution should be taken with wooden and ivory handled brushes as the expansion and contraction that occurs can cause splitting in the handle. Also the steam method always worked well on older brushes where the glue used wasn't of the same ilk as today's modern epoxies (originally pearl barley 'syrup' was used quite widely as a glue for fixing knots). I can't comment on how efficient the steaming method is on modern brushes - that will be down to trial and error for all of you guys brave enough to experiment!

Gary

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 03-26-2012, 07:38 AM
#24
  • Teiste
  • Moderator Emeritus
  • Salt Lake City,UT
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(03-26-2012, 04:46 AM)Gary Young Wrote: This is a proven method of knot removal (from our days) and well worth showing on here - well done!

We used to have a contraption that worked along the lines of a steam bath where brushes sent to us for restoration were suspended above boiling water to allow the knots to loosen and work free from the handles.
From experience, caution should be taken with wooden and ivory handled brushes as the expansion and contraction that occurs can cause splitting in the handle. Also the steam method always worked well on older brushes where the glue used wasn't of the same ilk as today's modern epoxies (originally pearl barley 'syrup' was used quite widely as a glue for fixing knots). I can't comment on how efficient the steaming method is on modern brushes - that will be down to trial and error for all of you guys brave enough to experiment!

Gary

Gary :

thanks a lot for your remarks and also I haven't attempted to try this method on a Simpson brush,but Yohann did and he couldn't loose the knot,so that says a lot about the quality of the Simpson brushes.

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 03-26-2012, 07:43 AM
#25
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Teiste -

I didn't use it on a Simpson - I tried it on a vintage Kent.

Part of the problem with that brush was that -

A) I didn't want the label to come off, and

B) The knot is so small that I could only hold on to it with one finger and a thumb, so I couldn't really apply any force.


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 03-26-2012, 07:50 AM
#26
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I've tried a similar method (brush in boiling water for ~5 min.) on a Vulfix boar - It worked like a charm. Thumbsup

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 03-26-2012, 08:34 AM
#27
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Do you think this would be safe for a Lucite handle?

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 03-26-2012, 08:34 AM
#28
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Do you think this would be safe for a Lucite handle?

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 03-26-2012, 09:04 AM
#29
  • mikeperry
  • Senior Member
  • St Louis via the UK
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(03-25-2012, 08:36 AM)mikeperry Wrote:
(03-22-2012, 09:04 AM)Teiste Wrote: I had some boar brushes that I decided to remove their knots and made them badger brushes with some The Golden Nib knots.

[SNIP]

Let me know if you have tried too and with what results.

Wish me luck, I'm about to try your ingenious but simple knot removal method on an Oemga 11047 Mixed Badger/Boar Loft shaving brush (unable to use brush due to finding out I'm allergic to Boar hair).

Hi Teiste

It worked nicely, but took 3½ hours in the steam bath to loosen the knot enough for removal...

Take care, Mike

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 03-26-2012, 09:47 AM
#30
  • Teiste
  • Moderator Emeritus
  • Salt Lake City,UT
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(03-26-2012, 07:43 AM)yohannrjm Wrote: Teiste -

I didn't use it on a Simpson - I tried it on a vintage Kent.

Part of the problem with that brush was that -

A) I didn't want the label to come off, and

B) The knot is so small that I could only hold on to it with one finger and a thumb, so I couldn't really apply any force.

Sorry man and interesting what happened to that brush.

(03-26-2012, 07:50 AM)oversaturn Wrote: I've tried a similar method (brush in boiling water for ~5 min.) on a Vulfix boar - It worked like a charm. Thumbsup

Oh man,I know what brush is that...I love how it looks now!!!!Biggrin

Can you explain the method that you used?

(03-26-2012, 08:34 AM)insomniac Wrote: Do you think this would be safe for a Lucite handle?

Yes,it should work,but be careful with the handle and hot water.

(03-26-2012, 09:04 AM)mikeperry Wrote:
(03-25-2012, 08:36 AM)mikeperry Wrote:
(03-22-2012, 09:04 AM)Teiste Wrote: I had some boar brushes that I decided to remove their knots and made them badger brushes with some The Golden Nib knots.

[SNIP]

Let me know if you have tried too and with what results.

Wish me luck, I'm about to try your ingenious but simple knot removal method on an Oemga 11047 Mixed Badger/Boar Loft shaving brush (unable to use brush due to finding out I'm allergic to Boar hair).

Hi Teiste

It worked nicely, but took 3½ hours in the steam bath to loosen the knot enough for removal...

Take care, Mike

Oh boy,3 and a half hours?Well,at the end it was removed,which was he goal.What knot are you gonna put in that handle?

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 03-26-2012, 10:00 AM
#31
  • mikeperry
  • Senior Member
  • St Louis via the UK
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(03-26-2012, 09:47 AM)Teiste Wrote: Oh boy,3 and a half hours?Well,at the end it was removed,which was he goal.What knot are you gonna put in that handle?

Hi Teiste

Yep! 3½ hours, once it got to 2 hours in, I almost gave up, but decided it was a battle I wanted to try and win...

I plan to purchase and install a 20mm Finest Badger Knot XH from The Golden Nib. Thinking it will make a perfect travel brush, plus the odd use in my brush rotation (I only face lather).

Take care, Mike

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 03-26-2012, 11:32 AM
#32
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(03-26-2012, 09:47 AM)Teiste Wrote:
(03-26-2012, 07:50 AM)oversaturn Wrote: I've tried a similar method (brush in boiling water for ~5 min.) on a Vulfix boar - It worked like a charm. Thumbsup

Oh man,I know what brush is that...I love how it looks now!!!!Biggrin

Can you explain the method that you used?

Well, it was nothing fancy - I've read your post on the Spanish forum, but I didn't understood it very well - my Spanish language skills are not very good...Tongue So I thought "hey, these Vulfix handles are tough material anyway", so just threw the brush into a pot with boiling water for 5-10 minutes and the knot came out fine Biggrin

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 03-29-2012, 09:06 AM
#33
  • Brent
  • Active Member
  • Columbus, OH
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(03-25-2012, 12:13 PM)PanchoVilla Wrote: Thanks Teiste, it worked like a charm. Here's my first attempt.

The brush always was pretty 'scritchy' and just sat in a box. Now, off to TGN.

[Image: knot.jpg]

Pretty sweet handle you found there Bob!

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 04-03-2012, 09:47 PM
#34
  • byrd
  • Ex-Lurker
  • Fort Worth, TX
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Great info....I wish I had read this months ago. Oh well, I have a few project brushes still. I am pretty sure that this post will cost me money somehow or another!!!!

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 04-04-2012, 11:17 AM
#35
  • Edson
  • Artisan Razor Restorer
  • Oregon
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This is an excellent post and idea!!

I wish I knew about it when I was doing brush restorations a long time ago.

I'm soooooo tempted to pick up a Semogue LE Badger #1 now and give this a whirl to put it in a custom handle. Already own the #2 and it is probably my second favorite brush behind a Rooney Finest 1/2.

Held off on the LE #1 for awhile because I didn't want something with the same handle.

Tempting.....


Anyone try this on any current semogue handles?

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 04-06-2012, 03:22 AM
#36
  • Amzimbo
  • Smooth as a fresh shaven diplomat
  • New Jersey and Mozambique
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I tried it on an early Victorian silver handled travel brush (hallmarked for 1834) that had a tiny, incredibly stiff boar knot which was simply unusable (it was like trying to lather with a steel brush). Unfortunately, the steam method didn't work, so I had to use a Dremel. Turns out the knot was set in plaster, or something like. But I'm gonna try it on a more modern brush for my next restore.

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 04-06-2012, 10:59 AM
#37
  • mikeperry
  • Senior Member
  • St Louis via the UK
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Hi Teiste

Today I decided to take my very first shaving brush (an Edwin Jagger Best Badger) and give it a steam bath to remove the knot, this time 50 minutes was enough to loosen the knot for easy removal Aaaaa

Tomorrow I plan to thoroughly clean the inside of the two handles I now have de-knotted and set in new knots (received today from The Golden Nib): Once I have the new knots set in the handles I will post a few photos...

Take care, Mike

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 04-06-2012, 11:07 AM
#38
  • Teiste
  • Moderator Emeritus
  • Salt Lake City,UT
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(04-06-2012, 10:59 AM)mikeperry Wrote: Hi Teiste

Today I decided to take my very first shaving brush (an Edwin Jagger Best Badger) and give it a steam bath to remove the knot, this time 50 minutes was enough to loosen the knot for easy removal Aaaaa

Tomorrow I plan to thoroughly clean the inside of the two handles I now have de-knotted and set in new knots (received today from The Golden Nib): Once I have the new knots set in the handles I will post a few photos...

Take care, Mike

Mike,great to know!

Im already making a video of it with a Vulfix 404 mixed boar/badger brush (I will use the handle to re knot a finest badger hair knot).

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 04-06-2012, 11:37 AM
#39
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(04-06-2012, 03:22 AM)Amzimbo Wrote: I tried it on an early Victorian silver handled travel brush (hallmarked for 1834) that had a tiny, incredibly stiff boar knot which was simply unusable (it was like trying to lather with a steel brush). Unfortunately, the steam method didn't work, so I had to use a Dremel. Turns out the knot was set in plaster, or something like. But I'm gonna try it on a more modern brush for my next restore.

Normaly a gypsum fix would be used for silver handled brushes of that era.

Gary

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 04-06-2012, 02:05 PM
#40
  • Amzimbo
  • Smooth as a fresh shaven diplomat
  • New Jersey and Mozambique
User Info
I tried this on an old silver cased travel brush(hallmarked for 1834) whose short bristle knot was like lathering with steel wool. Didn't work and had to take a Dremel to it. Turns out the knot was set in plaster, or some chalky equivalent.

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