11-23-2012, 08:55 PM
#1
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so I loaded a brand new GEM stainless into my razor 2 weeks ago to shave.....fast forward to today when I was pulling the blade out of my razor to put it into my featherweight to find that it had rust spots on both sides of the blade.

lesson learned: wipe the blade off when you're done so water doesn't sit on the blade until it eventually dries out on its own.

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 11-23-2012, 09:16 PM
#2
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i do that with all my blades and razors after i finish the shave. Takes such little time.

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 11-23-2012, 10:01 PM
#3
  • beartrap
  • Resident Цирюльник
  • Southern California
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That's very common if you leave the blade in. Just some crazy reaction between those 2 metals Undecided

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 11-23-2012, 11:38 PM
#4
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Never had that happen with GEM Coated SS Blades.I don't rotate razors,I usually throw those blades in my Single Edge razor and get 14 shaves from them without ever opening the razor the entire two weeks.I rinse the razor under hot tap water after every shave and put it away wet...no drying.Just checked the plastic cup of old SE blades I've used over the past few months and still don't see a speck of rust on any of them.

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 11-24-2012, 08:50 AM
#5
  • Deano
  • Senior Member
  • Iowa
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I always rinse the razor with hot water, blow out what water I can then give it a quick swish in a small jar of alcohol I have just for this process. I do this after every shave no matter what razor im using. Does it help *shrug* all I know is ive found no rusty blades in my razors.

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 11-24-2012, 03:23 PM
#6
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Razorx, I suspect water may also be a factor. I've had the same results you've had. But my water is about as pure as water from a sanitary well can get. Do you have the same?

A rusty SS blade is just nuts!

Andrew, this post gives me some other ideas for your after shaving skin problems. If you've followed the gist, no doubt you are thinking along the same lines. By law your water supplier must give you a water analysis. It'll probably only require a phone call. Please obtain one. I'd like to see it. If there is a more detailed analysis, that's the one I'd like to see. An e-copy is fine and easy to forward.

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 11-24-2012, 04:48 PM
#7
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(11-24-2012, 03:23 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Razorx, I suspect water may also be a factor. I've had the same results you've had. But my water is about as pure as water from a sanitary well can get. Do you have the same?

A rusty SS blade is just nuts!

Andrew, this post gives me some other ideas for your after shaving skin problems. If you've followed the gist, no doubt you are thinking along the same lines. By law your water supplier must give you a water analysis. It'll probably only require a phone call. Please obtain one. I'd like to see it. If there is a more detailed analysis, that's the one I'd like to see. An e-copy is fine and easy to forward.

I can look into that.

we did have a company come out about a year ago to possibly install a whole house reverse osmosis system, but it was way too expensive. anyhow, he did some tests on our water and found that it is extremely hard.

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 11-24-2012, 07:34 PM
#8
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(11-24-2012, 04:48 PM)andrewjs18 Wrote:
(11-24-2012, 03:23 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Razorx, I suspect water may also be a factor. I've had the same results you've had. But my water is about as pure as water from a sanitary well can get. Do you have the same?

A rusty SS blade is just nuts!

Andrew, this post gives me some other ideas for your after shaving skin problems. If you've followed the gist, no doubt you are thinking along the same lines. By law your water supplier must give you a water analysis. It'll probably only require a phone call. Please obtain one. I'd like to see it. If there is a more detailed analysis, that's the one I'd like to see. An e-copy is fine and easy to forward.

I can look into that.

we did have a company come out about a year ago to possibly install a whole house reverse osmosis system, but it was way too expensive. anyhow, he did some tests on our water and found that it is extremely hard.

Sounds like Brian might be on to something Andrew,worth checking it out.

Our Village supply is provided by the Central Lake County Joint Action Water Agency which draws water from Lake Michigan and purifies it with several water treatment processes including ozone, coagulation, flocculation, activated carbon filtration, ultraviolet light and chlorination.

I guess it must be good stuff,I know any soap I use lathers easily - The info I'm seeing says: CLCJAWA was the third water treatment plant in the United States to win the Partnership for Safe Water "Excellence in Drinking Water" Phase IV award and the first conventional water treatment plant to achieve this status.

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 11-24-2012, 08:26 PM
#9
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Sounds good Razorx. Most of what's listed is to get rid of bugs and solids. the ACF is there to remove metals, chemicals, and such. Basically you not only have water that's safe to drink, but healthful as well. Lots of water supplies treat the water to kill the bugs but leave most everything else in the water... the carcinogens, heavy metals, basically everything that upstream flushed downstream.

That's what I'm thinking about Andrews water. I think he's at the bottom of the Delaware river (?) and everyone else gets to use the water first. I'm hoping a water report will also have the source and the treatment(s) applied. But if not, just looking at what remains in the water will tell a lot. I just wish I knew more about it. I only know basics.

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 11-24-2012, 11:04 PM
#10
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(11-24-2012, 07:34 PM)razorx Wrote:
(11-24-2012, 04:48 PM)andrewjs18 Wrote:
(11-24-2012, 03:23 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Razorx, I suspect water may also be a factor. I've had the same results you've had. But my water is about as pure as water from a sanitary well can get. Do you have the same?

A rusty SS blade is just nuts!

Andrew, this post gives me some other ideas for your after shaving skin problems. If you've followed the gist, no doubt you are thinking along the same lines. By law your water supplier must give you a water analysis. It'll probably only require a phone call. Please obtain one. I'd like to see it. If there is a more detailed analysis, that's the one I'd like to see. An e-copy is fine and easy to forward.

I can look into that.

we did have a company come out about a year ago to possibly install a whole house reverse osmosis system, but it was way too expensive. anyhow, he did some tests on our water and found that it is extremely hard.

Sounds like Brian might be on to something Andrew,worth checking it out.

Our Village supply is provided by the Central Lake County Joint Action Water Agency which draws water from Lake Michigan and purifies it with several water treatment processes including ozone, coagulation, flocculation, activated carbon filtration, ultraviolet light and chlorination.

I guess it must be good stuff,I know any soap I use lathers easily - The info I'm seeing says: CLCJAWA was the third water treatment plant in the United States to win the Partnership for Safe Water "Excellence in Drinking Water" Phase IV award and the first conventional water treatment plant to achieve this status.

all the water around here is hard unless you purify it at the house level.

(11-24-2012, 08:26 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Sounds good Razorx. Most of what's listed is to get rid of bugs and solids. the ACF is there to remove metals, chemicals, and such. Basically you not only have water that's safe to drink, but healthful as well. Lots of water supplies treat the water to kill the bugs but leave most everything else in the water... the carcinogens, heavy metals, basically everything that upstream flushed downstream.

That's what I'm thinking about Andrews water. I think he's at the bottom of the Delaware river (?) and everyone else gets to use the water first. I'm hoping a water report will also have the source and the treatment(s) applied. But if not, just looking at what remains in the water will tell a lot. I just wish I knew more about it. I only know basics.

I'm very close to the Delaware river.

here's the report for my zip code: https://www.aquaamerica.com/WaterQuality...460073.pdf

are you trying to say that the water may be irritating my face?

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 11-24-2012, 11:59 PM
#11
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That's precisely what I suspect.

Andrew, everything must be on the table for examination if you want to come to grips with this.

I don't like that they have a composite sample for the byproducts of chlorination. I used to do testing. Anything can be hidden in a composite sample, especially if pressure is applied to the tester to come up with "good" results. By their very nature composite samples are deliberately designed to hide out of spec. samples by producing an average. But for a time what was put into the pipe is crap. By averaging many "pipes" you have no idea what's in yours. You could have pure crap and it gets lost in the average.

It's late and I just reacted to what struck me initially. I'll devote more time to it tomorrow.

I will do more research about byproduct chemicals (I promise nothing), and if someone more knowledgeable about water treatment comes forward I'll defer to them.

You might want to use distilled water for your shaving for the next few shaves, that includes washing and rinsing, and see if there is an improvement. Yes, I know we're changing lots of things, but we can whittle down the list later if you see any improvement.

I DO NOT trust municipal water supplies unless they have carbon filtration. That shows they actually care about water quality. The others are putting on a show IMO. Especially if you get your water from the anus of the water supply. There are thousands of chemicals in the water under those conditions and this analysis shows just a few.

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 11-25-2012, 12:04 AM
#12
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(11-24-2012, 11:59 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: That's precisely what I suspect.

Andrew, everything must be on the table for examination if you want to come to grips with this.

I don't like that they have a composite sample for the byproducts of chlorination. I used to do testing. Anything can be hidden in a composite sample, especially if pressure is applied to the tester to come up with "good" results. By their very nature composite samples are deliberately designed to hide out of spec. samples by producing an average. But for a time what was put into the pipe is crap. By averaging many "pipes" you have no idea what's in yours. You could have pure crap and it gets lost in the average.

It's late and I just reacted to what struck me initially. I'll devote more time to it tomorrow.

I will do more research about byproduct chemicals (I promise nothing), and if someone more knowledgeable about water treatment comes forward I'll defer to them.

You might want to use distilled water for your shaving for the next few shaves, that includes washing and rinsing, and see if there is an improvement. Yes, I know we're changing lots of things, but we can whittle down the list later if you see any improvement.

I DO NOT trust municipal water supplies unless they have carbon filtration. That shows they actually care about water quality. The others are putting on a show IMO. Especially if you get your water from the anus of the water supply. There are thousands of chemicals in the water under those conditions and this analysis shows just a few.

I do happen to keep a few bottles of distilled water in my house. I guess for my next shave I'll completely avoid using the tap water. I'll soak my brush tips in distilled water, use distilled water to wet my face, to add water to my lather if it's too dry and then just fill up my sink with distilled water to rinse off my razor blade during the shave. of course post shave would continue with the use of distilled water.

I'll test the theory on Tuesday night when I shave again. I'll continue to use the cade soap and the gem featherweight so as to not change up too much stuff.

getting a whole house water filtration system is on the list of improvements we want to make to our house. we have a reverse osmosis system next to our kitchen faucet that we use a lot for our drinking water.

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 11-25-2012, 01:48 AM
#13
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Andrew I routinely rinse my razor during the shave in a small plastic bowl of scalding hot water.Nice because it conserves water and I can shake the razor around vigorously without caring if it bangs against the plastic walls of the container.Since you're running a trial with distilled,rinsing in a smaller receptacle will stretch you supply further.

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 11-25-2012, 09:41 AM
#14
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(11-25-2012, 01:48 AM)razorx Wrote: Andrew I routinely rinse my razor during the shave in a small plastic bowl of scalding hot water.Nice because it conserves water and I can shake the razor around vigorously without caring if it bangs against the plastic walls of the container.Since you're running a trial with distilled,rinsing in a smaller receptacle will stretch you supply further.

good point!

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 11-25-2012, 11:18 AM
#15
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If it turns out to be water, and let's keep our minds open that your water might be OK, there are water filtration units that can be put at a sink. I'd hate to see you be forced to treat the water you flush with.

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 11-25-2012, 12:44 PM
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(11-25-2012, 11:18 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote: If it turns out to be water, and let's keep our minds open that your water might be OK, there are water filtration units that can be put at a sink. I'd hate to see you be forced to treat the water you flush with.

true, but it's probably more economical to install a system for all the taps and showers and dish washer and washing machine rather than doing it on select locations.

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 11-26-2012, 10:09 AM
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Andrew, I spent some time reearching your water as seen in the water report and digging a little deeper into the chlorination byproducts.

Before I get going, the following is precisely the reason I consider activated carbon filtration to be essential for drinking water treatment from a municipal water supply.

If you begin reading the text at the beginning of the report it discusses the various nasty chemicals present in the source water, but it's impossible to test for all contaminants. You can see the water sources and know better than I do what's upstream. That's what's in your water.

I saw that the water is treated for bacteria but nowhere did I see mention of any treatment/filtration for the chemicals that they can't test for. What's in the water? Frankly, I don't know, and neither does your water supplier, but they still assure you that it's safe.

They've got to be doing at least basic water treatment for turbidity and filtration, but they don't say exactly what they do.I checked their site, and it's the typical 'net site for public consumption, with no real information.

Their chlorination treatment alone produces hundreds of by product chemicals and they admit that they only test for a handful. I'm not trying to scare you, and your water may not be causing your skin problems. But it also might be.

Someone suggested a Brita filter. That could be an inexpensive way to test better filtered water on your skin. I also think I'd carbon filter all of the water I was consuming from your supposedly safe tap water.

Copy and paste into google some of the chemicals your water supplier monitors for. Some have an average ND (not detectable) result shown on the report, then the rate they detected is the next column. I remember one of those chemicals being at 0-3.7. So the composite sample shows nothing but at least one source showed the chemical. Where is your water coming from? Do all of the water sources come together into a tank, get mixed together, treated and piped out? Or is some water treated at the source and piped directly to you? It doesn't say.

FWIW, your water supply is probably no worse than anyone elses in most suburban and urban USA settings. I'm not saying that's good or bad, it just is.

When we lived in NJ the town upriver had their discharge approx. 100 yards upstream from my towns intake. Each town had the same basic setup. Each upstream town treated waste water, then dumped the effluent, and every downstream town treated it and drank it. We had some wells also, same as your water report says you have.

BTW, we got out of dodge. That was just one of the reasons. It just didn't make sense for good health that pharmacuticals, Chemo, industrial waste, and whatever, got discharged, then treated and consumed and health won't suffer. Lots of the chemicals in treated wastewater aren't captured at all, but just pass through to be chlorinated and consumed downstream. If the first chemical wasn't bad enough, the chlorine treatment morphs a certain percentage of those chemicals into new chemicals.

For now I think the experiment of using distilled water is a good first step. See what happens. If it fails you'll know at least one thing... That distilled water doesn't help.

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 11-26-2012, 11:56 PM
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(11-26-2012, 10:09 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Andrew, I spent some time reearching your water as seen in the water report and digging a little deeper into the chlorination byproducts.

Before I get going, the following is precisely the reason I consider activated carbon filtration to be essential for drinking water treatment from a municipal water supply.

If you begin reading the text at the beginning of the report it discusses the various nasty chemicals present in the source water, but it's impossible to test for all contaminants. You can see the water sources and know better than I do what's upstream. That's what's in your water.

I saw that the water is treated for bacteria but nowhere did I see mention of any treatment/filtration for the chemicals that they can't test for. What's in the water? Frankly, I don't know, and neither does your water supplier, but they still assure you that it's safe.

They've got to be doing at least basic water treatment for turbidity and filtration, but they don't say exactly what they do.I checked their site, and it's the typical 'net site for public consumption, with no real information.

Their chlorination treatment alone produces hundreds of by product chemicals and they admit that they only test for a handful. I'm not trying to scare you, and your water may not be causing your skin problems. But it also might be.

Someone suggested a Brita filter. That could be an inexpensive way to test better filtered water on your skin. I also think I'd carbon filter all of the water I was consuming from your supposedly safe tap water.

Copy and paste into google some of the chemicals your water supplier monitors for. Some have an average ND (not detectable) result shown on the report, then the rate they detected is the next column. I remember one of those chemicals being at 0-3.7. So the composite sample shows nothing but at least one source showed the chemical. Where is your water coming from? Do all of the water sources come together into a tank, get mixed together, treated and piped out? Or is some water treated at the source and piped directly to you? It doesn't say.

FWIW, your water supply is probably no worse than anyone elses in most suburban and urban USA settings. I'm not saying that's good or bad, it just is.

When we lived in NJ the town upriver had their discharge approx. 100 yards upstream from my towns intake. Each town had the same basic setup. Each upstream town treated waste water, then dumped the effluent, and every downstream town treated it and drank it. We had some wells also, same as your water report says you have.

BTW, we got out of dodge. That was just one of the reasons. It just didn't make sense for good health that pharmacuticals, Chemo, industrial waste, and whatever, got discharged, then treated and consumed and health won't suffer. Lots of the chemicals in treated wastewater aren't captured at all, but just pass through to be chlorinated and consumed downstream. If the first chemical wasn't bad enough, the chlorine treatment morphs a certain percentage of those chemicals into new chemicals.

For now I think the experiment of using distilled water is a good first step. See what happens. If it fails you'll know at least one thing... That distilled water doesn't help.

thanks for continuing to look into this.

question, is water that passes through a reverse osmosis system the same as distilled water?

I buy distilled water, but it dawned on me that I probably don't need to buy distilled water since I have a reverse osmosis system installed on my kitchen sink water supply line.

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 11-27-2012, 05:00 PM
#19
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Someone else will need to answer this. Andrew, what I thought I knew about RO may not be correct.

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 11-27-2012, 05:11 PM
#20
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(11-26-2012, 11:56 PM)andrewjs18 Wrote:
(11-26-2012, 10:09 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Andrew, I spent some time reearching your water as seen in the water report and digging a little deeper into the chlorination byproducts.

Before I get going, the following is precisely the reason I consider activated carbon filtration to be essential for drinking water treatment from a municipal water supply.

If you begin reading the text at the beginning of the report it discusses the various nasty chemicals present in the source water, but it's impossible to test for all contaminants. You can see the water sources and know better than I do what's upstream. That's what's in your water.

I saw that the water is treated for bacteria but nowhere did I see mention of any treatment/filtration for the chemicals that they can't test for. What's in the water? Frankly, I don't know, and neither does your water supplier, but they still assure you that it's safe.

They've got to be doing at least basic water treatment for turbidity and filtration, but they don't say exactly what they do.I checked their site, and it's the typical 'net site for public consumption, with no real information.

Their chlorination treatment alone produces hundreds of by product chemicals and they admit that they only test for a handful. I'm not trying to scare you, and your water may not be causing your skin problems. But it also might be.

Someone suggested a Brita filter. That could be an inexpensive way to test better filtered water on your skin. I also think I'd carbon filter all of the water I was consuming from your supposedly safe tap water.

Copy and paste into google some of the chemicals your water supplier monitors for. Some have an average ND (not detectable) result shown on the report, then the rate they detected is the next column. I remember one of those chemicals being at 0-3.7. So the composite sample shows nothing but at least one source showed the chemical. Where is your water coming from? Do all of the water sources come together into a tank, get mixed together, treated and piped out? Or is some water treated at the source and piped directly to you? It doesn't say.

FWIW, your water supply is probably no worse than anyone elses in most suburban and urban USA settings. I'm not saying that's good or bad, it just is.

When we lived in NJ the town upriver had their discharge approx. 100 yards upstream from my towns intake. Each town had the same basic setup. Each upstream town treated waste water, then dumped the effluent, and every downstream town treated it and drank it. We had some wells also, same as your water report says you have.

BTW, we got out of dodge. That was just one of the reasons. It just didn't make sense for good health that pharmacuticals, Chemo, industrial waste, and whatever, got discharged, then treated and consumed and health won't suffer. Lots of the chemicals in treated wastewater aren't captured at all, but just pass through to be chlorinated and consumed downstream. If the first chemical wasn't bad enough, the chlorine treatment morphs a certain percentage of those chemicals into new chemicals.

For now I think the experiment of using distilled water is a good first step. See what happens. If it fails you'll know at least one thing... That distilled water doesn't help.

thanks for continuing to look into this.

question, is water that passes through a reverse osmosis system the same as distilled water?

I buy distilled water, but it dawned on me that I probably don't need to buy distilled water since I have a reverse osmosis system installed on my kitchen sink water supply line.

No. They are different.

http://www.freedrinkingwater.com/water-e...method.htm

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