12-01-2012, 11:40 AM
#1
  • gijames
  • Mile High Soldier
  • TN, USA
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oh wonderful sages of the straight,
How do you fix leather strop nicks? Huh

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 12-01-2012, 11:47 AM
#2
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How bad is the nick? I've found most can be sanded out with a fine sandpaper.

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 12-01-2012, 12:13 PM
#3
  • gijames
  • Mile High Soldier
  • TN, USA
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(12-01-2012, 11:47 AM)DrColossus11 Wrote: How bad is the nick? I've found most can be sanded out with a fine sandpaper.

hey Jay!
Welcome to the Nook Smile

like what would be defined as fine-grit, for what you have used?

and here are some pics of two different strops that need some love-fixin
       
       

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 12-01-2012, 12:40 PM
#4
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You glue down any flaps. Then sand the area down so the leather is level-ish again. Neatsfoot oil helps to rehydrate the leather.

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 12-01-2012, 01:07 PM
#5
  • DoubleB
  • Active Member
  • Zeeland, The Netherlands
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What Lee said.

About sandpaper; get to an autoparts shop and try to find grit 2000, 1200, 1000, 600.
Start at the highest grit, if that doesnt work go a grit down and so on until you've found the right grit. Then move back up the grits to smooth out the leather.

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 12-01-2012, 01:21 PM
#6
  • Kavik79
  • Active Member
  • Albany, NY - USA
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Ouch. A couple of those look pretty bad Sad

You'll have to first cut off the flaps that are hanging. If they were deeper into the leather some people might glue them back in place, but they look to me to be fairly shallow slices.
Try to cut them in a way that it makes a smooth slope in and out of the groove like this \_____/ Don't just cut it straight off leaving the smooth slop where the accidental cut happened and a straight chopped cliff on the other side like this \_____|
(I hope that makes sense, it's hard to draw it in text and I'm too lazy today to open up Paint lol)

Once all the loose stuff is removed, I would use something in the 800-1000 grit range. If it's shallow enough you can continue smoothing out all edges of the cut until the transition is so smooth that you can't feel it. If it's too deep to do that, just clean up the edges and leave it be. If you're keeping your whole spine flat on the strop like you should, there's no reason it will fall into the groove as long as nothing is sticking up that will cause it to catch.



And a couple quick words on avoiding nicks like that for anyone reading (don't take this personally, we all end up with strops that look like that at some point lol)

1) Slow down. Some of those look like your arm was still traveling in one direction while you had already flipped the razor to go the other way (particularly the one big one on the red strop, at a slower speed that cut could've been stopped before it got that big). Eventually speed will come naturally, but take your time and think about every single movement on every single lap, until you build the muscle memory to do it right without thinking about it....that's the point you want to get at before you even start to think about going faster.

2) Don't go too close to the ends. Obviously you want to avoid flipping the razor down onto the metal at the top or the handle at the bottom, but if you start to get close and instinctually you stop suddenly (or worse, pull back away from the metal), you'll get lots of little shallow nicks in that area. And if you come to far down and bump the spine into the thicker leather on the handle, the same thing will happen there (that was always a big one for me while I was learning)
3) Make sure the razor is moving before the edge touches the leather AND still moving after you lift it off. Put your spine down on it and start the stropping motion, from this point on do not remove the spine from the leather until you are done. Begin the stropping motion and after an inch or so rotate the razor so the blade makes contact while you're moving. When you reach the other end, rotate so that the edge lifts off and the spine continues on for another inch or so before you stop. Pause and change directions while only the spine is touching the strop, and don't lower the edge back to the leather until you're comfortably moving in the right direction.
A lot of little tiny horizontal cuts happen when you lay the razor flat on the leather, then go to start moving it, and your hand moves slightly perpendicular to the strop before moving parallel to it.

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 12-01-2012, 02:08 PM
#7
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+1 to what Kavik79 said.

Plus some very good pointers......although I've never nicked a strop,,,,,Blush

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 12-01-2012, 02:41 PM
#8
  • Kavik79
  • Active Member
  • Albany, NY - USA
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yeah, well....we've all seen what your first attempts at doing things turn out like. Us mere mortals have more challenges to overcome Tongue

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 12-01-2012, 02:47 PM
#9
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Ha,,! You didn't notice the little blushing face? Hey, it's a rite of passage.
Ever hear of the HHT?
Well I substituted the HST,,,, hanging strop test.

Why settle , I thought , with only one strop when two were just a moment away. OK,, they're short,, but.


Now,, nicks on my face,, nope, never done that either,,,,

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 12-01-2012, 05:24 PM
#10
  • gijames
  • Mile High Soldier
  • TN, USA
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Thanks guys! I appreaciate all the comments...

to the glue, is super-glue OK? or is there a particular *leather* glue that I should use?

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 12-01-2012, 06:21 PM
#11
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Super glue will leave a hard as a rock strip in the leather. I prefer a contact bond cement,, like a rubber cement where you apply some to each section, let it "dry" and then press them together. It stays pliable.
I'm sure others may have other suggestions.

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 12-03-2012, 08:15 AM
#12
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I've used Elmers glue to fix mine. I squeezed any excess out the side and rubbed it smooth with no issues.

I would also recommend a leather glue. Most actually bond the leather back together without leaving a hard spot like superglue would.

http://www.joann.com/aleene-s-leather-glue-/prd1781/

http://www.amazon.com/Tear-Mender-Instan...B001RQCTUU

http://www.tandyleatherfactory.com/en-us...-Glue.aspx

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 12-03-2012, 01:13 PM
#13
  • Batmang
  • Unregistered
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What do you guys think of using a pumice stone on those non-hanging flap nicks?

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 12-03-2012, 01:36 PM
#14
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(12-03-2012, 01:13 PM)Batmang Wrote: What do you guys think of using a pumice stone on those non-hanging flap nicks?

Not terribly dissimilar from sandpaper.

Personally I just leave them if they don't affect the glide. Sand down the rough edges if they do.

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 12-07-2012, 05:48 PM
#15
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I use a piece of 400-600 grit sandpaper.

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