12-09-2012, 09:05 PM
#1
  • gijames
  • Mile High Soldier
  • TN, USA
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Hey wise sages of the SR!

What are the benefits (besides unique looks) of Damascus SRs?

Cons?

I ask because I am considering a future purchase of a *modern* Kamisori (hollow grind) razor, made from Damascus steel. Smile

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 12-09-2012, 09:08 PM
#2
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Benefits: they look amazing.

Cons: if the artisan missed a weld, it would be catastrophic. However, since we're not doing any high impact stuff, I doubt even that would affect anything.

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 12-09-2012, 09:15 PM
#3
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James, i can not wait to see it!
Just as Lee stated, beautiful to behold!

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 12-11-2012, 08:29 PM
#4
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The simple answer is: there's no great benefit to a pattern welded steel razors. 99% of the time it is simply the look of the steel.
In some cases you have razors made in a san mai style. Three layers. Typically softer steel makes up the damascus outer layer and a solid steel core. Depending on the steel used for the core, some of them can make for really great shavers. As good as anything out there.

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 12-11-2012, 10:56 PM
#5
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Don't want to be argumentative, but with knives, there isn't any performance benefit to san mai construction. They don't face any impact, whereas a sword is constantly impacted and stressed.

Even then, I have my doubts as to whether san mai construction actually imparts greater impact resistance or if it was just a cost saving measure. Middle Eastern swords performed just fine without san mai construction. But that's a different topic.

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 12-12-2012, 06:06 AM
#6
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Lee,
I don't know a ton about knives, so whether san mai construction in knifes is a benefit.. I have no idea.
But as it pertains to razors.... in some cases it does have benefits. Example: Type of core steel. In the 3 layer san mai construction you have the ability to use a thinner steel. That being the case,it opens up a couple a possibilities that you typically don't have in 1/4" thickness. One of those been the Japanese carbon steel. Another would be some of the Swedish steel.

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 12-12-2012, 06:44 AM
#7
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I would say the only true benefit would be in the looks department, as for steel Rockstead knives without doubt offer a unreal level of performance no other manufacture can get close to, I have quite a few Japanese knives, this one is one of my favourites, a 36 layer clad Damascus one of 80 pieces made, and a little video showing you exactly what a Rockstead knife can do.

Jamie.

[Image: McustaLMC004.jpg]
[Image: McustaLMC001.jpg]
[Image: McustaLMC002.jpg]




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 12-12-2012, 02:27 PM
#8
  • gijames
  • Mile High Soldier
  • TN, USA
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wow Jamie! thank you for sharing your pics and the video Cool

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 12-12-2012, 02:37 PM
#9
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(12-12-2012, 06:06 AM)MileMarker60 Wrote: Lee,
I don't know a ton about knives, so whether san mai construction in knifes is a benefit.. I have no idea.
But as it pertains to razors.... in some cases it does have benefits. Example: Type of core steel. In the 3 layer san mai construction you have the ability to use a thinner steel. That being the case,it opens up a couple a possibilities that you typically don't have in 1/4" thickness. One of those been the Japanese carbon steel. Another would be some of the Swedish steel.

Brian,
I admit that I don't know everything. Please explain further.

I'm having difficulty seeing the performance benefit. The sides will still be there. So, what is the drawback from making the entire piece out of the thinner steel? Unless you're saying that you can't get the thinner steel in thicker stock.

Maybe I'm using the wrong words. By performance, I mean cutting or maneuverability. That said, I actually don't know if san mai is lighter.

Wow, I want one!

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 12-12-2012, 03:41 PM
#10
  • Kavik79
  • Active Member
  • Albany, NY - USA
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Is anyone else here wondering if the softer steel on the outer layers would wear faster while honing, eventually throwing of the bevel angle?

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 12-12-2012, 04:13 PM
#11
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(12-12-2012, 03:41 PM)Kavik79 Wrote: Is anyone else here wondering if the softer steel on the outer layers would wear faster while honing, eventually throwing of the bevel angle?

Pattern welded construction is made from a single billet. The entire steel is the same.

San Mai construction which Brian refers to is a hard steel core surrounded on two sides by a softer steel. It does not have to be pattern welded, but normally is. The purported advantage of such construction is you get the best of both worlds: hard edge + shock absorbing softer steel. No one has actually tested/proved this AFAIK. A sword will kill you all the same whether it's made from a single steel or 3 layered.

When referring to damascus, it refers to the pattern brought out and revealed through etching. It's technical name is pattern welded steel, but everyone calls it Damascus.

Razors made from Damascus are from a single billet unless otherwise specified. So, no, it won't wear out faster.

But if it was made from San Mai construction, it would.

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 12-14-2012, 08:25 PM
#12
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However made it's the best looking stuff ever.

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 12-20-2012, 02:03 PM
#13
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(12-12-2012, 02:37 PM)asharperrazor Wrote:
(12-12-2012, 06:06 AM)MileMarker60 Wrote: Lee,
I don't know a ton about knives, so whether san mai construction in knifes is a benefit.. I have no idea.
But as it pertains to razors.... in some cases it does have benefits. Example: Type of core steel. In the 3 layer san mai construction you have the ability to use a thinner steel. That being the case,it opens up a couple a possibilities that you typically don't have in 1/4" thickness. One of those been the Japanese carbon steel. Another would be some of the Swedish steel.

Brian,
I admit that I don't know everything. Please explain further.

I'm having difficulty seeing the performance benefit. The sides will still be there. So, what is the drawback from making the entire piece out of the thinner steel? Unless you're saying that you can't get the thinner steel in thicker stock.

Maybe I'm using the wrong words. By performance, I mean cutting or maneuverability. That said, I actually don't know if san mai is lighter.

Wow, I want one!

"Unless you're saying that you can't get the thinner steel in thicker stock."
That is what I'm saying. There are a few steels that just aren't very common/available in thicker stock.

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