03-26-2012, 07:40 AM
#1
  • Songwind
  • Soap Slinger & Scuttle Pusher
  • Burnsville, MN
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First off, I am relatively inexperienced with creams. I have Kiss My Face Cool Mint and TOBS Lemon & Lime. I tend to reach for the soaps first.

The last few times I've used a cream, I've gotten a lot of lather, and it looked good, but on my face it didn't really seem to offer any protection from the blade. I ended up with worse razor burn and more weepers and nicks than when using a soap.

Any idea how to bring out the protective aspects of creams? Suggestions on what I may be missing?

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 03-26-2012, 08:07 AM
#2
  • Teiste
  • Moderator Emeritus
  • Salt Lake City,UT
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It could be the lather that you are making or just that the creams being used dont work for you.
I have tried the Kiss My Face Lavender with good results and its an slick cream for me.However I find that soaps treats my skin much better than creams,but there are some creams out there which performs really well,like Tabula Rasa,Acca Kappa (the tub one),Speick,Florena,Edwin Jagger/Muhle creams,Nivea...

I guess its a question of trying and just see which one gives you better skin protection.

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 03-26-2012, 08:17 AM
#3
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Don't judge lather from creams by it's volume. Look carefully at the texture of it. It should have a fine, dense structure and a kind of pearlescent sheen to it. Also, if possible, try to pay attention to the weight of your brush before and after making your lather. The telltale sign for me is when the brush feels weighed down with a "heavy" lather. It is harder to feel on the heavier handle brushes, but it indicates a well hydrated lather. Remember, the purpose is to hold moisture against your face to both soften the whisker and lubricate and hydrate the skin. A light weight lather can have lots of volume, and appear opaque and thick, but it won't protect you very well. Keep trying, and when practicing or making test lathers, take longer mixing than you think you really need to. Also, don't make violent whipping motions, which add too much air to the lather. Keep it subtle and I think you will really notice a difference. It's easy to add water little by little to a dry lather, but it is really hard to get a lather going when you start with too much water.

I hope this helps.

My favorite creams in descending order are Trumpers GFT, Cyril Salter, Speick and La Toja. Kiss my Face is good, but be generous with the product.

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 03-26-2012, 08:40 AM
#4
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I agree with Dirty Texan in almost everything he wrote, except for the brush weight and balance test. Doing this without the adequate judgment could also get you an overdried lather if you use too much cream.
So, as for many other things in life, keep trying and getting wrong, and you’ll find the right merengue lather.
I use both soaps and creams (of course I have the luck of the easy availability of the fine Portuguese creams BiggrinTongue ) and with soaps I always start with a little less water in the brush than I do with creams. And for these always use a badger brush. Maybe this can help you

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 03-26-2012, 09:00 AM
#5
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(03-26-2012, 08:40 AM)Almaminha Wrote: I agree with Dirty Texan in almost everything he wrote, except for the brush weight and balance test. Doing this without the adequate judgment could also get you an overdried lather if you use too much cream.
So, as for many other things in life, keep trying and getting wrong, and you’ll find the right merengue lather.
I use both soaps and creams (of course I have the luck of the easy availability of the fine Portuguese creams BiggrinTongue ) and with soaps I always start with a little less water in the brush than I do with creams. And for these always use a badger brush. Maybe this can help you

Thanks for the input. I assumed a fixed amount of cream, whether it be squeezed from a tube or swirled from a pot. The weight change would then be a product of adding adequate water to completely hydrate the cream so that it feels heavy in relation to its volume.

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 03-26-2012, 08:23 PM
#6
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I feel creams can make some really dense lathers and be super slick. They usually have high concentrations of stearic acid which is used as a lubricant.

One mistake I do find myself making, since I use soaps so much more, is over hydrating them or using too wet a brush when I face lather. When I use them consistently and get my technique back, I can get some of the best shaves ever from them.

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 03-26-2012, 08:41 PM
#7
  • Songwind
  • Soap Slinger & Scuttle Pusher
  • Burnsville, MN
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I'll start out with a wetter brush and see how that goes. Thanks, everyone.

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 03-26-2012, 09:52 PM
#8
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Just choose a quantity of cream, but it's meaningless. It can be adjusted if one doesn't commit to an amount of water up front.

Well, I start with a not wet brush (shaken off) and spread the cream first, and build up the paste, then add water as I work it in. I never use a wet (dripping or even fully water loaded) brush to start. With some brushes that's far too much water. You can always add more water or cream, it's hard to remove water. Start slowly, build slowly. Try to do it all in one step and it's fast if it works, and if it doesn't you have a problem. Making slow steps is far more reliable and will yield a better lather more frequently. Like 99.99% of the time.

If one has too much water at the start you can probably fix that if you have patience, but it was lack of patience that got one there, so it's doubtful. With too much water you need to add more cream early on. I use more than I need to begin and know that I'm using too much and live with that knowledge, too much works every time. It just uses a little more water and yields enough lather for plenty of passes or other uses.

I face lather and it's pretty easy to gauge what's happning with the lather when it's on the face.

As already written the right lather will be satiny in look, with microscopic bubbles. It'll also be slicker than snot, and will offer some resistence to pressure when put between two surafces that want to move together, think fingertips for a test.

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 03-27-2012, 09:43 AM
#9
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Of all the creams I have tried, Cella is very slick, and does not easily dry out. I think. Acca Kappa 1869 (tub) is very similar. Neither is very expensive.

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 03-27-2012, 01:56 PM
#10
  • Songwind
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  • Burnsville, MN
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(03-27-2012, 09:43 AM)Bowlturner Wrote: Of all the creams I have tried, Cella is very slick, and does not easily dry out. I think. Acca Kappa 1869 (tub) is very similar. Neither is very expensive.

I don't have trouble with the Italian "bowl" creams. It's the English style tub that's giving me problems. RazoRock XXX is probably the slickest thing I currently own.

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 03-27-2012, 02:23 PM
#11
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(03-27-2012, 01:56 PM)Songwind Wrote:
(03-27-2012, 09:43 AM)Bowlturner Wrote: Of all the creams I have tried, Cella is very slick, and does not easily dry out. I think. Acca Kappa 1869 (tub) is very similar. Neither is very expensive.

I don't have trouble with the Italian "bowl" creams. It's the English style tub that's giving me problems. RazoRock XXX is probably the slickest thing I currently own.

Then you're not alone! The "English style" creams, as you call them, have more water to product sensitivity, at least for me. I tend to let those creams lather up a bit wet and runny because I can expect it to get a bit stiff durning the last pass. Once it starts to get stiff it does not seem to lubricate at all and I am just scraping cream of my face. If necessary I add several drops of water to the brush when I see this start to happen and keep the lather moist

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 03-27-2012, 02:34 PM
#12
  • Brent
  • Active Member
  • Columbus, OH
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I use a straight and I don't seem to have a problem with creams. I agree with the above it's probably your water/cream ratio. Sometimes what I do with a new cream is test lather by adding more and more water, keeping track, until it breaks down. Then I back up a few steps the next time to where it seemed fine and use it.

I think every cream/soap is different so experimentation on all helps.

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 03-28-2012, 07:34 AM
#13
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I'm currently using up some Trumper samples I've had now for at least 6 months. When I first got them I thought they were pretty good, but now I find that they are lacking in the "fat", "tallow", whatever it is that makes good soap kind to the skin.

Maybe that's what you're experiencing?

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