12-29-2012, 10:51 AM
#1
  • Teiste
  • Moderator Emeritus
  • Salt Lake City,UT
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And dont get me wrong , I truly like using badger , synthetic , mixed hair brushes , and I will keep using them and enjoy them too , but there is something about boar...

I can spend a long period of time using badger hair brushes only , and when I go back to use boar , I always find myself saying : "this is it".And I don't know how to express the "this is it" thing or factor , since there are different types of boar hairs , which behave different from each other (is not the same an Omega boar brushes than Semogue , even a 75% tops than a 90% premium tops) but I like them all , something I cant say about the different badger hair grades.

I truly dont know what is it about boar brushes which always hit the spot for me (unless the cr*ppy ones out there) but I'm definitely a boar guy.And the good thing is , you don't need to spend a lot of money on a good quality boar brush , unlike badger or even , synthetic : the boar brush is more "democratic" in that way , being capable to provide an excellent service to all , both rich and not so rich.

And regarding the luxurious feeling that some gentlemen find on the badger brushes : I do find the same on boar brushes.I shave today with a Semogue 820 , and man , that was luxurious for me : extra soft tips , like some of the silvertip badger brushes out there , with plenty of backbone, flow and density of hair.What else can I ask for?

Looking forward to increase my collection of boar brushes.Biggrin I cant get enough of them.

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 12-29-2012, 10:54 AM
#2
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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That's why I own 15 boar and 1 badger.Smile

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 12-29-2012, 11:16 AM
#3
  • MikekiM
  • Senior Member
  • Long Island, NY
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Totally agree with both of you gentlemen.

Boars outweigh badger in my inventory as well. The SoC is probably my favorite with the 2011 Semogue LE second and the Semogue B&B 2010 Custom right behind them. I need to add some Omega's.

If I could put words to a comparison, Badger is luxury. Boar has an element of luxury, but a bias towards the utilitarian. In addition, there is something about the fact that the boar needs to be soaked..can't quite put my finger on it.

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 12-29-2012, 11:23 AM
#4
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While badger outnumbers the boar brushes in my rotation, I must say I cannot imagine not having the SOC, 1305 (or Tricolor LE) and my Omega Pro 20102 in my permanent rotation. Great performers all. And let's not forget the great Semogue boar / badger mixes as I have (or will) have 3 in the rotation.

Sadly what boar has done for me is move me away from standard silvertip badgers to the more expensive firmer badgers like manchrian, EW (haven't yet tried HMW), and D01.

Stupid shaving forums always expanding my horizons.Biggrin

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 12-29-2012, 11:37 AM
#5
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I have my TSN LE Semogue, my 820 and my Vulfix Grosvenor. Love them. I would kill to get the new SE SOC, but affording it this time of year is rough. Between Christmas and the kid's birthday in the middle of January, no money for me...Either way, love me my boars. If I did go badger, it would be finest...but for now I'm happy with mine...

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 12-29-2012, 11:45 AM
#6
  • DLP
  • Active Member
  • Missouri
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I've got a couple of boars and a mixed but I still prefer my Horse Hair or Badger brushes.

Of course we are talking about Traditional Wet Shaving where just about everything is YMMV.

Biggrin

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 12-29-2012, 12:33 PM
#7
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i also felt the same way, but then started realizing that i was getting brush burn with the boars on the second and third passes! i thought it was my razors and technique, but once i got my Rooneys, i have slowly given up boars. Probably, not for good, but i almost exclusively use the soft badgers. However, i still think boars are excellent brushes for the price and performance and the good ones are made in Portugal, to boot! Hee hee.
Enjoy your boars, gents!

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 12-29-2012, 12:43 PM
#8
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I have yet to try a badger brush and don't know if I want too. I have 4 boars and a 5th on the way. Living in AZ with extremely hard water, I'm not sure I'd enjoy a badger.


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 12-29-2012, 12:54 PM
#9
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(12-29-2012, 12:43 PM)xCarbonSteelx Wrote: I have yet to try a badger brush and don't know if I want too. I have 4 boars and a 5th on the way. Living in AZ with extremely hard water, I'm not sure I'd enjoy a badger.


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It really depends on the badger to be honest. Soft floppy badgers probably will be worse for you than some of the denser / firmer brushes. Of course, that drives up the cost.

My suggestion if you are ever in the mood to try a good badger which would deal well in your area would be to try the SOC 2-band badger. Decent price and a heck of a great knot.

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 12-29-2012, 01:09 PM
#10
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(12-29-2012, 12:54 PM)wingdo Wrote: My suggestion if you are ever in the mood to try a good badger which would deal well in your area would be to try the SOC 2-band badger. Decent price and a heck of a great knot.

I'll keep that in mind. I'm planning on getting some new gear when I get my tax return in 2013.



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 12-29-2012, 01:24 PM
#11
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I use my brushes (mostly) in the order they are in my shave cabinet, and they are segregated. Boars are to the left, badgers to the right, I have no idea where the synthetics will wind up. But anyway, using one a day (left to right, just like reading) I go through the same "Ahh, here again!" feeling everytime I shift from boar to badger and badger to boar. I like them all and those I didn't like (few) I either gave away or sold.

I guess I'm just a brush guy, but I sure do like my boars when it's their turn in the rotation. Oh, I just counted; I have exactly 9 boars and 9 badgers that was never planned it just happened, 2 boars are in storage however for someone, someday.

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 12-30-2012, 06:13 AM
#12
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Owned 3 boar brushes, 2 Omega's and an EJ boar brush, tried one of the Omega's gifted away the other, tried the EJ brush but never got along or felt the love as I do with badger.

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 12-30-2012, 06:19 AM
#13
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I really liked my Semogue 2000 enough that I even bought a back up. I used it exclusively for close to a year. It was super soft, but not quite floppy and I had my technique dialed in with it. Unfortunately, the knot disintegrated and I had to break out the back up. A broken in boar is a wonderful thing, but a new one not so much.

I still have the back up but haven't looked at it in the better part of a year as I have been hooked on an Oscar11 handle with a 24mm TGN Finest. I might have to revisit it soon as it was a nice brush.

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 12-30-2012, 08:02 AM
#14
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I really wanted to like boar brushes. I tried a bunch back when Zach was active on SMF. I actually really liked the face feel, but they just fell short in the lathered department. I had no problem making a good lather for the first pass, but boar brushes have a tendency to "eat" lather, so by the time I got to the third pass, it was too thin. Badger or synthetic for me.

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 12-30-2012, 03:27 PM
#15
  • Howler
  • A calamophile and vintage razor lover
  • Fort Smith AR
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Boar brushes are the staple of my Nook. My Shavemac Silvertip, is a special brush for me, does an outstanding job. As the boars mature they are becoming softer.

I'm looking forward to adding additional boars for my Nook.

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 12-30-2012, 04:49 PM
#16
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I have a cheap Vulfix boar and an even cheaper Omega boar and they get way more use than my really nice Simpsons Special Badger. What can I say- I like the scritch. Cool

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 12-30-2012, 06:19 PM
#17
  • MikekiM
  • Senior Member
  • Long Island, NY
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@ Aaron..

In my shave world, I have found the following to be a rule.. When a boar is done releasing its lather, it is REALLY done. I can't coax any additional lather out of the knot (unlike nearly every badger that I have owned, all of which offer a nice glob of extra thick lather with a gentle squeeze of the knot, even if it appeared to be lather free).

Just for frame of reference....
http://www.shavenook.com/showthread.php?tid=8979

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 12-30-2012, 06:46 PM
#18
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(12-30-2012, 06:19 PM)MikekiM Wrote: @ Aaron..

In my shave world, I have found the following to be a rule.. When a boar is done releasing its lather, it is REALLY done. I can't coax any additional lather out of the knot (unlike nearly every badger that I have owned, all of which offer a nice glob of extra thick lather with a gentle squeeze of the knot, even if it appeared to be lather free).

Just for frame of reference....
http://www.shavenook.com/showthread.php?tid=8979

Boar is for me!!!

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 12-30-2012, 09:50 PM
#19
  • CMur12
  • Semogueiro de Coração
  • Moses Lake, Washington State, USA
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My personal suspicion is that face-lathering as we know it on these forums was developed with boar brushes.

Most of the vintage badger brushes I have seen are pretty soft and floppy, suggesting to me that they were not used in this manner. With the rise of the middle class and a resurgence of traditional wetshaving, a desire for premium brushes (badger) that could do what boar always could may have been the source of the current trend in badger brushes with backbone(?).

- Murray

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 12-30-2012, 10:00 PM
#20
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(12-30-2012, 09:50 PM)CMur12 Wrote: My personal suspicion is that face-lathering as we know it on these forums was developed with boar brushes.

Most of the vintage badger brushes I have seen are pretty soft and floppy, suggesting to me that they were not used in this manner. With the rise of the middle class and a resurgence of traditional wetshaving, a desire for premium brushes (badger) that could do what boar always could may have been the source of the current trend in badger brushes with backbone(?).

- Murray

Then again, Simpsons has been making the Chubby for a good part of the 20th century, and it's anything but floppy. All references to lathering in "vintage" times have been about face lathering, which leads me to suspect that bowl lathering is a new-ish phenomenon.

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