01-04-2013, 02:21 PM
#1
  • vferdman
  • Artisan
  • Western Massachusetts
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I am a relative newbie in this DE shaving thing. About 9 months or so. But I jumped right in and will never shave with a cartridge again! As most beginners I tried many things and have learned a lot from this and other forums. One thing I learned about boar brushes is that they require a long soak before use. When I use badger brushes I just soak them while I brush my teeth, prep my face and gear and fill the sink with water. About 5-7 minutes at most. I did that with my first boar, Omega 10275, which is an outstanding inexpensive brush, BTW. It worked fine. Then I read up more on boars and got into Semogues (1305 and 1470). Semogues took a long time to break in, especially the 1470. I didn't shave much with them at first, just lathered them. Then I started shaving with them and soaking them for at least 20 minutes. They ate my lather! Especially the 1470. I sold the 1305 because it was too big for me and too floppy. I really liked the short lofted Omega 10275 and really wanted to love the short lofted 1470. But, alas, 1470 kept eating the lather. I stopped using boars for a while (badger addiction kicked in), but really missed them. Then I had a chance to restore a couple of old brush handles and I chose Omega boar knots from TGN. Those are unbanded, unbleached short loft knots that are in many Omega brushes. I broke them in (much easier than Semogue) and used them as I use badgers as far as soaking regiment. They were great! No lather eating. By this time my Semogue 1470 got exiled to a cabinet out of rotation. I just could not make it work for me. Ate lather and left me none to shave with. I almost forgot about it. Recently I bought a very interesting old boar brush because of the handle, but when it arrived I decided to try it since it looked like a very high quality Semogue-like boar knot. After a good thorough washing I shaved with it and again, soaked it for almost an hour (put it to soak and got side-tracked). It ate the lather and left me almost none to shave with. this is when it occurred to me that excessive soaking could be the culprit. Next shave I used the same boar brush, but soaked it like I would a badger, 5-7 minutes max. What a shave! The brush performed so well I decided to not re-knot it and possibly it may become my daily driver! Now that I had the idea of too much soaking being bad for boar brush performance, I dug out the Semogue 1470 which I could never get a good shave with since I bought it. I tried the "normal"/badger soaking regiment and I got one of the best lathers I ever had with any brush! So there you have it, gentlemen, my almost scientific discovery. Do not soak your boar for more than 5-7 minutes or it will become a lather eater. If you have a boar that is a lather eater, pay attention to how you soak it. If it soaks for too long before lathering, try a shorter time. Just enough to soften up the bristles and then lather it and shave. I hope some of the lather eating boars out there will get a new lease on life now.



However for boars I soak them for at least 15 minutes before I start the prep routine, so they end up soaking for at least 20 minutes.

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 01-04-2013, 02:36 PM
#2
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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I soak all my boars, Semogue, Vulfix, and Omega between 10-20 minutes in warm tap water before I start to lather. Been doing that for at least 40-years.

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 01-04-2013, 02:38 PM
#3
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I don't soak my boars at all. I just hold them under running water while filling the sink.

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 01-04-2013, 03:08 PM
#4
  • vferdman
  • Artisan
  • Western Massachusetts
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(01-04-2013, 02:36 PM)Johnny Wrote: I soak all my boars, Semogue, Vulfix, and Omega between 10-20 minutes in warm tap water before I start to lather. Been doing that for at least 40-years.

Johnny, I know you are a fan of Semogue 1460, which is the same as my 1470 with a painted handle. I could not for the life of me make that brush work until I quit soaking it for so long. I would just end up with enough lather for one pass and even that would be skimpy. The second pass I would have to go back to the soap or just another brush. This morning I used the 1470 and soaked it the normal amount for me, which is about 5 minutes and it performed amazingly well. 3 passes, touch-up and left over enough to wash alum off with at the end. This is the first time that 1470 produced this kind of result. As I said, I had it stuffed into a cabinet until this morning when I realized that soaking boars for too long is not great. Have you tried soaking your boars for less? Would you consider trying it for the sake of this thread and science? Perhaps it matters what kind of water is used? I have medium soft water. Nothing like in Boston, where the water is the softest I have tried. Here the water is not very hard, but not super soft either.

(01-04-2013, 02:38 PM)PanChango Wrote: I don't soak my boars at all. I just hold them under running water while filling the sink.

Wow! That's interesting. I usually just drop mine into a cup of water while I do my prep. So how do your un-soaked boars perform?

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 01-04-2013, 03:13 PM
#5
  • MikekiM
  • Senior Member
  • Long Island, NY
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I soak both boar and badger for what-ever time it takes to shower and dry off.

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 01-04-2013, 03:21 PM
#6
  • vferdman
  • Artisan
  • Western Massachusetts
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That's great info, everyone, but could you please include whether or not your boars tend to "eat" lather. I have a couple Omega boar knots stuffed into vintage handles and they do not eat lather at all, but I have not been soaking them too long. I read threads where people soak their boars for 30 minutes. Not sure if that correlates to lather eating or not. I have a limited number of data points that suggest soaking too long makes boars eat lather.

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 01-04-2013, 03:33 PM
#7
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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For the sake os science I will do a short soak for tomorrows shave and report back.

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 01-04-2013, 03:47 PM
#8
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Well, I have always used boars... I wake up early in the morning, and I could not wait 30 minutes for soaking if I wanted to... so, I soak them for 5 minutes or so, 10 minutes maximum, and they always perform well for me...

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 01-04-2013, 03:53 PM
#9
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(01-04-2013, 03:21 PM)vferdman Wrote: That's great info, everyone, but could you please include whether or not your boars tend to "eat" lather. I have a couple Omega boar knots stuffed into vintage handles and they do not eat lather at all, but I have not been soaking them too long. I read threads where people soak their boars for 30 minutes. Not sure if that correlates to lather eating or not. I have a limited number of data points that suggest soaking too long makes boars eat lather.

I have soaked them in the past, but it has been too long for me to remember. I have 2 Semogue boars (SOC and 2000) and neither of them seem to eat lather. They actually release it much more so than my other brushes.

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 01-04-2013, 04:18 PM
#10
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I got rid of ally boars due to the soaking time in the morning & mine used to eat lather all the time. When I get bored of my badgers I'll pick up another boar or two & try less soaking. Makeshift wish I still had one around to try this out and report back on. Very interesting theory none the less.

Thanks!

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 01-04-2013, 04:41 PM
#11
  • ben74
  • Administrator
  • Perth, Australia
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I only have a badger/boar mix. I let this soak for up to 5 minutes maximum, while I shower. More often it only soaks for a couple of minutes. I figure once it's wet it's wet and surely must reach a point after a few minutes where it's not possible to absorb/holder anymore water?

My badger only brushes would be lucky to get 30 seconds under the tap...

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 01-04-2013, 06:24 PM
#12
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When i was using boar, daily, i would just run it under the tab of cold water for 10 seconds or so and go at the soap. i never had much of an issue and i didn't need to wait to start shaving. Hee hee. With all this talk of boars, i may get my 830 out for a shave to reminisce. Biggrin

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 01-04-2013, 06:56 PM
#13
  • vferdman
  • Artisan
  • Western Massachusetts
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(01-04-2013, 03:33 PM)Johnny Wrote: For the sake os science I will do a short soak for tomorrows shave and report back.

Johnny, glad to hear you are willing to support this experiment. It's just that I tried to sell the 1470 several times, but since it's a "low end" Semogue it didn't really go anywhere. However I always liked its looks and the way it felt on the face. Really wanted to make it work, but insisted on soaking it for some reason. Now that I stumbled on its secret (one shave only so far) I am so happy to have what amounts to a new (to me) boar. I've been using Omega boars with great pleasure. I restored two handles with Omega boar knots from TGN and absolutely love those brushes. They are also 50mm loft, but Omega boars are very different from Semogue. Both are fantastic, but each with a unique look and feel. Now I need to get another Semogue boar. Perhaps a 1438, which has different bristles than the 1470 and still is set at 50mm.

(01-04-2013, 04:18 PM)SharpSpine Wrote: I got rid of ally boars due to the soaking time in the morning & mine used to eat lather all the time. When I get bored of my badgers I'll pick up another boar or two & try less soaking. Makeshift wish I still had one around to try this out and report back on. Very interesting theory none the less.

Thanks!

Well, next time you stumble on a boar give it a shot with the same soaking regiment you use with your badger. Badger does not really need to be soaked at all, just get it wet under running water and you are ready to go. I think boar does benefit from a short soak. a few minutes, but nothing like a half hour. Most people who are constant boar users are doing just that or less, I finding out. that's great news. Boar brushes are very interesting and inexpensive.

(01-04-2013, 06:24 PM)celestino Wrote: When i was using boar, daily, i would just run it under the tab of cold water for 10 seconds or so and go at the soap. i never had much of an issue and i didn't need to wait to start shaving. Hee hee. With all this talk of boars, i may get my 830 out for a shave to reminisce. Biggrin

Wow! 10 seconds. I never even tried that. My routine is to brush teeth and prep face while the brush is soaking. I find that works for just about any brush I have. Now including the Semogue. But your point is well taken. No need to super soak the boars. If you have a lather eater boar, check the soaking time. Perhaps you are over soaking it.

Celestino, if you are not using your 830 I could trade you something for it. PM me if you want. I always wanted to try the 830, but bought the 1305 instead. Didn't care too much for it. Too floppy and too big for me. 830 is supposed to be a bit more dense. I really liked the bristles and the handle on the 1305, though. Acrylic handles are way cool looking.

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 01-04-2013, 07:13 PM
#14
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Sorry, man, it's for my 12-year-old son. Biggrin

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 01-04-2013, 08:24 PM
#15
  • vferdman
  • Artisan
  • Western Massachusetts
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(01-04-2013, 07:13 PM)celestino Wrote: Sorry, man, it's for my 12-year-old son. Biggrin

Really? A young shaver or are you going to save it for when he starts? I gave my 16 year old a Wee Scot as a starter and a Ball End Tech and a stick of Arko. He uses the stuff about twice a week or less often, even. Loves it, but not like we do. For him it's just a good no-nonsense irritation-free, inexpensive way to shave. He doesn't even know what a cartridge looks like close up out of a package Smile

Alright, keep the 830 for your son. He will thank you for it, I am sure.

I was going to offer you one of my restores I did with Omega boar knots. This or this. Both amazing boars and pretty much broken in.

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 01-04-2013, 09:09 PM
#16
  • Songwind
  • Soap Slinger & Scuttle Pusher
  • Burnsville, MN
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I can't say I've ever noticed my boar brushes "eating lather," regardless of how long I soaked them.

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 01-04-2013, 09:53 PM
#17
  • savagejoerude
  • If you ain't a LOSER, you ain't livin'!!
  • New Orleans USA
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I too am a bit confused by the term "eating lather". I can lather with just about everything and get good luxurious creamy lather. I soak my boars from 3 to 30 minutes depending on time constraints. It doesn't seem to matter. Soap EXPLODES for me like I was The Amazing Kreskin... Of course I have the luck of using Mighty Mississippi water. I guess you can lather pure lye with that stuff...lol Does this phenomenon happen with different soaps/creams? Are you sure it's the brush? Hope you get it figured out. I would hate to see a nice brush put out to pasture...

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 01-04-2013, 11:27 PM
#18
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I never soak any of my brushes. I wet them fully as the sink is filling, then I up end them to "soak" upside down as the sink fills, or put them on the soap if that particular soap of the day requires it. The brush soaks for maybe a minute or 2 at most.

Then they get shaken off and used.

I'm betting that the eating soap phenominon happens if too little product is used or too much water is in the brush. Try using the old solution of using more product.

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 01-05-2013, 04:57 AM
#19
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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Alright, this morning I used my wife's timer and let my Vulfix Strand Boar soak for exactly 5-minutes in warm tap water. After my normal drip and light shake I started to lather, and I must say I could tell no difference between this mornings lather and the one I made yesterday using my 20-minute soak.

The one thing I did learn though, there is no need in the extra 15+ minutes of soaking, and that's a good thing. Now I can get to my wonderful shave sooner, rather than later.

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 01-05-2013, 05:40 AM
#20
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SavageJoe & SD, this happened to me a lot when I used boars. It could happen with almost any soap/cream and because of my hard water I load every soap a ton, especially since I prefer an UltraLather. I would still get the lather eating phenemon.

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