01-07-2013, 11:57 PM
#1
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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I am considering using egg white as a varnish to cover an old Simpson decal, rather than a mineral varnish or nail varnish. Does anyone have any thoughts/eggsperiences Smile using egg white as a clear varnish? I understand it is waterproof...but I'd like to know if anyone thinks or knows it isn't.

Does the albumen need to be whipped up first? There seems always to be the very runny stuff and the thicker gelatinous stuff.

In answer to my own question, the following:

http://www.fullchisel.com/blog/?p=1553

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 01-08-2013, 10:52 AM
#2
  • Teiste
  • Moderator Emeritus
  • Salt Lake City,UT
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Shaun , I hve never heard something like that , but thanks for the info.

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 01-08-2013, 11:10 AM
#3
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(01-08-2013, 10:52 AM)Teiste Wrote: Shaun , I hve never heard something like that , but thanks for the info.

+1 Never heard this either.

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 01-08-2013, 01:06 PM
#4
  • Songwind
  • Soap Slinger & Scuttle Pusher
  • Burnsville, MN
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I know egg whites have been used as a varnish, but I don't know anything about how to go about it.

I'm pretty sure there are harder, safer, more durable varnishes available. Why do you want to use egg white?

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 01-08-2013, 01:31 PM
#5
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Would it smell?

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 01-08-2013, 02:51 PM
#6
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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(01-08-2013, 01:06 PM)Songwind Wrote: I know egg whites have been used as a varnish, but I don't know anything about how to go about it.

I'm pretty sure there are harder, safer, more durable varnishes available. Why do you want to use egg white?

I want to use it because eggs are just 'there', plus it is a traditional method, and I am interested in traditional methods (like DE shaving and using shaving brushes). Also, as I understand it, 'normal' varnishes can dissolve decals if you're not careful. I just wanted to see if using egg white glair worked and so on. I am going to whip up some egg white as per the link I posted above, and let it stand, then use it the next day. As for smell, I have heard it can be used when it rots a little bit and in this state it is apparently good for applying gold leaf (a signqwriter's technique). With the Simpson decal, there is a gold colour in the decal, and I just had the idea. Plus glair is clear. Worth a try, no?

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 01-08-2013, 05:02 PM
#7
  • Crag
  • Senior Member
  • Menifee, Ca 92586
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Egg Whites by themselves are not waterproof, nor are they used alone as a varnish. I made a bureau for my dad and used egg white in the finish, but I added Gum Arabic and finished it with Tung Oil. It was REALLY LABOR INTENSIVE and I will NEVER do it again. It is a very early American form of Varnish, more like a shellac because the egg white makes it shine, but if you make even one tiny mistake in the application you will have to strip the piece and start all over. I would not recommend it ever to anyone, unless you live under a rock or or a deserted isle... If you google Egg White Varnish you can get more info. Be prepared to rub if you choose to go that route though...

EDIT** I see now that you intend to use it on your brush handle...I do not believe that you can use it in that manner, but google it and let us know...

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 01-08-2013, 06:22 PM
#8
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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(01-08-2013, 05:02 PM)Crag Wrote: Egg Whites by themselves are not waterproof, nor are they used alone as a varnish. I made a bureau for my dad and used egg white in the finish, but I added Gum Arabic and finished it with Tung Oil. It was REALLY LABOR INTENSIVE and I will NEVER do it again. It is a very early American form of Varnish, more like a shellac because the egg white makes it shine, but if you make even one tiny mistake in the application you will have to strip the piece and start all over. I would not recommend it ever to anyone, unless you live under a rock or or a deserted isle... If you google Egg White Varnish you can get more info. Be prepared to rub if you choose to go that route though...

EDIT** I see now that you intend to use it on your brush handle...I do not believe that you can use it in that manner, but google it and let us know...

Hi Crag, thanks for this interesting and useful information.

Did you see the link I posted very early in this thread?

Shaun

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 01-08-2013, 07:10 PM
#9
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Having quite a bit of experience in repairing and restoring antique furniture, it's true. . . .to a point.

I have used egg whites as a sealer, prior to a varnish being applied. The egg whites has a glue-type property, easy to sand, and doesn't leave an uneven build-up. It also prevents stains and paints from bleeding.

A friend of mine makes violins and cellos. He uses an egg white and vinegar mix to coat the inside of the instruments. Enhances/enriches the sound. He also uses an egg white wash before applying the stain.

No experience using egg whites as a varnish or on items other than wood.

I doubt egg whites, as a varnish, would withstand prolonged and repeated contact with water.

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 01-08-2013, 08:46 PM
#10
  • MaxP
  • Senior Member
  • Madison, WI
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I bought a bottle of Testors Dullcote at a hobby shop. Modelers have been using it for decades to protect decals.


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 01-08-2013, 10:56 PM
#11
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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Thanks Max; I just wanted to try the glair method to see if it works, really. I just applied a coat and will let readers know. So far so good. My researches indicated that glair is indeed waterproof. Have you ever had your car pelted with eggs (Yes? Well how come? Smile Well as a kid I remember trying to get the egg white off car paint; nope, wouldn't come off.

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 01-08-2013, 11:09 PM
#12
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My only experience with egg on my car I caught it before the sun came up and cooked the eggs, but all I did was spray the area with water, allow to sit, wipe off, repeat until gone.

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 01-09-2013, 02:40 PM
#13
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You can go to a hobby shop and ask for an acrylic clear varnish. Testors, Tamiya, Mr. Hobby are just some of the brands to look for. If you want to be cautious, stay away from enamel varnishes. Those might react with the decal. Apply the acrylic varnish with a soft brush, a thin layer at a time. (Don't use an airbrush because the solvent - alcohol - used to thin the varnish could react with the decal) It will end up all smooth and shiny!

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