01-08-2013, 03:34 PM
#1
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I have a Tony Miller bridle strop, a vintage one out of an antique store and a new Illinois strop. Any other suggestions? I find the Tony Miller luxurious and yet a draw like velcro, my vintage one just right for me and the Illinois strop with no draw at all.

Any help out there?

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 01-08-2013, 05:20 PM
#2
  • geezer
  • Senior Member
  • Menomonie, Western WI
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You got it covered, There is are a few that appeal. I would stay with what you have. The old and tried seem the best to me. If you have a buddy/s, that has a few strops, get together with him/her and try the strops they have.
I hear the Illinois linen will wear in after a long while. It was a bit too noisy for me when I bought one some time back. Rubbing it with a hard object that flexes it can help.
~Richard

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 01-08-2013, 05:23 PM
#3
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What Richard said. What more do you want?

It's really not going to terribly change the sensation of the shave (if at all).

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 01-08-2013, 05:25 PM
#4
  • MickToley
  • Hi, I'm Mike and I'm a shave soap addict
  • Brooklyn, NY
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I hear good things about the TM horsehide strops.

Here are some others that I can think of off the top of my head:

Straight Razor Designs - http://www.straightrazordesigns.com/the-strop-shop

Rup Razor - http://ruprazor.com/store/index.php?opti...&Itemid=32

Walkin' Horse - http://search.westcoastshaving.com/b/q?k...=161304780

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 01-08-2013, 07:01 PM
#5
  • Kavik79
  • Active Member
  • Albany, NY - USA
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so.....it sounds like you're looking for a medium draw?

My Illinois 127 had loads more draw then my TM Steerhide
I liked my Walking Horse horsehide, but it's a pretty light draw, so you might not

You could always try adding a little neatsfoot oil to the Illinois strop to increase the draw....just do it a little at a time

Do you have any info at all on the strop that's your favorite? Might help people make suggestions for ones similar to it

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 01-08-2013, 07:09 PM
#6
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I've never tried the Tony Miller English Bridle. I prefer a light draw and my Tony Miller Premium Steerhide strop is superb. It's the lightest draw I have found in cowhide. It will feel quite different than Bridle.

If you like a light draw consider the Walking Horse horsehide strops. You can get them at WCS or The Superior Shave. Tony Miller has made horsehide strops in the past but I don't know if and when he will again.

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 01-08-2013, 09:09 PM
#7
  • Snuff
  • Senior Member
  • Belgium
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Of all the ones I tried the TM old traditional horsehide was the best followed by the steer hide. The other Miller (Neil from the UK) also makes wonderful strops

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 01-08-2013, 10:06 PM
#8
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Draw goes sort of like this:

Buffalo
Latigo/Bridle
Kangaroo
Regular leather
TM steerhide & the like
horse
cordovan

And for the cotton:
Linen
cotton
nylon/synthetics
But really, there's no real resistance, just an abrasive feeling or zippy feel.

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 01-08-2013, 11:47 PM
#9
  • GreekGuy
  • Not saving money yet....
  • La Jolla, CA
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While pricey, I highly recommend the Kanayama strops. The quality of the leather is unparalleled.

I have owned a couple TMs and still have 1 which I use regularly. Its well made with great craftsmanship.

Think of it this way: The TM is the well engineered German automobile. The Kanayama is the italian sports car. If you were crossing through the alps in the winter you'd take the German car. But for that sunday drive, you want the italian.

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 01-09-2013, 08:35 AM
#10
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(01-08-2013, 10:06 PM)asharperrazor Wrote: Draw goes sort of like this:

Buffalo
Latigo/Bridle
Kangaroo
Regular leather
TM steerhide & the like
horse
cordovan

And for the cotton:
Linen
cotton
nylon/synthetics
But really, there's no real resistance, just an abrasive feeling or zippy feel.

I think your ranking of draw is essentially correct. There are, however, some interesting departures, depending on how the leather is treated.

For example, I have a Walking Horse Bridle strop which has a surprisingly pleasant draw. I would characterize it as medium, but on the light range of that. It does not have that oily or waxy feel one expects from Latigo or Bridle.

Shell Cordovan is an interesting material. Both Horsehide and Shell Cordovan have a very light draw, but I can't say the Cordovan is lighter than the Horsehide, just different. I ended up deciding I preferred the subjective feel of the Horsehide better. There are those however, who love the feel of the Shell Cordovan.

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 01-09-2013, 01:10 PM
#11
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I agree, bridle is generally slicker than latigo.

Cordovan is so slick, it kind of feels like plastic.

Mostly used for high end shoes and leather goods. It is highly prized for archery finger tabs due to it's slickness and durability.

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 01-09-2013, 07:52 PM
#12
  • geezer
  • Senior Member
  • Menomonie, Western WI
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(01-08-2013, 11:47 PM)GreekGuy Wrote: While pricey, I highly recommend the Kanayama strops. The quality of the leather is unparalleled. ...snip...
The Kanayama is the italian sports car. If you were crossing through the alps in the winter you'd take the German car. But for that sunday drive, you want the italian.
It is my understanding that the old man has stopped making them. He was 92, his quality was slipping, and no one in the family wanted to take on the production. For a short time there seems to have been a different numbering system and then the shops no longer seem to have any. Do a Google for Kanayama Strop for more information on other fora and businesses.
It is unfortunate that more folks did not have access to them. they are keepers!
~Richard

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 01-09-2013, 08:33 PM
#13
  • GreekGuy
  • Not saving money yet....
  • La Jolla, CA
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(01-09-2013, 07:52 PM)geezer Wrote:
(01-08-2013, 11:47 PM)GreekGuy Wrote: While pricey, I highly recommend the Kanayama strops. The quality of the leather is unparalleled. ...snip...
The Kanayama is the italian sports car. If you were crossing through the alps in the winter you'd take the German car. But for that sunday drive, you want the italian.
It is my understanding that the old man has stopped making them. He was 92, his quality was slipping, and no one in the family wanted to take on the production. For a short time there seems to have been a different numbering system and then the shops no longer seem to have any. Do a Google for Kanayama Strop for more information on other fora and businesses.
It is unfortunate that more folks did not have access to them. they are keepers!
~Richard

Richard,

That is indeed the story propagated by Jim Rion at ES. I've heard that is but one variation on what has happened. I do not have an intimate understanding of the matter so I'll leave it at that.

They can still be found at aframes if you are interested. I've bought from Takeshi multiple times and can attest that he puts his reputation behind what he sells. If its not right, he will make it right.

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 01-09-2013, 08:45 PM
#14
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(01-08-2013, 07:01 PM)Kavik79 Wrote: so.....it sounds like you're looking for a medium draw?

My Illinois 127 had loads more draw then my TM Steerhide
I liked my Walking Horse horsehide, but it's a pretty light draw, so you might not

You could always try adding a little neatsfoot oil to the Illinois strop to increase the draw....just do it a little at a time

Do you have any info at all on the strop that's your favorite? Might help people make suggestions for ones similar to it

Yes, that is it exactly - a medium draw is what I am after.

My Illinois strop is slick as ummm, well it is slick. And this AFTER thorough saturation with neatsfoot oil. So that isn't going to develop draw any time soon. My TM is a piece of craftsmanship but yeowww, the draw.

Ironically enough I came home today with a vintage strop that I will be using over the next few days and report back. Somehow I prefer the vintage whether brush, razor or strop.

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 01-09-2013, 09:44 PM
#15
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Normal leather or bridle leather is my recommendation then.

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 01-10-2013, 08:10 AM
#16
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The strop I use everyday is from Neil Miller. An Extra long Burgundy Bridle... A simply beautiful strop. I also have the same strop from Neil in Black Bridle, and there is more difference than just the color!
I've got a Tony Miller Artisan Latigo. When I first got it, it had a frightening amount of draw, and it was nearly unusable for me. But, it was, and is a beautiful piece of workmanship! Now that it has just hung here a few years, the draw has settled down and it actually feels very nice.. Exactly what I had wanted in the first place.
I've also got an SRD Premium 1, which I would call a second tier strop. It has a very slick draw. It feels nice, but the leather surface is quite bumpy and has an area that has cracked. Certainly not the quality put out by the two Miller gentlemen.
They are both high quality Craftsmen, but Neil Miller will make a strop to your specifications. Neil and I had extensive conversations about my requirements, and he fulfilled them perfectly. He is also a gentleman of the first order!
All that said, a strop is probably the most individual choice we can make in this hobby... One man's meat, is another man's poison, and it can be a long, and well travelled road to find one's own "Strop Nirvana.."

Good luck in your journey!

Neil Miller's Burgundy Bridle..

[Image: NeilMiller6.jpg]

[Image: NeilMiller3.jpg]

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 01-10-2013, 10:02 AM
#17
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@ Captain,
If you're into DIY & experimentation, you can use an alcohol/distilled water mixture and remove the wax from the latigo, then refinish it with neatsfoot.

Don't know if it will work, but that's how we get stains and remove shoe polish from shoes.

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 01-10-2013, 04:43 PM
#18
  • geezer
  • Senior Member
  • Menomonie, Western WI
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(01-09-2013, 08:33 PM)GreekGuy Wrote: snip...
Quote: It is unfortunate that more folks did not have access to them. they are keepers!
~Richard

Quote:Richard,
That is indeed the story propagated by Jim Rion at ES. I've heard that is but one variation on what has happened. I do not have an intimate understanding of the matter so I'll leave it at that.
They can still be found at aframes if you are interested. I've bought from Takeshi multiple times and can attest that he puts his reputation behind what he sells. If its not right, he will make it right.
Just to be balanced in coverage. Good points. I know another Asian seller who gave me the information I posted . So, Google "Aframes Tokyo" to see the strops bearing that name.
And if you buy a good one, they are fantastic.
~Richard

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 02-01-2013, 06:54 PM
#19
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I'm a little confused about strops. So while this thread is running:
Does the functional sharpening of the strop change with the draw? As in does a strop with more draw sharpen any faster of slower than one with less draw.

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 02-01-2013, 07:25 PM
#20
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(02-01-2013, 06:54 PM)RezDog Wrote: I'm a little confused about strops. So while this thread is running:
Does the functional sharpening of the strop change with the draw? As in does a strop with more draw sharpen any faster of slower than one with less draw.

No.

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