01-17-2013, 03:04 PM
#1
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As some may or may not know, I'm working n my Bachelors in Anthropology with a focus in archaeology and physical anthropology. I work for the school cataloging artifacts, and to be honest, it's pretty boring repetitive work. But my latest little batch brightened my spirits with their beauty and history, so I thought I would share. These couple dozen or so sherds of pottery are from the Anasazi or Ancient Puebloan culture of the American Southwest, who settled in the Four Corner region around 1000 years ago. Usually I'm just working on flakes of rocks or unremarkable bits of pottery, but these painted pieces really caught my attention and brought me back in time for a moment. Quite beautiful, and full of so much history and mystery. Enjoy!

[Image: 1WSoil.jpg]

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 01-17-2013, 03:09 PM
#2
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Nice. One of the blogs I visit regularly is ArcheoBlog (http://www.acagle.net/ArchaeoBlog/) by Anthony Cagle. If I hadn't gone into medicine, I think I would have loved archeology.

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 01-17-2013, 03:49 PM
#3
  • ben74
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  • Perth, Australia
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Great stuff, thanks for sharing your find!

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 01-17-2013, 04:00 PM
#4
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Thanks for sharing, Anthony! Great when you find little treasures like this. Can you imagine coming across a straight razor one day. Biggrin

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 01-17-2013, 04:08 PM
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(01-17-2013, 04:00 PM)celestino Wrote: Thanks for sharing, Anthony! Great when you find little treasures like this. Can you imagine coming across a straight razor one day. Biggrin

Well, there is quite a bit of obsidian!

I may as well note for everyone, these were dug up in the 60s, I'm just cataloguing them.

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 01-17-2013, 05:23 PM
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Anthony, obsidian could make a great straight razor. Hee hee.

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 01-17-2013, 05:27 PM
#7
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Believe it or not I used to climb around those old cliff dwellings 30 years ago. I don't think they let you do that any more. An amazing way of life they had. Looks like interesting work to me !

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 01-17-2013, 05:43 PM
#8
  • geezer
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  • Menomonie, Western WI
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Thank you!
~Richard

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 01-20-2013, 05:39 PM
#9
  • freddy
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Beautiful pieces, Anthony. Thanks for showing them.

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 02-07-2013, 02:06 PM
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A couple more fantastic pieces. I guess I got the good box this time around.

A little arrowhead, made of obsidian as you may very well know aleady
[Image: cu43Nfsl.jpg]

And for better scale, a broken, unfinished obsidian spear point
[Image: Tcvo9gYl.jpg]

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 02-07-2013, 02:10 PM
#11
  • JaDo
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  • Dallas, TX
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I bet that was a lather bowl in the first pic.

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 02-11-2013, 08:39 PM
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I did my Master's Thesis on Aztec Obsidian tools and I remember reading how the Aztec used prismatic blades to shave. While looking online for depictions of shaving using obsidian blades I found the following video. This guy is taking straight shaving to the next level.




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 02-11-2013, 09:34 PM
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(02-11-2013, 08:39 PM)Shaveologist Wrote: I did my Master's Thesis on Aztec Obsidian tools and I remember reading how the Aztec used prismatic blades to shave. While looking online for depictions of shaving using obsidian blades I found the following video. This guy is taking straight shaving to the next level.

First off, I would LOVE to read your thesis!

Secondly, I've seen this video before! You would have to be a little off your rocker to really do that, those things are crazy sharp, and imagine if it fractured while shaving? Nothing like styptic applied to shards of glass in your face..

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