03-29-2012, 10:43 PM
#1
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So, I finish shaving in my wife's bathroom and I turn to the towel rack to strop my SOC boar on a towel to dry and what is starring at me? Her hair towel. So I figure what the heck. I might as well give it a try. WOW! The absorbancy of the hair towel compared to a regular towel was amazingly better. My brush was very noticeably drier. I now use this towel whenever I shave at home. These towels can be had at Target, Amazon, Wal mart, Walgreens, etc.....for a small fee you can have a super absorbent drying aid. I highly recommend one.

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 03-29-2012, 10:46 PM
#2
  • GreekGuy
  • Not saving money yet....
  • La Jolla, CA
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I've been using a regular washcloth. You're saying there is a special towel I can be using instead?

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 03-30-2012, 04:40 AM
#3
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The Target hair towel is a microfiber towel. Microfibers do a great job of wicking moisture of anything, including a shaving brush.

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 03-30-2012, 04:49 AM
#4
  • TexBilly
  • Moderator Emeritus
  • Austin, TX
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Nice idea, Keith! And those towels have been staring at ME for years!

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 03-30-2012, 05:05 AM
#5
  • Leon
  • Active Member
  • Porto, Portugal
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The bristles of the shaving brush, being a natural "organism" (let's call it that), needs the care just like any other natural hair, like the hair you have on your head, for example.

What I'm going to say is equally true to the bristles in the brush and to the hair on your head:

Be kind to the bristles
Don't make violent drying moves to prevent hair from breaking (like smashing the knot into a towell)
Watch the temperatures. Just like using a blowdryer will weaken your hair, so will hot water temperatures weaken the brush
Be sure to cleanse the hair. Use plenty of room temperature water to remove the residues of lather. Just like you should use a not-very-hot water to remove the shampoo of your hair.

In conclusion, don't do to a brush what you wouldn't do to your own hair.

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 03-30-2012, 05:12 AM
#6
  • Songwind
  • Soap Slinger & Scuttle Pusher
  • Burnsville, MN
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I had no idea there were specific "hair towels."

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 03-30-2012, 05:19 AM
#7
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(03-30-2012, 05:05 AM)Leon Wrote: The bristles of the shaving brush, being a natural "organism" (let's call it that), needs the care just like any other natural hair, like the hair you have on your head, for example.

What I'm going to say is equally true to the bristles in the brush and to the hair on your head:

Be kind to the bristles
Don't make violent drying moves to prevent hair from breaking (like smashing the knot into a towell)
Watch the temperatures. Just like using a blowdryer will weaken your hair, so will hot water temperatures weaken the brush
Be sure to cleanse the hair. Use plenty of room temperature water to remove the residues of lather. Just like you should use a not-very-hot water to remove the shampoo of your hair.

In conclusion, don't do to a brush what you wouldn't do to your own hair.
Thanks Bruno,

That's good food for thought. I'm very gentle w my brushes.
The new site is fabulous!

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 03-30-2012, 10:32 AM
#8
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Great idea and thanks! Did you tell your wife that you used it? Hehe!

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 03-30-2012, 10:54 AM
#9
  • Songwind
  • Soap Slinger & Scuttle Pusher
  • Burnsville, MN
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(03-30-2012, 10:32 AM)celestino Wrote: Great idea and thanks! Did you tell your wife that you used it? Hehe!

You know, the brush was just full of soap, lathered thoroughly and left for 10-20 minutes, then rinsed thoroughly...

It was at least as clean as her hair was. Laughing1

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 03-30-2012, 12:45 PM
#10
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(03-30-2012, 05:05 AM)Leon Wrote: The bristles of the shaving brush, being a natural "organism" (let's call it that), needs the care just like any other natural hair, like the hair you have on your head, for example.

What I'm going to say is equally true to the bristles in the brush and to the hair on your head:

Be kind to the bristles
Don't make violent drying moves to prevent hair from breaking (like smashing the knot into a towell)
Watch the temperatures. Just like using a blowdryer will weaken your hair, so will hot water temperatures weaken the brush
Be sure to cleanse the hair. Use plenty of room temperature water to remove the residues of lather. Just like you should use a not-very-hot water to remove the shampoo of your hair.

In conclusion, don't do to a brush what you wouldn't do to your own hair.

For those of us who have very little to no hair (head shavers) we will just have to remember back, back, way back! Rolleyes


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 03-30-2012, 01:19 PM
#11
  • Howler
  • A calamophile and vintage razor lover
  • Fort Smith AR
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(03-30-2012, 05:05 AM)Leon Wrote: The bristles of the shaving brush, being a natural "organism" (let's call it that), needs the care just like any other natural hair, like the hair you have on your head, for example.

What I'm going to say is equally true to the bristles in the brush and to the hair on your head:

Be kind to the bristles
Don't make violent drying moves to prevent hair from breaking (like smashing the knot into a towell)
Watch the temperatures. Just like using a blowdryer will weaken your hair, so will hot water temperatures weaken the brush
Be sure to cleanse the hair. Use plenty of room temperature water to remove the residues of lather. Just like you should use a not-very-hot water to remove the shampoo of your hair.
Excellent advice.
In conclusion, don't do to a brush what you wouldn't do to your own hair.


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 03-30-2012, 02:33 PM
#12
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Interesting!

If you don't want to get the microfiber drying towel at a beauty supply I bet the exact same thing can be had in automotive. I'm using one now that had that very use on the card that was attached to "sell" it to me.

I looked at it as a shave towel. But I don't use it as one would use a towel, but as a sort of super washcloth/towel hybrid. It holds water like there's no tomorrow, and wrung out, sops water from my face like a water magnet. The problem is that it's too big, so I'm working on getting that taken care of. It could be my perfect shave towel, but I'm still testing it. I'll be sure to keep everyone posted.

Yup, wrung out at the end of the shave it should pull water from the brush fantastically with just a gentle squeeze to get them together. Thanks for that!

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 04-11-2012, 06:30 PM
#13
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
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(03-30-2012, 04:49 AM)texbilly Wrote: Nice idea, Keith! And those towels have been staring at ME for years!

Ha...I will adopt one of my wife's hair towels for my brushes and prepare for a case of stink eye. Laughing1

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 04-11-2012, 07:11 PM
#14
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(03-30-2012, 05:12 AM)Songwind Wrote: I had no idea there were specific "hair towels."

+1

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 04-11-2012, 07:27 PM
#15
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I knew about microfiber towels but not as hair towels. I lightly swipe my brushes on my bath towel after giving them a shake or two. So far so good.

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 04-11-2012, 07:46 PM
#16
  • Songwind
  • Soap Slinger & Scuttle Pusher
  • Burnsville, MN
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So a hair towel is basically a Sham Wow without the shouting Australian?

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 04-12-2012, 06:24 AM
#17
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I just lightly squeeze the bristles and dry the wooden handle with the hand towel and then put the brush back in it's stand. Been doing it that way for thirty years.

Clayton

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